#1
If anyone here is familiar with this piece, please read:


Im am trying to learn the Frog Galliard piece by john dowling and in my sheet music, it says to tune my g-string down to F#. Does this sound right to you guys? WHen i play it in standard, it doesnt sound right and i am playing it just like the video i have of scott tennent.

If you have any tips id appreciate it, im having trouble with the chord changes at the beggining. I know practice is the best way to get better, and i do consider myself an intermediate player. I also know that using my a finger in some of the faster parts will make it easier, but i tought myself so just know i am realizing it.

Thanks.
#2
John Dowland, not Dowling.

And leave it in standard tuning, don't change the G to an F#, I'm not entirely sure why it says that, as I've come across it as well. If anything, put a capo on the 2nd fret to emulate lute tuning.
My God, it's full of stars!
#3
Dowland, im sorry. Im at work right now. In my book it does say to capo the second fret as well, but i hate using capos. Is there any chance you know where there is a recorded solo guitar piece that i can find? The only one i have is a crappy recording of "pumping nylon" i have with tennant. I would ideally like to listen to it in my car, but could not locate the cd. I might have to by the lute recording.

Thanks.
#5
Thats the exact video i have. I just searched amazon and couldnt find anything- thanks for your help though.
#6
to be 'historically correct' when performing lute and vihuela pieces a lot of transcriptions will ask you to tune the G to an F# to mimick the pitch spacing between strings of a 6 course lute of vihuela.
wake the sun so the stars cant shine....
#7
Could someone please direct me to a tab of that?

Originally Posted by guitar_freak333
I dont like death metal, I just see it as a bunch of hairy men playing the same riff over and over again exetremely fast.
#8
Sorry can't help you with it. But I just wanted to say that not everything played on a classical guitar is classical music. John Dowland is a renaissance composer. In the case of classical guitar, music from the classical, romantic, baroque and renaissance (esp. lute transcriptions) eras are played often.
#9
Quote by Shoestick
Could someone please direct me to a tab of that?




I wish i could, i got it out of a classical sheet music book that also had tab. I will post the name of the book when i get home- it was like 10.00 (us)
#10
Im bumping this instead of creating a new thread.

I have been working on this song for a while now, and am having some trouble getting the legato part up to speed. Im an intermediate- advanced player, and i know that if you slow it down then you will get it eventually. I have been practicing it for a while now, AND CANT GET IT TO SOUND AS SMOOTh on a nylon string. My legato on electric is solid, but its not the same on classical. ANyone who can play this song, i would love some help.
Thanks.
Not Enough AssHatery