#1
Hi everyone,

I am learning to play the accoustic guitar and I am happy with my progress to date, however I am having real trouble changing from say a "C" to an "F" chord, I feel really clumsy doing it.

Do you guys change to an "F" barr chord or the full "F", is it normal to feel all fingers and thumbs with this chord, its almost as if my fingers get in the way of each other.

I know there are lessons on practice and they are great but I wanted to hear from people who have had the same problem, I want to hear how you got over it even though the more experinced guys are gonna flame me and tell me to practice practice practice, and to you guys I say "I am, Honest"

Regards


Pete
#3
i had a LOT of problems shifting and i know what you mean when you say it feels like your fingers get in the way of each other..... its nothing to worry about because as long as you practice enough it should be ok.... also make sure you are holding the right string with the right finger... check out some sites or books, they should tell you how to properly hold a chord..
#4
from a C, just flatten your index to barre yoru B and E strings, then move your 2nd and 3rd finger down a string each, thats a very easy chord change.
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#5
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Its end of term so won't see him until sept, but your response is exactly what I don't need.
#6
Two tricks to this are to practice changing between them slowly, and completley come off with your hand. Like lift all of your fingers a good inch or two off the neck so that your hand's completely open above the fretboard. You'll learn to get your fingers out of the way, and bring them down on the strings you want that way. This can also be done with either the full barre or any other chord all by itself, so that your hand learns how to come on the neck.

Once you start getting your fingers clear, what you want to do is focus on leaving your ring finger on that C, and laying your index finger down for the barre. When you bring your index finger on for the barre without moving your ring ringer, your middle finger should naturally want to pull down onto the next lower string -- which is where you want it. From there it just becomes a matter of putting your pinky on; which you've already learned how to do.

The trick to getting use to this, and a lot of other chord changes, is 1) limiting the amount of movement you actually use, and understanding how your fingers are moving around each other so they don't get tangled up (slow it down, study how each one moves in the air, and which ones stay put), and 2) Learning to keep your pinky hovering over the neck -- in this case, close to your ring finger, so that it only needs to drop onto the string.
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#7
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Two tricks to this are to practice changing between them slowly, and completley come off with your hand. Like lift all of your fingers a good inch or two off the neck so that your hand's completely open above the fretboard. You'll learn to get your fingers out of the way, and bring them down on the strings you want that way. This can also be done with either the full barre or any other chord all by itself, so that your hand learns how to come on the neck.

Once you start getting your fingers clear, what you want to do is focus on leaving your ring finger on that C, and laying your index finger down for the barre. When you bring your index finger on for the barre without moving your ring ringer, your middle finger should naturally want to pull down onto the next lower string -- which is where you want it. From there it just becomes a matter of putting your pinky on; which you've already learned how to do.

The trick to getting use to this, and a lot of other chord changes, is 1) limiting the amount of movement you actually use, and understanding how your fingers are moving around each other so they don't get tangled up (slow it down, study how each one moves in the air, and which ones stay put), and 2) Learning to keep your pinky hovering over the neck -- in this case, close to your ring finger, so that it only needs to drop onto the string.


Thank you so much for this and everyone else for your support.

pete