#1
Hey I recently got into doing nothing but trying to create my own songs on the guitar. I think I have come up with some alright riffs but I have had very little success in creating an entire song. I can come up with something and I'll tell myself that will be the chorus or verse but then I can't connect anything to it smoothly, how do you do that? Any tips?
#2
build riffs off each other
like take a verse riff, and as youre about to change, think of what you would expect to hear, and play it

also work on fills, just little notes in between phrases
Quote by beadhangingOne
There is no music but metal and muhammad is its prophet.
#3
Well here's what I do. Let's say I right a riff. Then I write another and end up thinking, "Oh, darn...this doesn't fit with my other riff!". So what I do is "store" both riffs in my head or write them down and remember them. That way, when I do find a riff that fits, I'll be able to recall that first riff and put them together.
#4
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Well here's what I do. Let's say I right a riff. Then I write another and end up thinking, "Oh, darn...this doesn't fit with my other riff!". So what I do is "store" both riffs in my head or write them down and remember them. That way, when I do find a riff that fits, I'll be able to recall that first riff and put them together.


Very good advice take this to heart! Many times I will be working on a blues song for example and accidentally come up with a great sounding metal riff. Instead of trying to weakly incorporate it into the song, write it down, and save it for later.

When thinking up a song, always write down the structure. For example,

Intro Riff --> Verse riff --> Chorus riff -->
Verse Riff --> Interlude / Solo riff --> Chorus / Outro


From there, try applying your riff to a certain section of the song then play around with it. The best way to get a feel for these songs is to just listen to other songs and get a feel for what professional artists do. Choruses are usually either a simple variation of the riff or a short chord progression.

Anyway, good luck
#5
This is all good advice.

Another thing I want to mention for all the songwriters out there who have the benefit of playing with a drummer or bassist. Usually the bass and drums are the first tracks layed down in a studio, and they often choose the progression. If you have a good bassist and/or drummer, its rather easy to "switch", because they choose the basic rhythm and chord for you, all you have to do is let the creativity flow (while constrained to these minor guidelines).