#1
Im thinkin of gettin a frettles and i was wonderin if they are that much diffrent than fretted basses oh well thanks for posting
#2
Their a lot different my friend. The bass relies on your accuracy to make the notes. Id suggest since this is your 1st time with a fretless get a lined or doted fretless. Other than that have fun! Slides sound UBER sexy on a fretless.
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#3
Quit saying "frettles". Its "fretless".
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#4
do fretless basses totally get rid of the clicking noise(i dont get a clicking noise unless i play to hard, which i stopped doing), and can u slap on a fretless
#5
Quote by metalstillsucks
Quit saying "frettles". Its "fretless".


Quit being so rude. This isn't "The Pit".
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#6
Its for his own good.

And that thing gives me a headache.

And fretless is a good idea.
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#7
Quote by Jonny182
do fretless basses totally get rid of the clicking noise(i dont get a clicking noise unless i play to hard, which i stopped doing), and can u slap on a fretless


Yes, no more buzzing

Most people would say no, you cant really slap on a fretless. Not only do the majority of bassists agree that it doesnt sound good, it can also potentially damage youre fretboard (moreso if the finish on the fretboard was done poorly)
#8
As Jaco Pastious said it, "it's all in the hands."

Since the fingers are responsible for the sounding of each note played on a fretless, it matters how you approach it. The bass itself will have "mwah" factor--that characteristic blooming of warmth similar to an Indian sitar or a sarod, but much more subtle. The harder (and smoother) the fingerboard, the more "mwah" you get. If you use a tough pinch, it can squelch the "mwah", but if you fid the right touch, you can get it to bloom nicely, especially if you pluck somewhere around the 12th fret with the right hand.

The other thing is--since it is fretless, your fingers are solely responsible to making the notes sing. Not just playing the right note--making the note come to life by adding a little side-to-side vibrato. If you are really good, you wait a moment before starting the vibrato, to emulate the human voice. If you start the vibrato too soon, or if you do it too fast, it can sound erratic. Make it sing like a human voice.

Also, you can pluck an open harmonic (e.g., at 3rd, 4th, 5th or 7th fret--place the finger on the string but do not hold it down to the fingerboard--just let it sit there while you pluck with the right hand--you get a high harmonic related to the open string), but unlike a fretted bass, you can sound it, then press down on the fingerboard and slide the harmonic upwards or downwards! Carles Benavent uses this technique for flamenco bass embellishments--and he builds chords using harmonics like Jaco used to do.

Fretless is so much fun. The tone is infectious. You'll want to play it for everything, but alas, it does not work for everything. Metal hasn't caught on to fretless bass that much...

Plus, you can attempt to play quarter tones (e.g., a note between D and D#), like in Persian music, or harmonic modes like in some African music--playing notes not present in the Western equal tempered scale. Heck, you'll be able to play the "blue note" a lot easier on the fretless than on the fretted bass!

After playing a fretless for a while, playing a fretted bass will be like going from three dimensions to two dimensions. Those who've been there understand what I mean. Fretted bass will still be fun, but you will go back to the "mwah" factor of the fretless just to get your fix!
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#9
Quote by jaco de lucia
As Jaco Pastious said it, "it's all in the hands."

Since the fingers are responsible for the sounding of each note played on a fretless, it matters how you approach it. The bass itself will have "mwah" factor--that characteristic blooming of warmth similar to an Indian sitar or a sarod, but much more subtle. The harder (and smoother) the fingerboard, the more "mwah" you get. If you use a tough pinch, it can squelch the "mwah", but if you fid the right touch, you can get it to bloom nicely, especially if you pluck somewhere around the 12th fret with the right hand.

The other thing is--since it is fretless, your fingers are solely responsible to making the notes sing. Not just playing the right note--making the note come to life by adding a little side-to-side vibrato. If you are really good, you wait a moment before starting the vibrato, to emulate the human voice. If you start the vibrato too soon, or if you do it too fast, it can sound erratic. Make it sing like a human voice.

Also, you can pluck an open harmonic (e.g., at 3rd, 4th, 5th or 7th fret--place the finger on the string but do not hold it down to the fingerboard--just let it sit there while you pluck with the right hand--you get a high harmonic related to the open string), but unlike a fretted bass, you can sound it, then press down on the fingerboard and slide the harmonic upwards or downwards! Carles Benavent uses this technique for flamenco bass embellishments--and he builds chords using harmonics like Jaco used to do.

Fretless is so much fun. The tone is infectious. You'll want to play it for everything, but alas, it does not work for everything. Metal hasn't caught on to fretless bass that much...

Plus, you can attempt to play quarter tones (e.g., a note between D and D#), like in Persian music, or harmonic modes like in some African music--playing notes not present in the Western equal tempered scale. Heck, you'll be able to play the "blue note" a lot easier on the fretless than on the fretted bass!

After playing a fretless for a while, playing a fretted bass will be like going from three dimensions to two dimensions. Those who've been there understand what I mean. Fretted bass will still be fun, but you will go back to the "mwah" factor of the fretless just to get your fix!


metal NEEDs to catch out... i've only seen a handful of fretless metal playesr
#10
Steve gigorgio's managed it though
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#11
Quote by StygianFury666
metal NEEDs to catch out... i've only seen a handful of fretless metal playesr


I'm actually using my fretless in a punk/metal band I just joined as a fill-in. Everyone in the band loves the way it sounds.

I love my fretless, but on stage it's almost impossible for me to play due to how much I move around. That's why I have my fretted, it is much easier to play when your doing something else. heh.
#13
what's the blue note?
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