#1
Your just improvising in a band situation and say your doing it in A Minor. Is there a difference in sound at all from its Major counterpart, C Major? So for example could you say RHCP - Californication is also in C Major as i know that it is played in A Minor or is that musically incorrect and why so?

I know that the scale patterns are different but what else?

Hope you understand lol wasn't sure how to word it. This relates to all Major and relative Minor Keys btw. A Minor was just used as an example.

Thanks
#2
the chords or arpeggios played as the rhythm behind the solo or lead is what separates the two...it may be difficult to differentiate the sound of a relative major and minor, but they are indeed very different...it depends on how you use them

what makes them sound different is the relation between the notes, not the notes themselves...if you take a look at the intervals in each of them you will see the difference
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#3
Because A Minor is the most prominant chord, we say that it's in the key of A Minor. The song starts and ends on an A Minor chord, which makes your ear hear this as the tonic or root note- A. If the chords in the song were to resolve to C, then you would say that the song is in C Major- the same chords would be used, but hte feel would be very different because of the relationship each chord has to its respective tonic note
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#4
The notes in the scale of A Minor are identical to the notes in C major. Yes the scale patterns are different if you are starting on the 6th string and starting on your root note. If you are in A Minor, you technically are in the key of C major as well. The only reason it will sound different is the note you start your scale or improvisation on, also the note you focus your improvisation on. Technically you are playing the same scale, but it really only differs where you start at. I hope that makes some sense...
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#5
Quote by riffer_raffer
The notes in the scale of A Minor are identical to the notes in C major. Yes the scale patterns are different if you are starting on the 6th string and starting on your root note. If you are in A Minor, you technically are in the key of C major as well. The only reason it will sound different is the note you start your scale or improvisation on, also the note you focus your improvisation on. Technically you are playing the same scale, but it really only differs where you start at. I hope that makes some sense...


i think you have the wrong idea...somebody can start on the 6th degree of a C major scale (A) and still sound like they're playing C major
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#6
Quote by axe_grinder247
i think you have the wrong idea...somebody can start on the 6th degree of a C major scale (A) and still sound like they're playing C major


True

If someone starts on the 6th of any major key it is the relative minor. So in fact, the person COULD be playing in the relative minor (or any such mode) but it all depends on the tonal center. Which really defeats the purpose of modes, because you can say your playing in C major, but if you gravitate towards A then you are playing in aeolian, or a D, the dorian.
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#7
The difference is the intervals between notes and what note(s) the song is usually based around, and resolution.

Play this:


[b]C major[/b]
e-----------------------------------------------------
b-----------------------0--1--------------------------
g----------------0--2---------------------------------
d-----0--2--3-----------------------------------------
a--3-------------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------------


Then play this:


[b]A minor[/b]
e-----------------------------------------------------
b-----------------------------------------------------
g------------------------0--2-------------------------
d-------------0--2--3---------------------------------
a--0--2--3--------------------------------------------
E-----------------------------------------------------


See how they use the same notes, but sound different because of the different intervals between notes?
#8
Quote by Hypnot1st
Which really defeats the purpose of modes, because you can say your playing in C major, but if you gravitate towards A then you are playing in aeolian, or a D, the dorian.
Explain this. I really want to hear your reasoning.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Explain this. I really want to hear your reasoning.



EDIT: I deleted my argument. The person below me said it well without my huge example paragraph.
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Last edited by Hypnot1st at Jul 23, 2006,
#10
I would call the major misconception here( and it is a huge misconception with thousands of musicians in my opinion,) the difference between scales and tonality.

A scale is a series of notes...a very mathematical thing that doesn't involve your ear or feelings.

A tonality is a definate sound that is created and felt ( using those scales.)


While scales are the method of achieving certain tonalities, so many players use the modal scales while never achieving the tonality of the mode they are using. You will not get a true dorian sound unless you really define the natural 6th and minor 3rd. Sure you can pass over those notes in a scale run, but unless they are really accented in your music, you might just be playing a major scale starting on the 2nd degree.

Often people focus on learnign these modes as scales, and never establishing that tonality. An easy suggestion is to begin this in a dorian tonality would be to try a progression like:

Imin IImin

Simple, but both needed elements of dorian are there.

Anyways, I'm rambling so, thanks for reading if you made it this far hehe.