#3
Yeah, that helped out a bit, everything seems to be okay, now.

I was wondering, how do I use a heatsink so I don't fry my resistors?
#4
you clip the metal clip (heat sink) to the resistor's metal lead on the side of the board that you arent soldering on. You solder that lead into place. You turn it over and put it on the other side. You solder that side. I would use it on all of the things (capacitors, resistors, especial transistors and special things like that).
#7
It's pretty hard to fry a resistor while soldering, among all electronic components, they tend to be more resistant to heat than others, in my experience.

You'd have to apply your soldering iron for more than 5-7 sec (for let's say... a 40w iron) to even start to do damage in most cases. Soldering should take 3 seconds max.
#8
flux will make the parts stick. I don't know what that does to electrical components however
'01 Sunburst Strat>1953 Valco Supro

'06 Jazz bass>'78 Bassman 10

Simple rig fan.
#9
it doesnt do anything to the components, it just burns of bad materials on the leads, allowing a clean and smooth connection. you cant use too much though or it will fly everywhere and stuff. check the recent flux thread so you can see how to use it.
#10
radioshack has rosin core solder if you're too lazy to use both flux and solder separately.
#13
Quote by call1800ksmyazz
it doesnt do anything to the components, it just burns of bad materials on the leads, allowing a clean and smooth connection. you cant use too much though or it will fly everywhere and stuff. check the recent flux thread so you can see how to use it.



I know all about that

I burned the hell out of my arm with flux. well... it wasn't that bad. It was still pretty bad though.
'01 Sunburst Strat>1953 Valco Supro

'06 Jazz bass>'78 Bassman 10

Simple rig fan.