#1
Does anyone know of any websites, dvds, or books that help teach jazz playing that do not require knowledge of notes (for example with tabs or just a list of useful scales that show fretboard position instead of just notes on a staff)? Of course, any tips of your own would be much appreciated also.

Thanks in advance.
what is the music theory and what does it teach you, like scales, solos, and to build speed???



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Last edited by Viruk at Jul 25, 2006,
#2
a.) Not really, there are some tabs on here by jazz artists I guess. For scales, learn your major scale modes in particular. You can't do everything with them, but they're a good starting point.

b.) Why not learn notes? There are plenty of lessons online, and the best jazz resources I've found online use standard notation.
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#3
Well, I can read notes but it takes me a while to translate the fretboard and it really seems like a bother. I will take your suggestion and begin working on it, but until I get some practice with simpler things I'd rather find something with tabs.

Major scales... got it.
what is the music theory and what does it teach you, like scales, solos, and to build speed???



Check out my recordings
#4
Well, my senior year of highschool, i went into Jazz Band. And somehow, i got lead guitar. i didn't know THAT many chords or scales, but i quickly learned. see, all you got to learn for now, are your chords. practice practice and PRACTICE!!!


ex: Amaj7..Amin7......Amin.....Adim.........etc...start off learning barre chordes. and all the formes that make the maj7, min, etc. leanr your positions and stuff. then, learn your major scales! lol. depending on the jazz, you will use major or minot pentatonic scales(at least for the beginner, "jazz people" want you to know every note you can play and when, and it gets crazy"

but anyway. just go to google, search major scales and minor pentatonic. learn all the notes, all the way up the fret board, and take note that each scale has a key. if you play a Gmaj chord, you can play the Gmaj scale.

it get more complicated then that, but it will give u a head ache... so just start off with this

i hope this helps!
#5
this is a good website, featuring some cool licks of great players:

http://www.jazzguitar.be/

they're in tab and note form, so you can play them right away, but it will also help you associate tab/position with actual notation.

past that, start transcribing. that's a great way to learn.
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Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#6
Quote by Viruk
Major scales... got it.


lol, I meant modes of the major scale. Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian would have been enough for me in jazz band, although I mixed in a few others.
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#8
to give a little more focus, the most common by far of the above you will be using are the dorian, mixo, and ionian scales. learn those first, up and down and inside out, then go on to the others.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#10
Just learn notes, it's not that hard. You'll need it for the fakebooks. Learn the popular jazz chords, once you know the form, you can move it around anywhere. Learn the modes of major scales, and learn arpeggios. I guess you can search google or UG for this stuff....
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...Scales are basically the most useless thing in jazz...

#11
Learning jazz without learning theory is ridiculous. The center of jazz, I would say, is the beautiful effort of improvisation. In order to do that you must know your theory. Charles Mingus once said that he didn't look at his album, Mingus Ah Um, as a true jazz album because almost all of the parts were written out.

Learn improvisation. Learn theory. You'll be happy you did.
If everyone liked what I did, I probably wouldn't be playing anything of depth.

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