#1
Hey

How much would it cost to tune a second hand Piano in the UK roughly?
Also, how often would you have to tune it?
#2
I think my friend gets his piano tuned for $100?. . .

You don't need to tune it that often, I think it's once every few years. (I think.)
#3
Don't know what the cost in the UK is... for a home piano you can tune it once or twice a year.
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#4
If the UK has a giant phonebook/directory just look up local listings there. Otherwise, all I can tell you is that the cost will be what the piano tuner requires .
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#5
I've been noticing that in the past few months two or three critical thinking problems have asked me variations on the question, "How many piano tuners are there in NYC?" I have no idea why a piano tuner would be chosen.

My friends with non-electric pianos don't get the piano tuned often... but I would probably do once or twice a year, as Corwinoid recommends. They claim there isn't a difference, but it is easily noticeable.
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#6
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How much would it cost to tune a second hand Piano in the UK roughly?
I have no idea what it might cost in the UK. Here in the southern U.S. the price varies from about $75 for a straight-ahead tuning (A-440) up to about $125 for a pitch correction and tuning.
Also, how often would you have to tune it?
Ideally you should tune your piano about two weeks after every change of season. Bear in mind that playing is not the primary cause of a piano going out of tune. Instead, it's change in humidity. Most significant shifts in the air's moisture content occur when the seasons change, with the overall pitch of the piano following the humidity level. In other words, as the humidity rises (during the spring and summer here in the southern US) the pitch of the piano rises, and as the humidity falls (autumn and winter) the pitch of the piano falls. The trouble is that the overall pitch almost always falls slightly farther in the fall and winter than it rises during the spring and fall. That's why really badly out-of-tune pianos are almost invariably far below A-440 instead of above standard pitch.

This is probably a lot more detail than you wanted. The short answer is: Ideally you should tune your piano about two weeks after every change of season.
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#7
I think how often you tune it completely depends on the climate and environment it's kept in along with how often it's played.

I play often and get it tuned by a technician every 6 months for £60.