#1
So after 5 years of playing guitar, I'm taking the effort to learn theory. I know very basic theory, such as note names and major key signatures, outside of that, I don't know much. I'm starting myself at scales and I'm having a bit of trouble understanding them. The scale "shapes" confuse me and I can't see how riffs are written using shapes. Could someone PLEASE help me understand scales and show me an example of how riffs are derived from scales?
2005 Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Marshall JCM900 MKIII Master Volume head
Carvin G412T cabinet
Line 6 DL-4
Boss BF-3
Boss CS-3
Boss NS-2
Boss OD-20
Boss PH-2
Ibanez TS-7 (being modded soon!)
#2
a scale is a group of notes through an octave that gets a specific sound for example the major scale sounds happy and the minor scale sounds sad

usually artists will play around with scale while writing a piece of music to here how a riff is derived find out what scale an artist is using and where the root note of the scale is and compare the notes of the scale to the riff usually the notes of the riff will fit in the scale
#3
Quote by Ambulance X
So after 5 years of playing guitar, I'm taking the effort to learn theory. I know very basic theory, such as note names and major key signatures, outside of that, I don't know much. I'm starting myself at scales and I'm having a bit of trouble understanding them. The scale "shapes" confuse me and I can't see how riffs are written using shapes. Could someone PLEASE help me understand scales and show me an example of how riffs are derived from scales?
Trying to learn scales by using shapes could cause big problems, I would think. You'd be much better off, in my opinion, first learning how scales are put together and applying that knowledge to your fingerboard. The shapes would then emerge from applying your understanding to your instrument instead of you trying to extract understanding from the seemingly arbitrary shapes you're using.

I've put together a couple of lessons on scales...

Basic Scales

The Major Scale

I hope you find them helpful.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#4
dude a scale is a group of notes. if i would play an e minor pentatonic on the 12th fret, its just the same as playing in the open position, or "zero" in tab. you could switch back and forth to get some range in your solos, and the notes in the scale lie on other places of the fingerboard too, so just knowing the notes of a scale is important. its okay to learn box patterns, but i find it too limiting.