#1
what equipment might I need to record studio quality vocals? Obviously, a good microphone, but even then, I'm kind of clueless as to what I'd be looking for. Also, what other equipment would I need, as in, what do I need so that when I sing louder and softer I won't have to lean closer or farther from the microphone?
#2
when you do studio recording, stay as close to the mic as possible with a pop/spit guard. Get some sort of tube pre amp for the vocals, a nice condenser mic, and some sort of compression, and youll have some great vocals.
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#3
Yeah, that's pretty much it! If you can't afford / don't have a pop shield then you can make one by bending a coat-hanger into an "O" shape about 15cm in diameter and then stretching a pair of tights over it and cutting off any excess. It's basically the same thing!
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#4
yeah, I've heard of the coathager and tights thing before, and thats probably what I'd use for a pop filter.

As far as mics go, would a condenser in the $100-$200 range be sufficient?
Oh, and when you say compression, all I can think of is that Boss compression sustainer stompbox for guitar. See, I'm totally clueless! I don't know what to look for at all. Fruity loops has a pretty nice compressor, but the only computer I own that will run it is my laptop, which has a horrid soundcard, and a broken headphone output.
#5
Quote by joshfrazier
yeah, I've heard of the coathager and tights thing before, and thats probably what I'd use for a pop filter.

As far as mics go, would a condenser in the $100-$200 range be sufficient?
Oh, and when you say compression, all I can think of is that Boss compression sustainer stompbox for guitar. See, I'm totally clueless! I don't know what to look for at all. Fruity loops has a pretty nice compressor, but the only computer I own that will run it is my laptop, which has a horrid soundcard, and a broken headphone output.


The best vocal mic I know of is a Sure SM58, i think it retails at about £120 (about $220US) but you can get t online for much less. As for you Laptop, either upgrade it
so it is firewire compatable and get a decent audio interface. You might be better off getting a new computer as the next gen laptops are about to be released so prices will be dropping soon.
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#6
Chances are the SM58 will not give you the sound you are looking for. You'll definitely want a condensor mic. Umm... MXL has some decent sounding mics in that price range, and you'll probably be satified with something like that. You'll probably get a sound that you like more from an MXL 990 even that the SM58. But condensor mics don't really start to get their own unique character unless you break $300-400. If you are willing to invest that then the KSM-27 was my first and it has pretty accurate reproduction, it would be good choice. You'll want some kind of decent audio interface and software (your preference really, you can get a good beginning setup for about $300-400 and there are lots out there, M-box 2 for example). The interface will probably have preamps and the software should have some form of compression. To get an okay rack tube pre/compressor would cost around $350 (The ART pro channel would be pretty good as something entry level). Anything cheaper is really a waste and you probably don't need one to start out anyway.
Last edited by brandnewjunkie at Jul 23, 2006,
#7
^ i agree. An sm58 is a great live vocal mic. In studio conditions, it lacks the depth and clarity of a condenser mic. Keep in mind as well, that with a condeser mic, youll need to look into phantom power, some have their own battery to power itself, but you may need a mixer with phantom power capability (its very common, most should have phantom power). Ive seen some pretty decent condenser mics in the $200 range, i think it shoudl be sufficient if you are just starting out. You can also look into some recording programs that include digital compression. Ive done that on a few demos ive done for other bands when im not in my own space. It gets the job done, and for great demos, it works nicely.
http://www.theweekendkids.com

Gibson Les Paul Studio w/dirtyfingers pickups
Gibson Joan Jett Melody Maker
VOX ac30 head
Marshall 1960 4x12 cab
Fender Hot Rod Deville