#1
Summary: If you have just started to play the bass guitar, then you will need this lesson as it shows every single note on the bass guitar (4-string bass guitars).

Important notes:

When you are plucking any string without using the frets, that is known as the 'open' string, or fret 0. For example, plucking the E string without holding any fret will be an E.

In the E string, frets 1 and 13 are both F, but it is in different pitch. On fret 1, the F is lower whilst fret 13 is higher.

b = flat
# = sharp

E string (thickest string):

Fret 1: F
Fret 2: F#
Fret 3: G
Fret 4: G#
Fret 5: A
Fret 6: Bb
Fret 7: B
Fret 8: C
Fret 9: C#
Fret 10: D
Fret 11: D#
Fret 12: E
Fret 13: F
Fret 14: F#
Fret 15: G
Fret 16: G#
Fret 17: A
Fret 18: Bb
Fret 19: B
Fret 20: C

A string:

Fret 1: Bb
Fret 2: B
Fret 3: C
Fret 4: C#
Fret 5: D
Fret 6: D#
Fret 7: E
Fret 8: F
Fret 9: F#
Fret 10: G
Fret 11: G#
Fret 12: A
Fret 13: Bb
Fret 14: B
Fret 15: C
Fret 16: C#
Fret 17: D
Fret 18: D#
Fret 19: E
Fret 20: F

D string:

Fret 1: D#
Fret 2: E
Fret 3: F
Fret 4: F#
Fret 5: G
Fret 6: G#
Fret 7: A
Fret 8: Bb
Fret 9: B
Fret 10: C
Fret 11: C#
Fret 12: D
Fret 13: D#
Fret 14: E
Fret 15: F
Fret 16: F#
Fret 17: G
Fret 18: G#
Fret 19: A
Fret 20: Bb

G string (thinnest string):

Fret 1: G#
Fret 2: A
Fret 3: Bb
Fret 4: B
Fret 5: C
Fret 6: C#
Fret 7: D
Fret 8: D#
Fret 9: E
Fret 10: F
Fret 11: F#
Fret 12: G
Fret 13: G#
Fret 14: A
Fret 15: Bb
Fret 16: B
Fret 17: C
Fret 18: C#
Fret 19: D
Fret 20: D#

Easier way to look at the notes:

G| G# A Bb B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A Bb B C C# D C#
D| D# E F F# G G# A Bb B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A Bb
A| Bb B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A Bb B C C# D D# E F
E| F F# G G# A Bb B C C# D D# E F F# G G# A Bb B C

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
#2
Uh...this isn't really much of a lesson. Why not just make it simpler and state that there's a pattern that repeats itself? That's how it should be thought of as - not "this specific fret is this specific note".
#5
You need to make this easier. Try throwing in some things for finding notes from a relative postition. What I mean is like

|--------------------|
|---4---------------| Those would be the same notes
|--------------------|
|---2----------------|

|------------------| This is five notes above
|------------------|
|--2--------------|
|--0--------------|

Stuff like that. So if the person knows a note on the fret board they can find others around it by using little rules like that. I know I explained it ****tily
#6
^^ Ah, well, ok then. Still, I'd point out that these aren't really 80 different notes, but rather a chromatic scale of 12 notes that repeats itself. Conceptually, this is a better way for beginners to recieve this information
#7
Wouldn't a diagram be 1 million times more simple?
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#8
Wouldnt it be a lot easier to just say it goes a, a#, b, c, c#.... g# and then repeats itself, and if you know the name of the string you can therefore find what any note is in a lot less time than it takes to get on a computer and look up the lesson?
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#9
Quote by Maj_Tom
You need to make this easier. Try throwing in some things for finding notes from a relative postition. What I mean is like

|--------------------|
|---4---------------| Those would be the same notes
|--------------------|
|---2----------------|

|------------------| This is five notes above
|------------------|
|--2--------------|
|--0--------------|

Stuff like that. So if the person knows a note on the fret board they can find others around it by using little rules like that. I know I explained it ****tily


Yeah I spose I could've done that, but it could be a bit confusing for beginners. but i could say it as "to find the same note but different pitches, go down two strings and two frets on the right".

Then again, this is my first lesson, but I might do another one soon that's similar to this one.
#10
Fret Note
0 E A D G
1 F Bb Eb Ab
2 F# B E A
3 G C F Bb
4 Ab C# F# B
5 A D G C
6 Bb Eb Ab C#
7 B E A D
8 C F Bb Eb
9 C# F# B E
10 D G C F
11 Eb Ab C# F#
12 E A D G
13 F Bb Eb Ab
14 F# B E A
15 G C F Bb
16 Ab C# F# B
17 A D G C
18 Bb Eb Ab C#
19 B E A D
20 C F Bb Eb

I made this a very long time ago for myself, you can use it but just make sure I'm credited for it. I've just copied and pasted from MS Word so the table doesn't actually show... But still it's a lot easier to follow.
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in my school
and she was like
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and i was all
omgelitist
'fawkofffffffffff'
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Last edited by CoolDudeMorgasm at Jul 21, 2006,
#11
Biggest problem with this: when people arent tuned EADG
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#12
Quote by invisible_man
Wouldn't a diagram be 1 million times more simple?

Yeah, just one bigass guitar neck diagram, with a note indicated in each fret. Much more convenient than that huge list that you have to scroll down.
It'd also be nice if you explained common intervals: octave, perfect fifth, perfect fourth, major & minor third, etc.
It's a good concept for a lesson, but it needs to be done in a much cleaner and more convenient fashion.