#1
Ok I've been playing maybe 3 yrs or less. Ive been practicing SONGS from Metallica, Pantera, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Van Halen, Steve Vai, and Guns&Roses. And I think I'm not practicing the right stuff. So can someone tell me what do I need to really PRACTICE? Thanks
#2
chili peppers is the only one out of those tht u should be practicing at ur level unless u have been takin lessons for 3 yrs then i guess u could try some of dime's stuff
The 60s are gone, dope will never be as cheap, sex never as free, and the rock and roll never as great.
#3
practice whatever you wanna practice learn the what ya wanna learn if ya feel it's hard or complicated just start off slow and then speed it up if ya feel it's not complicated enough move on the harder stuff
#4
Why do you think you're not practicing the right stuff? Because you still can't play it right? Because if you can, then you're doing just fine! I would suggest picking ONE song that you think speed-wise and technique-wise isn't out of your ability and practice that one song over and over and over, really slow sometimes, full speed sometimes, paying attention to all the little nuances and subtleties that you notice from hearing it over and over, until you have 100% MASTERED the song and believe you can play it as well as anybody.
#5
No I dont want to learn anyones songs no more. I can already play songs perfectly from the bands I listed. I want to create my own stuff now. It just got boring playing other peoples music. I want to learn theory and all that good stuff like Steve Vai, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, and Buckethead. But the problem is I dont know what to practice to lead me to making my own music. Like people say practice scales. Well no one explains it like say the notes out loud or make a quick solo using 3 notes? I just want a good explanation with what to practice. Thanks.
#6
If you can't make your own music and you can play songs by Pantera, Steve Vai, and Van Halen then I don't know what can help you!
#7
Ok I'll try to put it on easy terms. I want make my own songs. But I dont get what to practice. Like practice scales, but how do you really get the full effect practicing scales besides just playing them like 3-5-7. Thanks for putting up with my problem.
#8
Play the scales, and then take those scales and use them in your own songs. Write songs bassed off the notes, and write chords using those notes. If you keep playing the same notes with different chords, the whole writing process will become much easier.

Learn and memorize the scales and modes. That doesn't mean just know how to play them. Know what each one sounds like, and what feeling it has. Also know how to relate the scale's positions and notes to one another. For example, know how you get from a Lydian mode to a Dorian mode, and what the notes have in common to one another (the order, etc.) Really know the scales/modes inside and out. If you play guitar, learn your chords as well (i'm a bass player, so i'm not really sure how all that chord stuff works )

The one thing that will really hurt your playing is bordom. If you ever feel bored while practicing anything, then you are doing the wrong thing. Change up your practicing technique. Also, challenge yourself. Sign up to play shows when your not really ready, try out for different music groups, and always keep yourself open to new genres of music. This will help you stay on your feet.

If you keep playing the same music by the same band, you will never progress as a musician. Try different genres, get to know guitarists in other bands, and get to know how each instrument relates to the other. Like, how the bass and drums need to be intertwined to make a good rythm section. And how the guitar and vocals hold the melody in the song. By learning different genres, you will get better and become more experienced.

I hope this helps somewhat. Just remember not to get bored.

EDIT: oh, and if you can afford or find lessons to get, you really should. It really really open you up as a player. You will be helped by player with experience, who has been in the same spot as you. They will help you out and keep you moving and progressing as a musician.


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#9
Quite simply, stop relying on others. Other bands, other musicians, and those here at UG. If you want to write your own material and make your own music: YOU have to do it. Everyones writing processes are different. Find yours. Writing good music isn't something that can be taught; it's something you have to find within yourself. The only way to find it is by playing.
#11
^I think you totally missed the whole point of this thread.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#12
Learn some songs, they will keep you playing. If your doing steve vai stuff then your fine.
As far as writing, Fool around till you get something good and go from there.
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#13
Well if you can play all these guys songs then you must have fairly decent chops. Just look at solos from songs you know, try to see what they were doing when they made it. Pick out any cool licks you might, develop these licks and change them a little, come up with your own variations and try making your own. Start using these licks in some of your own solos. Learn a couple of scales and try making your own melodies within these scales, if you find there is a not outside of the scale which sounds good then use it. Even though scales are very important don't be restricted by them, just use them as a guideline. And whenever you think of anything like a little riff or lick, it doesn't matter how long it is or if you even think it sounds good, write it down. Alot of the time you will write something which you may not even think sounds very good but you'll come across it at a later date or someone else will hear it and release how good it is. One example of this is Sweet Child of Mine by Guns N' Roses. When Slash first wrote the riff for this he hated it but when Axl heard it he convinced him to use it in a song and look at it know, its one of the most popular riffs of all time.

There are just a couple of pointers that have helped me and may help you.
#14
Quote by ferretman
Well if you can play all these guys songs then you must have fairly decent chops. Just look at solos from songs you know, try to see what they were doing when they made it. Pick out any cool licks you might, develop these licks and change them a little, come up with your own variations and try making your own. Start using these licks in some of your own solos. Learn a couple of scales and try making your own melodies within these scales, if you find there is a not outside of the scale which sounds good then use it. Even though scales are very important don't be restricted by them, just use them as a guideline. And whenever you think of anything like a little riff or lick, it doesn't matter how long it is or if you even think it sounds good, write it down. Alot of the time you will write something which you may not even think sounds very good but you'll come across it at a later date or someone else will hear it and release how good it is. One example of this is Sweet Child of Mine by Guns N' Roses. When Slash first wrote the riff for this he hated it but when Axl heard it he convinced him to use it in a song and look at it know, its one of the most popular riffs of all time.

There are just a couple of pointers that have helped me and may help you.


Thats pretty much what i was gonna say. Good advice

If you know anyone else who plays guitar, who you can jam with, that'll really help. Ive started a jam session before with a 3 powerchord riff and came out of it with a completely different riff that became a well structured song. Sometimes the ideas just flow better when jamming.