#1
When I play up and down scales, sometimes I rest the thumb side of my palm on the top 2 strings, near the bridge pickup. When I have to play those top two strings, I lift my hand up. Is this bad? I asked my guitar teacher, he said he sometimes used his pinky to anchor, and that its not really that bad.

What do you guys think?
#3
i always use mai pinkey to anchor, but it's w/e's comfortable.
some ppl use their palm to anchor, like u, cause that's wat
they think's comfortable.
#6
It's not bad period, it has it's good and bads, and it's also about comfort.

You can play more accurately, but some say you can also loose speed.

I anchor my pinky but it's really just slightly touching/hovering over the body. I do this just so I can get a reference of where my hand is located by touching the pups or pup screws, just for a little variety in sound of what I'm playing... you know warmer/mellower further up the neck, brighter/more treble closer to the bridge.

But it's all about comfort man, do what's comfortable for you, in return you'll be playing better.
Hai UG!
#7
Quote by L_Z_Nut
You can play more accurately, but some say you can also loose speed.


Well, play more accurately compared to what? If you don't try unanchoring the you have nothing to compare it to. A big part of being a good guitar player is trusting your hands and yourself to know where everything is on the instrument. Honestly, if you have to use some system to tell you where to pick then you're not in tune with your instrument.
#8
For me anchoring my pinky is more accurate compared to playing with my hand all loose, it sort of gives me something to stabilize my hand. But when I want to jump strings it can mess me up that's why I anchor just slightly (not stiff but with enough force that makes it stable but easily movable)which, for me, helps.

LOL it's not really a "system" (I should have explained that better) it's just sort of like a reflex for me. And since I've been playing like that for soo long it becomes second nature, like without thought and thus actually makes me in tune with my instrument. I'm not sitting there like "ohh, ok, theres the pup, this is where I'm suposed to be" I just know when I move my hand its going to be there no matter what, for lack of a better explanation it's like it's magnetically pulled there.
Hai UG!
Last edited by L_Z_Nut at Jul 19, 2006,
#9
Anchoring is bad, mmmkay?

No but rly, watch Paul Gilbert's picking technique. That's good technique right there...
Ibanez Prestige RG1570 ftw!
#10
Quote by L_Z_Nut
For me anchoring my pinky is more accurate compared to playing with my hand all loose, it sort of gives me something to stabilize my hand. But when I want to jump strings it can mess me up that's why I anchor just slightly (not stiff but with enough force that makes it stable but easily movable)which, for me, helps.

LOL it's not really a "system" (I should have explained that better) it's just sort of like a reflex for me. And since I've been playing like that for soo long it becomes second nature, like without thought and thus actually makes me in tune with my instrument. I'm not sitting there like "ohh, ok, theres the pup, this is where I'm suposed to be" I just know when I move my hand its going to be there no matter what, for lack of a better explanation it's like it's magnetically pulled there.


Still doesn't change the fact it's poor technique. -_-; Everyone makes excuses as to why their technique isn't bad but somewhere down the line you'll find difficulty that'll take a lot more work to overcome because you anchor. I anchored for the first 6 months I played but I got out of it and I can tell where everything is. Nobody can do that as soon as they start playing, so anchoring isn't compensating or a solution it's avoiding the problem.
#11
For the most part, you're much better off just learning to avoid anchoring. It builds bad habits and I had a hell of a time getting over it. My first guitar teacher never taught me anything about technique, I had to learn it all myself off the net or get advice from other, more experienced players.
Rig

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#12
I think thats a good rule for new players, to not start anchoring. I've tried practising on not anchoring, but after about 2 weeks, i found that either 1) It was taking too long, meaning i was too used to anchoring already 2) Maybe for some people anchoring is a must to have any control at all.

I dunno. Its not like its the end of the world if you anchor, it might be a bad habit that slows you down, but we're talking about so insignifigantly small margines, that i don't think it matters much unless you're planning to be a world class shredder.
#13
I anchor my side of my hand behind the bridge like sort of resting it there. I rest it behind the bridge as not to mute the strings, but close so it's easy to palm mute if I have to.
Member of the 'Guitarists Born In 1991' Club. PM Greendayguitar, gdm09 or blues_rocker to join.

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#14
Quote by NotAJock2Day
Still doesn't change the fact it's poor technique. -_-; Everyone makes excuses as to why their technique isn't bad but somewhere down the line you'll find difficulty that'll take a lot more work to overcome because you anchor. I anchored for the first 6 months I played but I got out of it and I can tell where everything is. Nobody can do that as soon as they start playing, so anchoring isn't compensating or a solution it's avoiding the problem.



Whatever man... you can tell me it's bad technique t'ill your blue in the face. It doesn't change the fact that that's how I play because it's more comfortable for me, which in return makes me play better because I'm more relaxed. And it's not like I'm always anchored, I do let my hand go loose when it needs to, like when playing chords and fancy rhythm work. I usually anchor when I need to play some fast blues licks on the higher strings but once I start to play on the bass strings I usually go loose.

I play mainly blues, and I noticed a lot of really great blues guitarists play the same way as I do, but some also play the un-anchored way. Technically it is also bad technique to play with your thumb wrapped over the fretboard, but a lot of guitarist do it and IMO this doesn't compromise their ability to play or create great music.... what I mean is your technique doesn't matter as long as you can create great music.

And hey, if for some reason latter on in my life I feel like I need to stop anchoring my pinky, the added work, strain, and hours of practice will make me a better musician.
Hai UG!
#15
Anchoring is really not a good idea for a number of reasons.

In my opinion, the main one is this: if you are anchoring to steady your hand so
that you can pick the strings more accurately, you will probably never learn the
arm control that you'll need to do more demanding playing. This is anchoring
that's being used as a crutch and ultimately your picking is going to suffer for it.

You can pick just as accurately unanchored AND be a lot more fluid and relaxed.
However, it DOES take some work to develop thast control. Since it is more
work, people will avoid doing it. That's why you'll hear a lot of the "it's more
comfortable to anchor" arguments.

Another argument is "Well, I've seen so-and-so anchor, so it must be ok".
Well, for one thing, you're NOT so-and-so, and for another I'm talking about
practice to learn arm control, not playing. Once you've mastered the arm control,
it doesn't matter so much because you'll have the control either anchored or
unanchored and you'll have a CHOICE.
#16
Quote by L_Z_Nut
Whatever man... you can tell me it's bad technique t'ill your blue in the face. It doesn't change the fact that that's how I play because it's more comfortable for me, which in return makes me play better because I'm more relaxed. And it's not like I'm always anchored, I do let my hand go loose when it needs to, like when playing chords and fancy rhythm work. I usually anchor when I need to play some fast blues licks on the higher strings but once I start to play on the bass strings I usually go loose.

I play mainly blues, and I noticed a lot of really great blues guitarists play the same way as I do, but some also play the un-anchored way. Technically it is also bad technique to play with your thumb wrapped over the fretboard, but a lot of guitarist do it and IMO this doesn't compromise their ability to play or create great music.... what I mean is your technique doesn't matter as long as you can create great music.

And hey, if for some reason latter on in my life I feel like I need to stop anchoring my pinky, the added work, strain, and hours of practice will make me a better musician.


See? A whole post of excuses.

And hey, if for some reason later in your life you feel like you can't move your hand due to carpal tunnel syndrome, the added pain, strain, and hours of physical therapy WON'T make you a better player.

If you have the potential to be great, the only thing anchoring will do is slow your growth. If you practice and practice, you can get good with poor technique. Some people can play with their feet. But you know what? That's because they don't have arms. They don't have a choice, but anchored players do. They're just (generally) too lazy to address the problem.

It's not even a matter of playing fast. String skipping and other techniques that can diversify the way your music sounds becomes difficult because of that crutch. Even if you don't feel the tension it doesn't mean its there, and it sure as hell doesn't mean it's good for you either. On top of that, there's also a risk of hand related complications down the road. Quite a few great jazz and blues musicians are blind, so go pry your eyes out.

I don't mean to be annoying about the issue, but everytime I run into an anchored player its habitual for me to state my case. Usually, there's no reason for their technique besides laziness.
#17
Yeah but see, I don't really play anchored or unanchored, my pinky is usually just touching the body, not stiff, and I never applying pressure to the body.

BTW "so-and-so" was able to play properly with "improper" technique because he/she practiced a hell of a lot of hours that way. If you practice a certain way for a long time, "imporper" technique or not, and are still able to make great music, that's all that matters.

Anyways this topic got a little off track, it was about anchoring your palm on the bridge not your pinky. So to threadstarter if it makes you comfortable to play that way then do it... you can always learn to play differently latter on anyways, so don't worry about it.
Hai UG!
#18
Quote by NotAJock2Day

I don't mean to be annoying about the issue, but everytime I run into an anchored player its habitual for me to state my case. Usually, there's no reason for their technique besides laziness.


There's one thing I've learned from UG: there's really no point in arguing with
somebody that's determined to anchor.

Also, there's a recent thread in the MT Forum on anchoring that goes on for like
30 pages. So, anyone can read lots and lots about it there. That's probably
where this post should have gone....
#19
Quote by NotAJock2Day
Bad. Period.

Eventually you'll be playing phrases and runs that won't even give you time to move your hand out of the way so it's better to lose the habit now.



Lmao, its all preference.

Some of the best guitar players in the world anchor.
RIG
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#20
Quote by L_Z_Nut
Anyways this topic got a little off track, it was about anchoring your palm on the bridge not your pinky. So to threadstarter if it makes you comfortable to play that way then do it... you can always learn to play differently latter on anyways, so don't worry about it.


Well, I've had my say, so if you want to anchor, happy trails!

And to threadstarter: what's initially comfortable isn't always what's best. Dealing
with a problem sooner when it may be easier to fix, might be better than having
to deal with a big honkin gorilla later on.

If you aren't too concerned about being able to play well, do what's comfortable.
If you really want to play to the best of your talent, do what's best.
#21
OK, before this gets into a bad arguement let me clear things up... again. I don't technically anchor. My pinky (and my ring finger now that I think about it) is just touching the body, practiaclly hovering, not applying pressure to the body. When I pick, my pinky and ring finger actually move around quite a bit.

some examples: Here's "bad" anchoring. This is not what I do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qxncThaNyA&search=guitar

Here's basically what I do. Except when you see Gary Moore doing those really fast licks and his pinky looks like it's sticking out a bit, I don't do that, my hand usually just stays the way it was.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUtZJ_kwG9E&search=guitar

I just hate it when people say "you shouldn't play like that" unless you can really hear that the person is playing badly because of that.... I mean cause if they're playing great with bad technique who the hell are you to say its wrong.
Hai UG!
Last edited by L_Z_Nut at Jul 20, 2006,
#22
^ Anchoring is anchoring, so now you've been putting down your own playing this whole time.... smooth going.

I doubt anyone who anchors puts alot of pressure, i know i dont. I just have it resting their, JUST LIKE YOU DO.

Bad anchoring?.... Man, theres no BAD anchoring......... your sad i swear...

Im done with this thread.
RIG
Jackson SL3 Soloist
89' Ibanez RG570
Vader 4x12 Cabinet
Line 6 HD147 Head
6space HEAD/RACK case
Korg DTR1000 Rack Tuner
Furman Power Conditioner
ISP Decimator
#23
LOL geez I meant to put it in " " these but I forgot (fixed now)... kind of like this is their definition of "bad" technique, and I never once put it down.... don't jump to conclusions man, and don't put words in my mouth.

And in the first vid that guy is putting pressure on the body.
Hai UG!
Last edited by L_Z_Nut at Jul 20, 2006,