#1
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I just relized the difference between major and minor penatonic scales. I ve been playing around with the minor scale and relized that if im playing in the key of A, i can play a solo, and then start playing 5 ferts higher and it will still sounds good. Why is that?
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#3
Another thing you may try is to play a pentatonic scale, and move it three frets down. If i'm correct that makes it the major pentatonic scale.
#4
Quote by Bullet FMV
Another thing you may try is to play a pentatonic scale, and move it three frets down. If i'm correct that makes it the major pentatonic scale.

moving Am three frets down would make it F#m, which is the relative minor of A major. So playing A major, then moving it down to F#m would sound pretty close. Because they have the same notes.
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#6
Yep, thats how my teacher taught me the major/minor scales.
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#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It sounds good because you're playing a mode.

You can't move it down 3 frets. That makes it major. You don't want that.


depends on the song.some songs you can switch back and forth and the both sound fine. lenny by SRV is like that. you can switch between e major and minor. major sounds a little more sad and emotional while the minor sounds like it has more attitude. not all songs can do that though.
#9
Yes in theory, Am pent = F#maj pent but there are subtle differences. In an AM run you would say play the D on the 3rd fret of the B string where you wouldn't play that in F# usually.

Yes I know some chord changes within F# can enable you to add the D sometimes when it suits. That's improvising between scales to make you a good player rather than adopting the "one scale fits all" approach to soloing.

Play Jimmis/SRV versions of little wing to see that style.