#1
I would think that you should practice playing without looking at your fingers, since you want to get to a point where you can play without looking... but I've read in the Guitar Principles book that you should always be looking at your fingers when you're practicing, to make sure that your technique is correct.

Soo... which is right? Should you do a combination of both; spend part of your practice session not looking and part of it looking?
#2
you shiouldnt if you read music
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#3
Just watch your fingers when you play. It subconsciously forces you to remember where the frets are. So when you jam with other guitarists you can watch what theyre playing and so forth. It doesnt hurt.


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#4
It depends on what song you're playing, if the song is hard or you've just learned it, you don't have a choice but to look at your fingers, other wise you would sound like president bush playing guitar drunk, if it's easy or you're not new to the song, then you don't have to, but once in a while, glance to make it sound perfect.

happy playing!
#5
I don't think visually looking at your fingers is really a must or must not... when you're playing, what your fingers are doing isn't a big part of what's happening in that moment of time, it's about what's coming out the other end and how you're interpreting it, the feeling, emotion and just playing.

But yeah, I'd think practicing is different, but again - I don't think it's a visual thing unless you really need to be paying attention to what your form looks like from a perfect world point of view, if you're trying to correct a certain flaw where one of your fingers erects too far to be able to play proficiently, visually seeing that finger is obviously going to help determine whether or not it's behaving or not.

But aside from that, I always look at my fingers, but hardly ever visually, it's more a feeling and sense. I can sense tension without having to look at my fingers tense up, I can sense whether or not my finger is fretting on the correct part of the tip without looking at it.

Full awareness is definitely being visually, physically and mentally aware of what you're doing and that is always part of my practice as a strict routine, but for me - the physical and mental aspect of it is far more important than just looking.
#6
When I watch my fingers I can play a song better and learn it faster because I know where my fingers go physically. On tabs I have to think for a split second where one fret is in relation to the next, which isn't complicated but when I see my fingers do it I learn faster.
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#7
you should start by looking at your fingers while you practice and then move on to not looking,
the reason why is your hands dont have eyes but once you teach them how to do something or where something is they can then do it on their own. its all about developing your technique and skill making sure that you play somethin right rather than hiting wrong notes and such
the no looking is just for bragging rights.
#8
at first, you need to look at them, to make sure you're developing good technique, getting used to putting the fingers in the right spot next to the fret, playing on the tips of the fingers. As you progress, if you want to play without looking, make sure you can play well and accurately first.
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#9
Quote by Johnljones7443
I don't think visually looking at your fingers is really a must or must not... when you're playing, what your fingers are doing isn't a big part of what's happening in that moment of time, it's about what's coming out the other end and how you're interpreting it, the feeling, emotion and just playing.

But yeah, I'd think practicing is different, but again - I don't think it's a visual thing unless you really need to be paying attention to what your form looks like from a perfect world point of view, if you're trying to correct a certain flaw where one of your fingers erects too far to be able to play proficiently, visually seeing that finger is obviously going to help determine whether or not it's behaving or not.

But aside from that, I always look at my fingers, but hardly ever visually, it's more a feeling and sense. I can sense tension without having to look at my fingers tense up, I can sense whether or not my finger is fretting on the correct part of the tip without looking at it.

Full awareness is definitely being visually, physically and mentally aware of what you're doing and that is always part of my practice as a strict routine, but for me - the physical and mental aspect of it is far more important than just looking.


dang man...you're a genious