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#1
Self explanitory. How many songs do you know how to play all the way through, and how long have you been playing? Both questions are estimates.
#3
covers?
about 1.
i've been playing for about five or six years...taken it seriously for about 2.
maybe i should learn one sometime. i just don't particularly care to play other peoples stuff. i know a couple riffs i thought were cool, but i pretty much just use them to test out gear i'm considering buying.
#4
Ive been playing for 9 months and can play 4 whole songs and 3 songs about half way through.
My gear:
-OLP MM2
-OLP practice amp 10w
-Ernie Ball Hybrid Slinky Strings
-1.14 Everly Star Picks
#7
I know probably 10 songs all the way through. I can sing and play to maybe 6 of them? Been playing about 7.5 months now. The reason I said full songs is because i know about 50 songs, but only parts of them. Either the intro or just various pieces.
#8
exactly one year and i know like 20 songs
...."this is what's best for me, for you, for us, or maybe just for me", i thought...
#9
For acoustic stuff which i started 4 months ago like 15 with lyrics memorized,
probally like 30-40 if i didnt need to know the words.
Then when i wasnt doing acoustic i knew like 14 with no words and like 3 with.

Most of the stuff i know comes in the last 4 months.

Been playing for 2 years though.
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#11
Lets see..

Wish You Were Here (without the last solo)
Is There Anybody Out There?
Nothing Else Matters
Pallar Anders Visa

Is that it? I guess those are the only ones. I've been playing for about 8 months, acoustic only 2 months.
#12
you gotta evolve from looking up tabs on the internet and starting making up your own **** guys
#14
Quote by hilikus533
you gotta evolve from looking up tabs on the internet and starting making up your own **** guys


I like playin songs that people know and can sing along to and stuff.
#15
I wrote a song this morning funnily enough, im writing the music for it now.
probably song topic number 10 but the second proper actual song, along with Cigarette smoke on the silver screen
#16
yeah i have no idea how many songs.

i cant pull every song i can play out of my ass. i forget about some of them and blah blah blah

Its not important how many songs you know. Its about how you play your music (or somebody elses)

Just play
#17
Quote by hilikus533
you gotta evolve from looking up tabs on the internet and starting making up your own **** guys



i've been writing for 4 months and have 21 full songs i wrote. Is that enough of making your own stuff?
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#18
i always learn new songs and forget old ones. maybe i can do around 10 songs fully with the singing and everything. i love playing covers of my favorite songs and giving my own twist to them. good fun.
Nowadays all the songs on the radio, all drive me crazy.
#19
Quote by JET116
yeah i have no idea how many songs.

i cant pull every song i can play out of my ass. i forget about some of them and blah blah blah

Its not important how many songs you know. Its about how you play your music (or somebody elses)

Just play



Best way of putting it.
Guitar is about playing, not memorizing.

If any of you know Tool's guitarist, he once said that he went to a music university (forget which one) and studied all the theory he could possibly study, but he hardly ever uses it. Everything comes from your gut, if all you do is study, you're not going to be very creative (just like yngwie malmsteen - super fast, super bad).

Live to play, don't play to live. (i think lol)
#20
About a year now and i can play more songs then i can count on my fingers and toes hahahah
In The Car I Just Cant Wait . . To Pick You Up On Our Very First Date
#21
Quote by hilikus533
Best way of putting it.
Guitar is about playing, not memorizing.

If any of you know Tool's guitarist, he once said that he went to a music university (forget which one) and studied all the theory he could possibly study, but he hardly ever uses it. Everything comes from your gut, if all you do is study, you're not going to be very creative (just like yngwie malmsteen - super fast, super bad).

Live to play, don't play to live. (i think lol)



I have high respect for Tool's guitarist, and the band in general, but just because one professional guitarist said that he went to a university and learned theory and then never used it doesnt mean that its not good to learn it anyways. If you dont learn your theory then you either play from your gut (still sounding marvelous) and you have no idea how anything works, or you play from your gut and sound a whole lot worse than you could be sounding if you knew why and how things worked. Everyones different- some people like to sit down and study theory (myself, which is probably why I have this opinion) and then go and try to experiment with the knowledge of, for example, what are the possible chords that could come after an introductory chord, or which scale should be mainly used to play over a certain progression. Once you know that stuff deep down, then you can start breaking the rules a little bit without getting carried away, and you create some great stuff. Then of course some people are too anxious so they just go start making things or they dont feel like sitting down and learning the theory, and they just go straight to experimenting and using their ear, which can also be great for you because music is about sound and if you dont create the ear for it, and only the brains for it, then your lost. So in the end everyone has a sense of theory, whether you teach it to yourself by playing, or your taught it and then go and play with it.
The lead guitarist from Tool might be playing from his gut and feel like hes not using any of the knowledge from his select univirsity, but in fact since its already embedded into him, he doesnt need to think about it to know whats happening.

People are good and people are bad; with and without the theory.
Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions. -Aristotle

Quote by JMack
you got something against americans? at least we dont get whales stuck in our rivers.
Last edited by Nachtmusik at Jul 24, 2006,
#22
Two years, zero songs.

I have very bad memorization, I usually can't even remember an open chord progression (since they're all so interchangeable). The only full songs I've memorized would be...um...

Yeah, nothing really.

Two years
#23
Just answer the question! This isn't a discussion of theory versus gut feel, or the pros and cons of pearning other's music or writing your own stuff.

So, to answer the question, been playing for over 20 years, and I have no idea how many songs I can play. I have memory for music and can play from jazz standards like Summertime to,well, you name it.
#24
Quote by Nachtmusik
I have high respect for Tool's guitarist, and the band in general, but just because one professional guitarist said that he went to a university and learned theory and then never used it doesnt mean that its not good to learn it anyways. If you dont learn your theory then you either play from your gut (still sounding marvelous) and you have no idea how anything works, or you play from your gut and sound a whole lot worse than you could be sounding if you knew why and how things worked. Everyones different- some people like to sit down and study theory (myself, which is probably why I have this opinion) and then go and try to experiment with the knowledge of, for example, what are the possible chords that could come after an introductory chord, or which scale should be mainly used to play over a certain progression. Once you know that stuff deep down, then you can start breaking the rules a little bit without getting carried away, and you create some great stuff. Then of course some people are too anxious so they just go start making things or they dont feel like sitting down and learning the theory, and they just go straight to experimenting and using their ear, which can also be great for you because music is about sound and if you dont create the ear for it, and only the brains for it, then your lost. So in the end everyone has a sense of theory, whether you teach it to yourself by playing, or your taught it and then go and play with it.
The lead guitarist from Tool might be playing from his gut and feel like hes not using any of the knowledge from his select univirsity, but in fact since its already embedded into him, he doesnt need to think about it to know whats happening.

People are good and people are bad; with and without the theory.


You're quite wrong on most the points you try to make. In college level music theory classes, they don't teach you things you would use when composing a tool song. I know this because I take AP Music Theory, and they outlined all the years of it and none of it is relevent to your playing style. It's all good to learn, but its not just what you think it is (scales and chords). No doubt you have to study theory like your seven modes, pentatonic scales, intervals, different root chords, and arpeggios, but the things they teach you in music theory class, rarely involve composing songs on the guitar, especially for most genres today.

I've studied theory the whole time I've been playing guitar, and honestly, it made me worse at making up songs. Knowing where to go and what is technically right, is hardly the creative way to do anything. And my proof goes beyond Tool's guitarist.

Look at all the bands in the past, and tell me which ones you think had enough money, time, or desire to go to music theory universities. Guns n roses, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers, JIMI HENDRIX, Stevie Ray Vaughn, BB King, blah blah blah, TONS of those bands are just high school dropouts you created music almost every day for the sake of just being a band, not accomplishing the fact that you can tell your self you know more theory than your class buddies.
#25
There was a time when I had to play guitar for 8hrs (it was actually 12 but I had breaks) and I didn't play the same song twice and I still knew a lot more songs. I don't remember a lot of those songs anymore tho.
Not taking any online orders.
#26
Quote by hilikus533
You're quite wrong on most the points you try to make. In college level music theory classes, they don't teach you things you would use when composing a tool song. I know this because I take AP Music Theory, and they outlined all the years of it and none of it is relevent to your playing style. It's all good to learn, but its not just what you think it is (scales and chords). No doubt you have to study theory like your seven modes, pentatonic scales, intervals, different root chords, and arpeggios, but the things they teach you in music theory class, rarely involve composing songs on the guitar, especially for most genres today.

I've studied theory the whole time I've been playing guitar, and honestly, it made me worse at making up songs. Knowing where to go and what is technically right, is hardly the creative way to do anything. And my proof goes beyond Tool's guitarist.

Look at all the bands in the past, and tell me which ones you think had enough money, time, or desire to go to music theory universities. Guns n roses, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers, JIMI HENDRIX, Stevie Ray Vaughn, BB King, blah blah blah, TONS of those bands are just high school dropouts you created music almost every day for the sake of just being a band, not accomplishing the fact that you can tell your self you know more theory than your class buddies.


just because someone didn't go to school as a music theory major is irrelevant to whether or not they know anything about music theory. i can assure you that everyone you just listed knows a thing or two about music theory. you said that the things they teach you in music theory classes don't "involve" composing songs on the guitar. that's just not true. of course a music theory class isn't just sitting around with a teacher composing music, but anything you learn about music theory can be applied when composing. i don't really understand how you can say any different. sure lots/all musicians compose from their "gut," but what do you think is in their gut? i'd guess lots of music theory

anyway, i've been playing for a bit over 5 years now and i guess i probably know hundreds of songs. i may not necessarily be able to remember all of them note for note, but a quick listen to a song or a quick glance at the tabs for a song accompanied by a few moments of experimenting is generally enough of a refresher to play the song again.
#27
alright, jimtak your RETARDED

listen to any hendrix songs........
he ****ing never studied theory, thats a ****ing fact...
look at gunsnroses, sure the solos are ****ing sweet, but its all pentatonic
look at metallica, their riffs are just standard pentatonic progressions with chromatic parts thrown in.
more than ****ing 3/4s of the bands people listen to NEVER went to school for music. theory hardly coexists with making up catchy, successful, and great songs. it just doesn't, play guitar for a bit longer and you'll understand, or join a band.

sure, bands like opeth use tons of theory, but thats rare, and more modern.
#28
^-- even if i am "RETARDED," at least i know how to read and write. should you ever learn to read, you should try out my original post for practice. i clearly said that just because someone didn't go to school as a music theory major doesn't mean that they don't know anything about music theory.

you cited metallica as an example and stated that "their riffs are just standard pentatonic progressions with chromatic parts thrown in." that would be an example of simple music theory.

you said that "theory hardly coexists with making up catchy, successful, and great songs." as retarded as i may be, i do happen to know the definition of the word coexist. maybe you should look it up before you continue to use words that do little or nothing to help your point. for the sake of timeliness, i will assume that what you were trying to say is that making up catchy, successful, and great songs is hardly dependent upon knowledge of music theory. if this is what you were trying to imply, then i agree. i actually didn't ever say anything that would be in disagreement with this. all i said was:

anything you learn about music theory can be applied when composing.

personally, i don't think you've done anything in the direction of making a valid disagreement with what i said.
#29
Quote by hilikus533
alright, jimtak your RETARDED

listen to any hendrix songs........
he ****ing never studied theory, thats a ****ing fact...
look at gunsnroses, sure the solos are ****ing sweet, but its all pentatonic
look at metallica, their riffs are just standard pentatonic progressions with chromatic parts thrown in.
more than ****ing 3/4s of the bands people listen to NEVER went to school for music. theory hardly coexists with making up catchy, successful, and great songs. it just doesn't, play guitar for a bit longer and you'll understand, or join a band.

sure, bands like opeth use tons of theory, but thats rare, and more modern.
Wow...seriously, this is one of the most laughably misguided posts I've ever read by someone who claims to know what he/she is talking about.

Hendrix didn't study theory. GOOD JOB! You named a one in a million exception to the rule! Obviously, since Hendrix did it, every other guitarist out there is also a natural at composing music without using theory. After all, it's not like Hendrix was unique at all, right?

Quote by hilikus533
look at gunsnroses, sure the solos are ****ing sweet, but its all pentatonic
look at metallica, their riffs are just standard pentatonic progressions with chromatic parts thrown in.
Aka basic music theory, dipshit.
#30
YOU ALL OBVIOUSLY HAVEN't READ MY FIRST POST THEN..
NO ****ING $HIT SONGS HAVE THEORY IN THEM, HOW ELSE WOULD THEY BE COMPOSED.

I SIMPLY SAID THAT STUDYING THEORY ALL YOUR CAREER ISNT GOING TO HELP YOU COMPOSE BETTER SONGS.

for ****s sake, shut the **** up
#31
Quote by hilikus533
YOU ALL OBVIOUSLY HAVEN't READ MY FIRST POST THEN..
NO ****ING $HIT SONGS HAVE THEORY IN THEM, HOW ELSE WOULD THEY BE COMPOSED.

I SIMPLY SAID THAT STUDYING THEORY ALL YOUR CAREER ISNT GOING TO HELP YOU COMPOSE BETTER SONGS.

for ****s sake, shut the **** up
No one was talkin about studying theory for an entire career.

Ps - calm down
#32
Hendrix composed a lot of great songs from his "guts", but he was frustrated cause he never know any music theory. Music theory it help to compose better cause it make you know whats going on the song. Listen to satriani, vai or petrucci, they are amazing composer and about Metallica, hetfield must know a little music theory cause he started playing piano.
#35
I've probably learned close to 40 different songs. I've probably fogotten most of them. I've been playing for 3 years, but I also haven't looked up many tabs. I just like playing by ear.
#36
ive been playing for about 7 years, i know way to many songs to give an accurate number. I have several notebooks and Cds filled with stuff ive written.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#38
Well, lets see...about 8. And I've been playing for, uhh, about 2 years but have learned most of these songs pretty recently.
#39
Quote by hilikus533
alright, jimtak your RETARDED

listen to any hendrix songs........
he ****ing never studied theory, thats a ****ing fact...
look at gunsnroses, sure the solos are ****ing sweet, but its all pentatonic
look at metallica, their riffs are just standard pentatonic progressions with chromatic parts thrown in.
more than ****ing 3/4s of the bands people listen to NEVER went to school for music. theory hardly coexists with making up catchy, successful, and great songs. it just doesn't, play guitar for a bit longer and you'll understand, or join a band.

sure, bands like opeth use tons of theory, but thats rare, and more modern.



You dont need money to study theory. Well a little bit yes, but a lot- no. You dont need to be in school to study theory, you could pick up a book on theory that hits all the basics for less than 10 dollars. How much money did JIMI HENDRIX or anyone else you listed, spend on guitars and equiptment- Im sure they had spent a few dollars on some kind of theory book, and if they didnt... Im sure they know a little bit of theory just from playing for years and years. If I stated before it was a necessity to go to college for theory then you've caught me at fault- It isnt a necessity. Its necessary to learn theory though- you do it through playing. I was simply stating that in a poorly written paragraph or two to the kid 2 posts before me saying that you shouldnt learn theory (or giving off that kind of vibe). He was giving off a discouraging post to learning theory and I disagree. I would encourage people to learn theory because if you learn it and then put it to good use- and bend the rules of it you can create great music.

Quote by hilikus533
YOU ALL OBVIOUSLY HAVEN't READ MY FIRST POST THEN..
NO ****ING $HIT SONGS HAVE THEORY IN THEM, HOW ELSE WOULD THEY BE COMPOSED.

I SIMPLY SAID THAT STUDYING THEORY ALL YOUR CAREER ISNT GOING TO HELP YOU COMPOSE BETTER SONGS.

for ****s sake, shut the **** up


I had never said anything about studying it as an entire career- That would be learning something and then not putting it to use. The point of learning theory would be to use in practically in making music- being thats what it was created for.

Quote by El Cumanés
Hendrix composed a lot of great songs from his "guts", but he was frustrated cause he never know any music theory. Music theory it help to compose better cause it make you know whats going on the song. Listen to satriani, vai or petrucci, they are amazing composer and about Metallica, hetfield must know a little music theory cause he started playing piano.


When I stated in the beginning about "playing from your gut (but still sound marvelous)", Jimi Hendrix would be an incredebly good example of that. But in the same sentence I mentioned that you could be composing a whole lot better if you knew what you were doing. This doesnt exactly apply to Hendrix because he was simply one of the greats of guitar, but a lot of mediocre bands that just ruffed it through high school, started a band, and hit it big because they could play what their friend showed them, could be a hell of a lot better with some style if they knew some theory.
Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions. -Aristotle

Quote by JMack
you got something against americans? at least we dont get whales stuck in our rivers.
Last edited by Nachtmusik at Jul 28, 2006,
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