#1
i have heard alot about them, and using them in solos, how exactly do you do them, and what exactly are they?
im self taught, and been playing for a year, so its hard for me to find information on things like these, i dont have a teacher telling me, so i need some info, thanks guys
#2
An arpeggio is going through the notes of a chord one by one.


e|-----------0------------------------------
B|---------0---0----------------------------
G|-------0-------0--------------------------
D|-----2-----------2------------------------
A|---2---------------2----------------------
E|-0--------------------0-------------------


That, for example was an Em arpeggio. A lot of guitarists use arpeggiated barre chords for sweep picking and the like, though of course they aren't limited to sweeps.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#3
Arpeggios are broken chords. Insted of strumming a chord, you play each note one by one. House Of The Rising Sun is a good example.

Alot of guys into shred use them all over the neck, but i only like em used with simple chords.
Quote by Dirtydeeds468
People don't like Dave Mustaine because he created something that owned Metallica in just about every single aspect of thrash metal.


it's true
#5
If it's a chord, it can be arpeggiated.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#6
Quote by the_man101
so you can play them any where in the neck?

Yep, like in a solo, if you are playing over an A minor chord, an option would be to arpeggiate it and stress the notes A, C, and E, since those are the notes that give A minor its basic tonal quality.
#7
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Yep, like in a solo, if you are playing over an A minor chord, an option would be to arpeggiate it and stress the notes A, C, and E, since those are the notes that give A minor its basic tonal quality.


but what about the solo being a differnt keys than the song, woudnt not match up, like the is the solo was played way down in in the 15th fret?
also is it possible to arpeggiate a power chord? if so how?
#8
Quote by the_man101
but what about the solo being a differnt keys than the song, woudnt not match up, like the is the solo was played way down in in the 15th fret?


Umm...rephrase please?

If the solo was in a different key than the song, it would sound different, but how is this related to arpeggiating?

Do you mean how it will sound if you arpeggiate a chord one or two octaves higher? Well try it out and see for yourself. It still sounds nice lol.
#9
^ i was asking if you Arpeggio a chord in a differnt key than it is played when strummed would it still match up in the song, say you were strumming a c chord, and you arpeggio it some where around the 12th fret, would it still sound good?
ok thanks guys for the help
#10
Quote by the_man101
^ i was asking if you Arpeggio a chord in a differnt key than it is played when strummed would it still match up in the song, say you were strumming a c chord, and you arpeggio it some where around the 12th fret, would it still sound good?
ok thanks guys for the help

So if someone was playing a C major chord over and over again and you played this?

e------12h15hp15-----------------
b--13--------------12b13----
g--------------------------------
d-------------------------------
a----------------------------
E------------------------------


It would still be good. The C major triad is C E G. When you arpeggiate it, all you are doing is playing the notes C, E, and G--just an octave or two higher (or lower depending on where the chord is being played and where you want to arpeggiate it), but it's still in the same key, the only difference is in pitch.