#1
i am a beginning guitarist and i am wondering why are all the string 2.5 steps apart except for the 2nd and 3rd? is there any musical logic behind that or would it be better to tune EADGAflatEflat
#2
Right I have no ****ing idea what youre trying to say, i'm slef-taught and know that standard is EADGBE why does it matter why it is what it is just enjoy it lol. Plus I play in Drop D most the time anyway.
"The tragic partake of this torment, convincing myself again. This god that I worship, this demon I blame, conspire as one exactly the same it's exactly the same." Lamb of God
#3
You know? that's an excellent question, I've never actually thought about it...*wonders*
#4
well if you think about it standard tuning is wrong and to avoid this you should prolly tune your 6 string guitar to open E major (EBEG#BE)
Cmstar90: i have too lisen to a song for hours just to figure out of one part it sound and how to move my fingers tso that it sounds that way
Cmstar90: when u seem to figure it out in seconds
#5
Quote by oscar7557
well if you think about it standard tuning is wrong and to avoid this you should prolly tune your 6 string guitar to open E major (EBEG#BE)
What the hell? No. That could do some very bad things to the neck.
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
What the hell? No. That could do some very bad things to the neck.



true depending on the guitar but that would be the correct way to tune if you know your theory
Cmstar90: i have too lisen to a song for hours just to figure out of one part it sound and how to move my fingers tso that it sounds that way
Cmstar90: when u seem to figure it out in seconds
#7
hey i found the answer myself now if someone could tell me what it means

The separation of the first (e') and second (b) string, as well as the separation between the third (g), fourth (d), fifth (A), and sixth (E) strings by a 5-semitone interval (a perfect fourth) allows notes of the chromatic scale to be played with each of the four fingers of the left hand controlling one of the first four frets (index finger on fret 1, little finger on fret 4, etc.). It also yields a symmetry and intelligibility to fingering patterns.

The separation of the second (b), and third (g) string is by a 4-semitone interval (a major third). Though this breaks the fingering pattern of the chromatic scale and thus the symmetry, it eases the playing of some often-used chords and scale, and it provides more diversity in fingering possibilities.

When the guitar is strummed with all strings open (as sometimes happens momentarily during difficult chord changes in frenetic passages of modern songs) it plays a tolerable A11 chord
#8
Quote by oscar7557
but that would be the correct way to tune if you know your theory
WTF?

Quote by jhjps
hey i found the answer myself now if someone could tell me what it means

The separation of the first (e') and second (b) string, as well as the separation between the third (g), fourth (d), fifth (A), and sixth (E) strings by a 5-semitone interval (a perfect fourth) allows notes of the chromatic scale to be played with each of the four fingers of the left hand controlling one of the first four frets (index finger on fret 1, little finger on fret 4, etc.). It also yields a symmetry and intelligibility to fingering patterns.

The separation of the second (b), and third (g) string is by a 4-semitone interval (a major third). Though this breaks the fingering pattern of the chromatic scale and thus the symmetry, it eases the playing of some often-used chords and scale, and it provides more diversity in fingering possibilities.

When the guitar is strummed with all strings open (as sometimes happens momentarily during difficult chord changes in frenetic passages of modern songs) it plays a tolerable A11 chord
To paraphrase, it means that we tune the guitar the way we do because it makes common things easy to play.

One thing I want to change is this: the open strings form Em11, not A11.
#9
well if you want to get technical they also can be called G6add9,Em7add11,A7sus4add9,Bm7add11/5+
Cmstar90: i have too lisen to a song for hours just to figure out of one part it sound and how to move my fingers tso that it sounds that way
Cmstar90: when u seem to figure it out in seconds
#10
Quote by oscar7557
well if you think about it standard tuning is wrong and to avoid this you should prolly tune your 6 string guitar to open E major (EBEG#BE)


That is probably the most retarded thing I've ever seen. There is a reason why it is called STANDARD tuning. Mainly, it makes a lot of common techniques easiest in that tuning.
#11
Quote by oscar7557
well if you want to get technical they also can be called G6add9,Em7add11,A7sus4add9,Bm7add11/5+

if you wanna get technical, your chord naming sucks.

if you have a seventh you wouldnt ever say add11, so that gets rid of two of your names. if you have 7sus4 you just say sus, getting rid of another. which leaves you with one correctly named chord, congratulations

care to explain why it would be theoretically correct to tune to an open E chord? cause i have a feeling that it wont be a better idea than tuning in perfect fourths.
#12
Quote by jof1029
if you wanna get technical, your chord naming sucks.

if you have a seventh you wouldnt ever say add11, so that gets rid of two of your names. if you have 7sus4 you just say sus, getting rid of another. which leaves you with one correctly named chord, congratulations

care to explain why it would be theoretically correct to tune to an open E chord? cause i have a feeling that it wont be a better idea than tuning in perfect fourths.
He also had a slash chord with an alteration in the bass.


Also, wouldn't you write G6add9 as G6/9 or something like that (we should probably go with G9/6 if that is the case...for obvious reasons).
#13
^G9 implies a dominant seventh in the chord, G6/9 or G6(9) would be appropriate for a chord spelled like this 1 3 5 6 9. Yeah, standard tuning is pretty effective for guitar purposes. Here's something interesting-- Violin is tuned to perfect fifths, and because of the string spacing, you can play an ascending major scale, playing four notes per string (one for each finger) for almost 2 1/2 octaves without changing hand position. The perfect tuning for single note lines, but double stops in thirds (some of the most common double stops) require a bigger stretch than on guitar. Guitar is actually very cleverly designed for ease of chording
#14
They're tuned in 5ths, apart from the 1st and 2nd strings, which are tuned in 4ths. Its to allow most chord shapes to be easily played on guitar, such as open chords and your standard barre chords.
#15
yeah dude, tune you're guitar that whacked out open E major way, then do me a favor.... play an open E minor.....
#16
Quote by madmk
They're tuned in 5ths, apart from the 1st and 2nd strings, which are tuned in 4ths.
No. They're tuned in 4ths, apart from the 1st and 2nd strings, which are tuned in major 3rds.