#1
I want to start improvising my own music but everytime i try it sounds like sh**..i dont noe very much on theory..i only took lessons for about 6 monthes and ive been playing for 8..can ne1 help me out on where i should start??o and BTW im into kinda mix between metal and punk music like A7X, Atreyu, some of the Used, MCR and a bit of Green Day( a mix of alot i noe but thats how i am) thnx in advance

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#2
Well, getting good at improvisation isn't rested necessarily in the hands of theory. It will help you get a better idea of what sounds good and what doesn't, but to make your improvs not sound like "****" then just practice. Keep improving as much as you can. One thing I like to do is listen to a song and improvise my own solos and fills (which, at my point in the journey of improv, still sound like **** ). It has helped me a lot though.

What do you know about theory?
#3
Im not sure if you mean lead parts or just rhythm?
If its rhythm its just a matter of stringing chords together to see what sounds good together and what doesn't, you will fairly quickly get the hang of knowing what chords sound good beside eachother and what feel they will produce.
For lead parts I always recommend the idea of arpeggiating the chords you are working with to produce a melody and work from there incorporating some different notes in as you go.
I suggest learning some scales and also if you have the means its always a good idea to record your improv so you have a reference to go back to, you'll be surprised how much you progress without realising it.
Best of luck and remember, practice,practice,practice!!!
#4
Use phrases..

Some points to making a good phrase:
Try starting or ending your phrase on the root note of your scale.
During chord changes, incorporate the root note of the chord into your phrase.
When you aren't playing directly over a chord change, use the dominant notes of the underlying chords to strengthen your phrase. I think cas already said this, but I am repeating it anyways.
Use all of your techniques, vibrato, hammerons/pulloffs, tapping, harmonics, etc. If you don't know a technique, then learn it.
Look for other scales to use. If the rhythm is three power chords, then your options are practically limitless as to what scale you can choose, provided that it is in key with the three chords.
Be melodic and make all of your notes count.
Practice. the more you play, the better you will get.
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#5
I dont know wot kirbyrockandroll is talking about i think for improv you deffinantly need theory but you also need a fell for the guitar and how to use the theory
maybe so...maybe so young one.

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#6
Quote by Mr.Loomis_shred
I dont know wot kirbyrockandroll is talking about i think for improv you deffinantly need theory but you also need a fell for the guitar and how to use the theory

I meant that just knowledge of theory (without practice, phrasing, etc.) isn't going to make you good at improvising. Just playing scales up and down isn't going to make it sound unique, you still have to know your guitar techniques and everything...not just theory
#7
'Improvising', especially on the spot, is the hardest thing to do as a musician. It takes years of knowing what notes sound good, and are in key etc, not months.

If you mean creating a piece, then a good way to get started is to work out a 'groove', and play it along to the beat.. A good way to do this is to mute the strings and hit them to a rhythm that sounds good to you, perhaps what you've heard, or something that reminds you from a TV or film, or something like that. You could even hit out a rhythm with your hands. And then after, just add the notes/chords (its probably easier hitting the muted strings on a guitar, because you can add notes in between). This works well with the pentatonic scale, as it most likely will sound decent. Throw in some power chords and you could have something.

Remember, its the notes that you 'dont' play that cause effect in music. Oh, and start off slowly, it takes years to sound good.
#8
alright thnx for all the help guys..i think i get it now..PRACTICE :P lol..im noe it might take years to be good not anticipating being good at this in a month..neways thnx alot guys.