#1
so, where i live there are no guitar teachers and music shops and stuff. so i thought books are probably a good place to start learning some advanced stuff.

it'll be cool if everyone could like post the books they read and how it helped them in this thread.

thanks guys
#2
I'm working my way through john petrucci's 'rock discipline' atm. Its mostly for soloing and stuff, like alternate picking, legato playing, sweep picking etc. It seems pretty good so far...
#3
The books i have at the moment are basically for my theory/sight reading.

Grades 1 - 5 music theory - Eric Taylor

The ab guide to music theory - Eric Taylor

Music theory in practise - Eric Taylor (the eric taylor books need a teacher really)

Mel bays modern guitar method grade 1 - Mel Bay

and a few different chord/technique books.


Thats what I use but im sure people will have some better reccomendations,3 years of playing and i wish i had of started theory earlier
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#4
is it possible to do those books without a teacher? or are they written to be done with a teacher?
#5
Guitar For Dummies.
Help me teach myself immensely. A big help for starting out.
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#6
Fretboard Logic 1 - 2
Joe Satriani - Guitar Secrets
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#8
Quote by andrew88
I'm working my way through john petrucci's 'rock discipline' atm. Its mostly for soloing and stuff, like alternate picking, legato playing, sweep picking etc. It seems pretty good so far...


Yea I am too.. let me ask you something: Some of the stuff that he gives me in the video frankly is not that simple, so what I do is I take whatever part it may be and practice it for a couple days before going on to the next part. Is this what you do?
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#9
For a general theory book, "The New Complete Guitarist" is excellent. Then you could supplement what's in there with something like Fretboard Logic or any of the genre-specific technique books/videos.
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#10
a book called "guitar" by richard chapman, eyewitness companions. pretty good, has a bunch of theory, scales, techniques, a chord dictionary etc...
#11
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Fretboard Logic 1 - 2
Joe Satriani - Guitar Secrets


Amen to that.
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#13
When I first started playing and I knew absolutely NOTHING about guitar, I picked up "Rock Guitar for Dummies" (Not to be confused with "Guitar for Dummies"). It helped me out immensely on gettiing a feel for rock and blues, but it also explained every piece of gear and equipment and what they do (ex - compressors, phasers, etc). It's also got a bunch of cool licks in the style of guys like Jimmy Page, Yngwie Malmsteen, Hendrix, Vai, Al Di Meola, Alex Lifeson, etc.

Then after that book, I started studying theory more. I picked up the "Guitar Grimoire" book on scales, and if I had any questions, I would go to forums like this and ask. Petrucci's "Rock Discipline" DVD helped a bit too.

Also, magazines are a GREAT source of information. See if you can check out a copy of the British guitar magazine, "Guitar Techniques".
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#14
ive read 3 of the books by richard daniels, Be Dangerous on Rock Guitar, The Heavy Guitar Bible, and The Art of Playing Rock Guitar, they are really good, they are all pretty conversational which is something I like and his fretboard diagrams helped me out a lot. Although there is a lot kind of ridiculous humor, there are lots of charts and diagrams and stuff, plus i think all three of those books have a bunch of tabbed out licks in the back, just little stereotypical blues and rock stuff.

The Heavy guitar Bible was his first book and Im not as big of a fan of it as I am the other two. You can get them on heavyguitar.com i think, theyre not that expensive.
#16
Well, The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine obviously... Surprised noone's mentioned it yet.

I love the book for it's clarity and thoroughness.
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#17
i personally like Troy Stetina's "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar" i would recommend it to anyone interested in shred or just helping your technique
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#19
lol @ books, i hate them with a passion.
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#20
I liked Fretboard Logic vols 1-2. Good explanation of many things without going overboard. Which is not how I felt about The New Complete Guitarist, has great graphics and layout but its like more quantity rather then quality, a lot of that stuff I don't think a lot of players would ever really use.
#21
'The Guitar Grimoire- chords and voicings" by Adam Kadman

"The Guitar Cookbook" by Jesse Gress


are two books i bought 2 days ago. Both exellent. I plan on getting the rest of the Guitar Grimoire books, but with each book being about NZ$55 im a bit hard pressed for cash....
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#22
Quote by Carnivean
Yea I am too.. let me ask you something: Some of the stuff that he gives me in the video frankly is not that simple, so what I do is I take whatever part it may be and practice it for a couple days before going on to the next part. Is this what you do?


I dont actually have the video, just the book and cd that came with it, but yeah if I get stuck on something I just keep practicing it really slowly over and over for a while before moving on to the next thing.
#24
Quote by Ace88
lol @ books, i hate them with a passion.

And that's why you're going to be a failure in life.
Hi, I'm Peter
#25
I am currently working through Grade 2 Music Theory by Eric Taylor for my piano learning, although I am way ahead its so easy, I would think Im around Grade 5 or 6 in theory.

I learnt basically all my theory here on UG forums and collumns, its been great.

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#26
My Fav books:

1) Guitar Principles. Should be issued with every guitar sold. It's THE manual on
how to practice.

2) Sheets of Sound. TONS and TONS of great scale patterns that will really give
your fingers and brain a workout. It will help you to see scales over the entire
fretboard much better. You really need to know your basic scales first. Inter to
Advanced material.

3) Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar. Lots of nice excercises that focus on working
basic technique. Goes well with 1)

4) Shred Guitar. I'm not a big Shred fan, but I like this book. It's organized into
10 progressions. Each progression centers on one or more popular metalish modes
and has a number of sample licks for each mode. Part II is a very nice theory
summarization with pretty much all the position charts for most of the scales you
need to know.

5) The Deeper I go, The Deeper it Gets. Another Guitar Principles book. This one
is chicken soup for your musical attitude. A really great read covering music and
guitar and practice and ... lots.
#27
Quote by Night_Lights
are two books i bought 2 days ago. Both exellent. I plan on getting the rest of the Guitar Grimoire books, but with each book being about NZ$55 im a bit hard pressed for cash....


Hm. Save your money. I don't think the Grimoire's are that great. They all pretty
much follow the same format of feeding you the same stuff in each and every key.
If you understand the basic concept of what a key is, you'd realize that these
books are like 90% fluff and repetitive.
#28
The New Complete Guitarist-Richard Chapman

This book introduced me to the world of modes and chord construction. It also has infromation on basic fingerpicking, alternate picking, motifs, scales, and tips on expanding creativity.

Electric Guitar Handbook-Alan Ratcliffe

Basically what the title is. It has info on different brands of strings, picks, and cleaning and maintaining gear. Guide to different pedals and what they do, explanations about amps and PA systems, and tips on getting a band together and starting to gig.
#30
Quote by notoriousnumber
I learnt basically all my theory here on UG forums and collumns, its been great.

Yeah I learn quite a lot of my theory from websites too, mainly here at UG and www.cyberfret.com
#31
Joe Satriani - Guitar Secrets
Terrifying Technique
Jazz Chord Bible
John Petrucci - Rock Secrets
Fretboard Logic
Berkely Guitar Method 1, 2, and 3

as far as theory goes, these books can teach you alot, but it also helps to teach yourself some theory.
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#33
What does anyone think of Troy Stetina's books?

I got Total rock guitar, it seems ok! and I ordered a package of his with all his Metal books and a dvd, really cheap all together...

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#34
A Modern Method for Guitar 1, 2, and 3- William Leavitt
Jazz Guitar Single Note Soloing 1, and 2- Ted Greene
Hot Licks- ?
Shred is not Dead- Terry Syrek
Jazz Guitar Concepts- Robert Brown

The Hot Licks book is really good. Its published by Hal Leonard. Its got a bunch of articles by a bunch of different guitarists ranging from Steve Vai to Leo Kottke to Stanley Jordan. There is an in depth lesson in virtually all styles of playing.
Last edited by The_Cory at Nov 23, 2006,
#35
Has anyone seen/read Marty Friedman's book "Melodic Control?" If so what do you think of it?
#37
Stetina's books are by far my favourite general guitar technique books, I learned pretty much all the most important techniques and concepts from his "Heavy Metal Rhythm" and "Heavy Metal Lead" books. They're very well written, covering both theory and practical applications of it, with lots of nice-sounding licks, improvisation ideas, and full backing tracks for you to play with.

His "Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar" are also absolutely amazing, it's an advanced-level book with great excercises on developing every technical aspect of lead guitar playing. Muchly recommended as well.


I'm also a great fan of Petrucci instructionals, especially his "Wild Stringdom". It's not as generic as Stetina's books, instead it focuses on a variety of specific ideas - it's very fun to play through though, and can help you come up with more ideas to suit your own playing style in any genre of music.
#38
I think Stetina's books are very good beginner to intermediate books. Speed
Mechanics is one I happen to have. It covers some basic techniques pretty well and
the chapter on practice is good.

A more complete coverage of practice methods can be found in Guitar Principles.
About the best on the topic.

For more intermediate to advanced, Sheets of Sound tops my list of favorite books.
#39
Mine was Progressive Guitar Chords. The thing that helped me was the theory section in the back. Along with a complete chord dictionary, i dont know where id be without it.
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