#2
maple is brighter and smoother

rosewood is darker

its just a preference, doesnt really affect playing
#4
I feel uncomfortable playing on maple fretboards, and the fact that i've just bought a strat with rosewood fretboard instead of a maple one has nothing to do with sound. Maybe its just me, but i feel playability is affected by the type of fretboard...
#5
^Well there's different kinds of maple finishes, a poor finish could be a little sticky. This has little to nothing to do with the actual maple wood though.
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


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#6
Quote by elliotgardiner
Maple looks nice but feels kind of different as far as i can tell.. maybe it was just my friend's guitar I wasnt used to.

But some rosewoods are really horrible and dark and dull. Sometimes you get a really nice colourful one. e.g. on my BC Rich. It was probably the decider for me between that guitar and some LTD piece of crap


i love how you can call LTD piece of crap when your talking about it compared to a BC Rich
#9
Maple has an unplesant feel to me it's really slick unless the finish is just perfect. and they have the really bright yellowey look to them. Rosewood has the warm almost black look, and plays really smoothe and dosent look bad when it stars to wear. Maple looks bad when it stars to wear.
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#10
Maple Fretboards are famous for the speed of a maple Neck

Rosewood Fretboards are I suppose known for their tone...I guess you get a little bit of a different tone...

Ebony Necks/Fretboards are known for their Sustain

I Prefer Maple necks/Fretboards...but looking at the 8 Guitars that I own at the moment only a couple of them have a maple Neck...& my #1 Guitar at the moment (my Jackson PRO Randy Rhoads RR3 Flying V) has a Rosewood Board......
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Randy Rhoads (December 6, 1956 – March 19, 1982)
Dimebag Darrell (August 20, 1966 – December 8, 2004)
Les Paul (June 9, 1915 – August 13, 2009)
Ronnie James Dio (July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010)
#11
Birdsye Maple All The Way

I think maple is a softer colour, it luks great, and i find it easyer to play than rosewood. i have a start in maple and rosewood but for some reson i prefere the maple to play on ..
#13
I prefer the darker fretboards, the only guitar with a maple fretboard I've owned was horrible to solo on so thats put me off maple until i try a good one with maple cos it was really horrible
#14
Maple fretboards have very tight grain. The resulting feel is very smooth (if finished well). Rosewood fretboards have a different feel to them since they have a much more open grain and are usually unfinished. Also, rosewood is more difficult to maintain. Maple you just clean with guitar polish.
Hi, I'm Peter
#15
Quote by Mazz-
Maple Fretboards are famous for the speed of a maple Neck

Rosewood Fretboards are I suppose known for their tone...I guess you get a little bit of a different tone...

Ebony Necks/Fretboards are known for their Sustain

I Prefer Maple necks/Fretboards...but looking at the 8 Guitars that I own at the moment only a couple of them have a maple Neck...& my #1 Guitar at the moment (my Jackson PRO Randy Rhoads RR3 Flying V) has a Rosewood Board......



Wierd... my guitar is maple (maple body and neck) with an ebony fretboard... my fretboard is the fastest i've ever played on, however, it's not got the greatest sustain..

Peavey has a "PolyGlide" coating over my fretboard, it feels kinda like a plasticy coating i guess. Either way, it looks nice, and plays incredible.
#17
Rosewood is also usually flatter. Maple usually has a slight curve, which can throw some people off. I like it, but only on a strat. Im more of a Rosewood kinda guy though.
#18
umm...the curve of the fretboard has nothing to do with the material it's made of.
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#19
I didn't say it has anything to do with what it's made of, I said Maple usually has a slight curve. usually being the key word. Especially with he 1980 Fender/Squier necks. I haven't seen a rosewood neck with as much curvature (sp?) as a Maple.

Anyway, it's not really for anybody to decide, you just have to play the guitar and see if you like it. And by playing, don't go pick it up for 5 minutes. Sit there and play it for an hour if you have to, leave and then go back to it a few days later.
#20
Quote by elliotgardiner
Maple looks nice but feels kind of different as far as i can tell.. maybe it was just my friend's guitar I wasnt used to.

But some rosewoods are really horrible and dark and dull. Sometimes you get a really nice colourful one. e.g. on my BC Rich. It was probably the decider for me between that guitar and some LTD piece of crap


..... you play a BC rich.... you lose.
#21
hes also basing his entire answer around looks, and doesnt factor in sound too..so he loses again..or still..or whatever
Go get your shovel.
#22
Quote by Eeriedessswirl
I didn't say it has anything to do with what it's made of, I said Maple usually has a slight curve. usually being the key word. Especially with he 1980 Fender/Squier necks. I haven't seen a rosewood neck with as much curvature (sp?) as a Maple.

Anyway, it's not really for anybody to decide, you just have to play the guitar and see if you like it. And by playing, don't go pick it up for 5 minutes. Sit there and play it for an hour if you have to, leave and then go back to it a few days later.

Fender guitars, especially older ones, have a very small fretboard radius (7"). If you looked at a rosewood fretboard from the same year, it would have the same curve. Fretboards are curved on purpose. If you're comparing different makes, that won't work, because each one curves their fretboards differently.
Hi, I'm Peter