#1
Okay... I think you will be able to explain this stuff me. I would appreciate it a lot.

Ok. Let's say we got a chord progression going on at a steady rhythym. A very common chord progression: G7, Em, Am, D

Now, I wanna improvise the lead guitar part, using the minor pentatonic scale. We must find the right key to play on... how do I find it out?

After we have found the key, how do I use the minor pentatonic scale to improvise? I mean, if the key is G (I don't know if it's correct, I'm just guessing it lol), then the scale will start in the third fret:

--------------------------3-6---
---------------------3-6--------
----------------3-5-------------
-----------3-5------------------
------3-5-----------------------
-3-6----------------------------


(Again, correct me if I'm wrong, I'm not sure about ANYTHING)

But if I try to improvise just using those frets, I feel the resulting solo to sound a bit tense, and I feel I'm boxed within those frets. How do I move along the fretboard?

I hope all this post is clear, English is not my first language. Please help me if you can
Quote by americnidiot
why the f*** does that guy have a KFC bucket on his head?


Quote by slashnmash
its buckethead dummy!
#2
go search for the hopscotch method in the UG lessons for how to move down the fret board, and when your soloing to different chords some notes will sound bad, just needs some experience, theres a brilliant google video about playing along to chords, but ive forgotten what it was called, im sure someone else knows what im talking abotu though.
songs: Left Behind choices
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#3
Quote by dnjoe
go search for the hopscotch method in the UG lessons for how to move down the fret board, and when your soloing to different chords some notes will sound bad, just needs some experience, theres a brilliant google video about playing along to chords, but ive forgotten what it was called, im sure someone else knows what im talking abotu though.


Melodic Control by Marty Friedman, perhaps?
#4
Quote by Metallica1989

Ok. Let's say we got a chord progression going on at a steady rhythym. A very common chord progression: G7, Em, Am, D

Now, I wanna improvise the lead guitar part, using the minor pentatonic scale. We must find the right key to play on... how do I find it out?


Well, the best cadence goes from V-I. This means that the 5th chord in a scale, resolves back to the first chord.
Or, Dominant resolves back to its tonic.

Ok, lets use an example. Your common progression: G7 Em Am D, lets make it simple, and change the G7 to just G. (which is fine because the basic triad stays the same).

Ok, you should know what the chord progression for the Major scale is, if you dont, just ask and i can explain it.

A Major scale chord progression goes: I ii iii IV V vi vii° I, or in easy terms: Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Diminished.

Ok, If we take the G Major scale we have the notes: G A B C D E F# G.
If we apply the chord progression over these notes we get this:

G Major
A Minor
B Minor
C Major
D Major
E Minor
F# Diminished.

Now, look at what i first said about the V-I cadence. Look at your chord progression, the first chord, and the last chord.
The last chord is a D Major. Find that on the Major scale chord progression above, and its the 5th chord in the sequence. This dominantly resolves back to the Tonic, or the I chord, which is G Major.

Therefore, G is your tonic, and your Root / key.


After we have found the key, how do I use the minor pentatonic scale to improvise? I mean, if the key is G (I don't know if it's correct, I'm just guessing it lol), then the scale will start in the third fret:


Ok, lets start with an easy scale to start with. The most "in your face" scale for this chord progression is, of course, the G Major scale. So lets write a small tab, with the chords you listed over the G Major scale:


    I         vi      ii    V   I
    G         Em      Am    D   G
e|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
G|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
D|------------[b]2[/b]--------------------|------------[b]E[/b]--------------------|
A|------2-3-5---5-3-2---2-3-[b]5[/b]------|------B-C-D---D-C-B---B-C-[b]D[/b]------|
E|--[b]3[/b]-5---------------[b]5[/b]-------5-[b]3[/b]--|--[b]G[/b]-A---------------[b]A[/b]-------A-[b]G[/b]--|


This is a very simple progression based on the G Major scale, over a G Major chord progression.

You can jazz it up, but ill show you later if you want me to.
(I dont have time right now, but later when i get a chance, ill explain improvisation over the pentatonics and so on, although if you study that tab above, you might be able to work it out on your own).

I feel I'm boxed within those frets. How do I move along the fretboard?


Ok, lets stop looking at scales as boxes and more like separate notes. Look at the notes of the major scale: G A B C D E F# G.

Also, compare these notes to the tab above. Look at how, in the tab, I play a G note ontop of a G Major chord. I then ASCEND, or go up through these notes up to the next chords root note; E. Therefore, I play an E note ontop of the Em Chord.

The next chord goes DOWN to an Am. Therefore, i go down the scale to the A note and play it over the Am chord. And so on.

If you play these notes, ANYWHERE on the fretboard, your still playing in key, and in the same scale. You can use this method to make your solos / improvisations sound random / melodic / etc etc.

Sorry ive not explained it very well, but im kinda time-restricted. Ill try explain it better later, if you have any questions, ask away.
Been away, am back
#5
The Key of G(Chords)
I ii iii IV  V  vi vii°  I
G Am Bm  C   D  Em F#dim  G


so G7, Em, Am, D are in the key of G. If you want to solo over that, you don't have to stick to that scale that you showed. You can use the notes G,A,B,C,D,E, and F# anywhere on the fretboard.

EDIT: dammit Logz. . .

EDIT2: Eh, I take that back, it was slightly helpful to me.
Last edited by R0CKER1220 at Jul 22, 2006,
#6
Quote by R0CKER1220
The Key of G(Chords)
I II III IV V VI VII I


almost:
I ii iii IV V vi vii° I

EDIT:
My bad
Been away, am back
#8
Quote by R0CKER1220
^I don't know how to get the little diminished sign on my computer, and the "II III VI VII" was just a stupid mistake. I'm still new-ish to Theory.


° = Alt + 0176.
#10
Quote by R0CKER1220
^It's not working for me


lol. Everyone was new to theory once Im still learning alot!

for the diminished sign, like john said:

Alt + 0176

you need to hold down the ALT button and press 0176 separatly.

If you still cant do it, click on start > Run > charmap.
It'll be in there somewhere.
Been away, am back
#12
Quote by R0CKER1220
^It still won't work. I hold down ALT then hit 0 then 1 and it goes bac kto the forums index. Then I went to start > run > charmap and it says windows can not find it.


The same happens with me when I use FireFox.

Try going to Start > All Programs > Accesories > System Tools > Character Map. Try finding it there, then use the copy and paste option.
#14
Quote by Logz
Well, the best cadence goes from V-I. This means that the 5th chord in a scale, resolves back to the first chord.
Or, Dominant resolves back to its tonic.

Ok, lets use an example. Your common progression: G7 Em Am D, lets make it simple, and change the G7 to just G. (which is fine because the basic triad stays the same).

Ok, you should know what the chord progression for the Major scale is, if you dont, just ask and i can explain it.

A Major scale chord progression goes: I ii iii IV V vi vii° I, or in easy terms: Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Diminished.

Ok, If we take the G Major scale we have the notes: G A B C D E F# G.
If we apply the chord progression over these notes we get this:

G Major
A Minor
B Minor
C Major
D Major
E Minor
F# Diminished.

Now, look at what i first said about the V-I cadence. Look at your chord progression, the first chord, and the last chord.
The last chord is a D Major. Find that on the Major scale chord progression above, and its the 5th chord in the sequence. This dominantly resolves back to the Tonic, or the I chord, which is G Major.

Therefore, G is your tonic, and your Root / key.


Ok, lets start with an easy scale to start with. The most "in your face" scale for this chord progression is, of course, the G Major scale. So lets write a small tab, with the chords you listed over the G Major scale:


I vi ii V I
G Em Am D G
e|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
G|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
D|------------[b]2[/b]--------------------|------------[b]E[/b]--------------------|
A|------2-3-5---5-3-2---2-3-[b]5[/b]------|------B-C-D---D-C-B---B-C-[b]D[/b]------|
E|--[b]3[/b]-5---------------[b]5[/b]-------5-[b]3[/b]--|--[b]G[/b]-A---------------[b]A[/b]-------A-[b]G[/b]--|


This is a very simple progression based on the G Major scale, over a G Major chord progression.

You can jazz it up, but ill show you later if you want me to.
(I dont have time right now, but later when i get a chance, ill explain improvisation over the pentatonics and so on, although if you study that tab above, you might be able to work it out on your own).


Ok, lets stop looking at scales as boxes and more like separate notes. Look at the notes of the major scale: G A B C D E F# G.

Also, compare these notes to the tab above. Look at how, in the tab, I play a G note ontop of a G Major chord. I then ASCEND, or go up through these notes up to the next chords root note; E. Therefore, I play an E note ontop of the Em Chord.

The next chord goes DOWN to an Am. Therefore, i go down the scale to the A note and play it over the Am chord. And so on.

If you play these notes, ANYWHERE on the fretboard, your still playing in key, and in the same scale. You can use this method to make your solos / improvisations sound random / melodic / etc etc.

Sorry ive not explained it very well, but im kinda time-restricted. Ill try explain it better later, if you have any questions, ask away.



Wow, dude EXCELLENT post. I learn't some new things myself.
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Jackson RR3
Jackson WRMG

Quote by madbasslover
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I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
#15
Quote by Logz
Well, the best cadence goes from V-I. This means that the 5th chord in a scale, resolves back to the first chord.
Or, Dominant resolves back to its tonic.

Ok, lets use an example. Your common progression: G7 Em Am D, lets make it simple, and change the G7 to just G. (which is fine because the basic triad stays the same).

Ok, you should know what the chord progression for the Major scale is, if you dont, just ask and i can explain it.

A Major scale chord progression goes: I ii iii IV V vi vii° I, or in easy terms: Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Diminished.

Ok, If we take the G Major scale we have the notes: G A B C D E F# G.
If we apply the chord progression over these notes we get this:

G Major
A Minor
B Minor
C Major
D Major
E Minor
F# Diminished.

Now, look at what i first said about the V-I cadence. Look at your chord progression, the first chord, and the last chord.
The last chord is a D Major. Find that on the Major scale chord progression above, and its the 5th chord in the sequence. This dominantly resolves back to the Tonic, or the I chord, which is G Major.

Therefore, G is your tonic, and your Root / key.


Ok, lets start with an easy scale to start with. The most "in your face" scale for this chord progression is, of course, the G Major scale. So lets write a small tab, with the chords you listed over the G Major scale:


I vi ii V I
G Em Am D G
e|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
B|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
G|---------------------------------|---------------------------------|
D|------------[b]2[/b]--------------------|------------[b]E[/b]--------------------|
A|------2-3-5---5-3-2---2-3-[b]5[/b]------|------B-C-D---D-C-B---B-C-[b]D[/b]------|
E|--[b]3[/b]-5---------------[b]5[/b]-------5-[b]3[/b]--|--[b]G[/b]-A---------------[b]A[/b]-------A-[b]G[/b]--|


This is a very simple progression based on the G Major scale, over a G Major chord progression.

You can jazz it up, but ill show you later if you want me to.
(I dont have time right now, but later when i get a chance, ill explain improvisation over the pentatonics and so on, although if you study that tab above, you might be able to work it out on your own).


Ok, lets stop looking at scales as boxes and more like separate notes. Look at the notes of the major scale: G A B C D E F# G.

Also, compare these notes to the tab above. Look at how, in the tab, I play a G note ontop of a G Major chord. I then ASCEND, or go up through these notes up to the next chords root note; E. Therefore, I play an E note ontop of the Em Chord.

The next chord goes DOWN to an Am. Therefore, i go down the scale to the A note and play it over the Am chord. And so on.

If you play these notes, ANYWHERE on the fretboard, your still playing in key, and in the same scale. You can use this method to make your solos / improvisations sound random / melodic / etc etc.

Sorry ive not explained it very well, but im kinda time-restricted. Ill try explain it better later, if you have any questions, ask away.


****... thanks for that explanation
Quote by americnidiot
why the f*** does that guy have a KFC bucket on his head?


Quote by slashnmash
its buckethead dummy!
#16
BTW... I'm pretty new to theory... Well I don't know anything about it to be precise. Most of the stuff in your post seems unclear to me but I understood some of it.

Maybe you know where I should start learning theory? I mean... I suppose that you must know something before learning the next part. But where to start?
Quote by americnidiot
why the f*** does that guy have a KFC bucket on his head?


Quote by slashnmash
its buckethead dummy!
#17
Lol, if you need explaining some stuff, i can always help as best as i can, or you can use the Musicians forum for help. That has some awesome users which help out a lot with music theory.

If your a beginner at theory, try learning about the major scale, as this is the building blocks of loads of other things.

After that, learn about intervals, scales, modes, then chord construction, chord progressions, chord progressions over modes, improv.

This is a very broad list of things to learn, and i might have missed some stuff out.
But like i said, if you need help, just ask away

Been away, am back
#18
lol

I always find your posts helpful thanks
Quote by americnidiot
why the f*** does that guy have a KFC bucket on his head?


Quote by slashnmash
its buckethead dummy!