#1
How would we go on about this? I was assuming using a Shure Beta 58 Mic and putting it on a mic-stand. Then face the mic at my right corner speaker in my cabinet. When we play back the recording,will the recording sound like a lot of static due to the loudness of the amp?
FlickR
iBanez Rg550 20th Anniversary.
iBanez GRG170DX W/ Dimarzio Steve's Special
VTM 60 Tube Head
Carvin Legacy Vai Cabinet 4x12 Cabinet
Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive
ZW-44 Overdrive
Zakk Wylde Signiture Wah
#2
Use a Shure SM57, way better. There's shouldn't be tons of static, but if there is, turn down the input on whatever you're using to record.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#3
Thats all we got and some akg , but the AKGs arent as good as the shure's.
FlickR
iBanez Rg550 20th Anniversary.
iBanez GRG170DX W/ Dimarzio Steve's Special
VTM 60 Tube Head
Carvin Legacy Vai Cabinet 4x12 Cabinet
Boss SD-1 Super Overdrive
ZW-44 Overdrive
Zakk Wylde Signiture Wah
#4
shoudl be fine, dont put the mic right up against the cab, and you dont need to put it top right. You should play around with mic placement to get the sound you are going for. You might also have to change the dials on your amp to achieve the tone you want. Studio sounds and live sounds are two different things, generally, you use less gain in studio situations.

Theres this great thing called Pink Noise, it basically plays all audible freqeunciess to the human ears. Our engineer used it to find the right placement for the mics in order to get the right mix of lows mids and highs that we were looking for. Experiment, and a 58 shoudl be fine, however, the 57 would be choice. Anyway, good luck
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Gibson Les Paul Studio w/dirtyfingers pickups
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