#1
Hi!

I have a DVD, where somebody explains Chord Progressions in Blues Songs. Since most Rock Songs refer to Blues I was wondering how it's possible that there are sometimes many different Chords in one bar because that teacher on the DVD explains 12 Bar Blues with 3 Chords which each one is played over more than one bar. Can somebody explain that to me.

thank you

Ps: sorry for my english!
#3
If you have a DVD on blues progressions, perhaps it's referring to a basic 12 Bar Blues progression.

It isn't what you described, but your question is kind of vague... and without further explanation is the only thing that came to mind.
#4
my question is: how can blues songs sound differently since there are such strict rules (what makes the difference between songs). And maybe you can explain the rock progression rules to me.
#5
there are many variations on the standard twelve bar blues which hange that, plus 12 bar blues is generally more related to the rhythm section, with a lead player playing over the top of it, or atleast harmonising with those basic chords, there are also other blues progressions, like 8 bar blues. And finally, you dont have to play 12 bar blues for it to be blues, if it sounds bluesy, its blues.
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#6
Quote by epiphonecoronet
my question is: how can blues songs sound differently since there are such strict rules (what makes the difference between songs). And maybe you can explain the rock progression rules to me.

what makes a lot of blues sound different is that they dont stick strictly to the rules. a lot of blues artists might use dominant chords in place of normal chords, or use some form of chord subsitution to give a different feel. also, the lead line can really make a song sound different, so in many cases its just that.

for rock, there isnt really a sterotypical progression as much. especially since there are so many different genres of rock. i mean punk kinda has a sterotypical 3 powerchord thing going on, metal is like fast on the low E with a few powerchords, and soft rock could be said to use mostly open chords. you could actually start by just using the I IV V chords to write a rock song if you need a place to start. dont stick to the 12 bar blues exactly, but draw ideas from it. that could help you with a start.
#7
thank you jof! that answers my question mostly, but what about that there are many different chords (which are no alteration of the basechord) in one bar?
Last edited by epiphonecoronet at Jul 20, 2006,
#8
What about them? They exist, yes... many chords in one bar? I don't quite get your question.
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#9
Quote by redwing_suck
What about them? They exist, yes... many chords in one bar? I don't quite get your question.

Same here...

Can you give an example of "many chords in one bar", or what you are trying to ask? Maybe I'm just reading it wrong.