#1
Two parts to this thread, guys

Firstly, Ive been playing about a year or two, and my basic skills and fundamentals are pretty sound. I can play stuff like Under The Bridge with a little effort. What Id like to focus on now is building speed and accuracy, and gaining a better understanding of musical theory. In other words, the hallmarks of a skilled musician. I recently began taking lessons, so thats helping with the theory part, but Id like to do something on my own to supplement that I guess. So my questions are these: Where should I go to help with gaining a deeper understanding of theory? Books? If so, which ones? Online lessons?
And what can I do to build speed? Hand exercises, drills, anything and everything possible. How long should it take to be able to start rolling off decently fast licks? The kind of stuff that makes your friends go "whoa, damn" is what I'm after

Thanks
#2
umm, generally speaking its usually 2 er 2 1/2 years before you kinda have that aha! gestalt moment and things all fall into place a bit. some sooner some later w/e. just start messing around with some scales, and come up with a few licks that you think sound good then practice them untill you can play em fast
#3
You might get a jump start in your theory by looking at the caged system. You'll see triads, inversions, chords, pents, modes, and scales and how they're all linked together. Good way to know your fretboard.

For example, start by finding octaves. Play an open bass E and find all the Es.
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+
#4
Quote by OldRocker
You might get a jump start in your theory by looking at the caged system. You'll see triads, inversions, chords, pents, modes, and scales and how they're all linked together. Good way to know your fretboard.

For example, start by finding octaves. Play an open bass E and find all the Es.


That's exactly the kind of thing I'm looking for, where could I find this?

PS Sorry for the nubby questions guys, I really appreciate it
#5
#6
Do a google search for "caged system". There's tons of sites that'll tell you all about it.

C A G E D stands for the open chord shapes. As you move the shapes up the neck it'll become closed chords known as barre chords. If you learn the 5 chord shapes you're practically halfway there to understanding your fretboard.

The "E" shaped and the "A" shaped barre chords are very popular and widely used but you should add the "C" shaped chords to your collections. I have trouble making a barred "G" and "D" shaped chords myself so I either leave out the low E string or the high E string on the chords.
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+
#8