#1
Do any of you have a certain way of memorizing the modes... I'm having alot of trouble memorizing which ones are which.
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#2
Hmm...are you talking about remembering the names of the modes, the scale degrees, or tha finger patterns on the neck?
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#3
i'm talking about which names go with which finger patterns
Quote by Heid
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#4
hmm...not too sure here but i might as well try. the way i approached this is to first try, as best as i could, to memorize the finger patterns that go along with the mode names. then i wrote down each of the modes of the scale (eg. major: ionian,dorian,phrygian, lydian,myxolydian,aeolian, and locrian) on seperate pieces of paper. then i would mix them up, pick one out, and try playing it. this helped because it wasnt some repetition excersise where i simply played a mode and then said the name (those repetitive excersises are tedious, boring, and make me loose concentration quickly), but instead was an interactive and creative method to learning. hope that helped , if not , try creating your own "game" of some sort. you'll learn faster if you enjoy the learning proccess.
p.s. have a reference of some sort that shows you the modes and such so you dont struggle too much with this.
-peace
"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will be at peace" -Hendrix
Why are you afraid? What can the world do to you? People can laugh at you, it will do them good-laughter is always a medicine, healthful.
#6
If you memorize all the positions of the major scale you have basically memorized all the modes too. The only difference is the root note is different. So say you wanted to learn Mixolydian. (Im assuming you know where modes come from) Play an E7 chord a couple times (preferably in the same position as the scale position your in or want to practice) and play an A major scale but instead of finishing on A finish on E. Try and memorize where the E notes (the root notes) are. Once you have an idea where those E notes are you basically know where the root notes of mixolydian are in that particular shape. Then you can just transfer it other keys. Try to make some music out of them or some licks instead of just running through them.
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#7
just think of what degree on the scale the mode is derived from. i think in solfedge here.
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#8
Slightly different to what you're talking about, but I thought I'd share my wonderful mnemonic for remembering the order of the modes here. If you use it you owe me royalties.

I ----------------Ionian
Don't-----------Dorian
Play-------------Phrygian
Lyke------------Lydian
Malmsteen----Myxolydian
And------------Aeolian
Laiho ----------Locrian

Note the cunning spelling mistake to prevent me getting Lydian and Locrian's placings confused.

...okay, I'll leave now.
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#9
I know this isnt my thread but to save making a new one could you tell me what the formula for working out all the modes is please.
#10
Quote by Sadam
I know this isnt my thread but to save making a new one could you tell me what the formula for working out all the modes is please.
Happy to help...
Ionian: W W H W W W H
Dorian: W H W W W H W
Phyrgian: H W W W H W W
Lydian: W W W H W W H
Mixolydian: W W H W W H W
Aeolian: W H W W H W W
Locrian: H W W H W W W
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
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#11
Well it just goes for memorizing everything else, like physics equations and chemistry concepts.

This is the method that I use, I visualize CDEFGAB (with C as starting note) and I visualize the name of the mode beside it, well it works for everything else for me and I am synaesthetic so..
#12
uh i know i should probbaly make a new thread but, could someone explain to me in a nutshell what modes are? are they just things to remember scales like WWHWWWH-major scale.? and if so, how many are there?
:stickpoke

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#14
Quote by moo453
uh i know i should probbaly make a new thread but, could someone explain to me in a nutshell what modes are? are they just things to remember scales like WWHWWWH-major scale.? and if so, how many are there?
In a nutshell, and according to The Harvard Dictionary of Music, modes are derived from the ancient Church Modes which are defined as a medieval system of eight scales, each consisting of the tones of the C major scale but starting and closing on d, e, f, or g and limited to the range of about an octave. For each of these four tones, called a finalis, there exist two modes distinguished by the different position of the octave range.

This definition doesn't do us guitarists much good, however, so let's fast-forward about a thousand years...

Using T.H.D.M.'s definition again, a mode denotes the selection of tones, arranged in a scale, that form the basic tonal substance of a composition.

Hmmm. Well, this isn't much help either, at least as it relates to your question.

For our purposes here, then, let's just call a mode a one-octave sequence of scale tones, played one after another in order, starting and stopping on each different tone of that scale.

Using a C major scale (C D E F G A B C) as an example...
* starting and stopping on the first tone, C, produces the Ionian mode: C D E F G A B C.
* starting and stopping on the second tone, D, produces the Dorian mode: D E F G A B C D

Continuing in like manner...
* starting and stopping on the third tone, E, produces the Phrygian mode
* starting and stopping on the fourth tone, F, produces the Lydian mode
* starting and stopping on the fifth tone, G, produces the Mixolydian mode
* starting and stopping on the sixth tone, A, produces the Aeolian mode
* starting and stopping on the seventh tone, B, produces the Locrian mode

...and that brings us back to our starting point, C.

Regarding whether modes are simply one more thing to remember, I suggest you and a musical friend get together for a mode-exploration session. The program for this session would go something like this:

* One of you plays the I chord in any key of your choice. Let's say you two have chosen C major. Since the I chord in C major is C major, one of you will play a C major chord. The other player will play the Ionian mode (the C major scale) over this C major chord. No noodling or improvisation allowed at this point, simply play the mode over the chord, up and down, one octave or two, just play the mode over the chord. Now swap - the one who started with the chord now plays the mode, and the one who started with the mode now plays the chord. You can make this a little more interesting with a drum machine, but that's just a nice extra if one is available.

* When you're ready, move on to the ii chord, D minor in this case. Now player #1 plays a D minor chord while player #2 plays the Dorian mode (D E F G A B C D). Again, no noodling or licks allowed, just play the mode over the chord. Then swap, so that player #1 plays the Dorian mode over player #1's D minor chord.

* Play through the rest of the diatonic chord / modes in this manner.

Here's a special instruction for the vii0 / Locrian mode set...Since the vii0 chord often serves as the V7 chord without a root, play the Locrian mode over both the vii0 and V chords.

When you and player #2 are comfortable with playing these chord / mode combinations in order, start playing them in progressions. For example, try I-IV-V, I-vi-IV-V, ii-V-I, etc., etc., etc. The possibilities are literally endless.

I promise that this process will lead you very quickly to a deeper respect for modes and a new sense of their musical possibilities. Quite frankly, you'll simply hear them in a whole new way. I've done this more times than I could possibly count with my students over the years and, without fail, they've gotten quite excited when that mode light goes on in their minds.

I hope this helped. -gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#15
id tell you how i memorize things, but its confusing. its easy for me to remember but then when i tell someone, they lose me lol.