#1
Does anyone know if it's possible to change the ohms of a Fender Super Reverb? It has a 2ohm rating. I was considering modifing mine with a 15" speaker instead of the 4-10's
#2
Im not real sure about amp electronics, but why would you want to go down to 1 speaker instead of having 4. I would think it would be better to have 40 total inches of speakers instead of 1 15 speaker. But then again I dont really know.
#3
Hi If u could tell me how the original speakers r wired i.e. series or parrallel or series/parrallel. This is how u work out how many ohms the amplifier is driving into. In turn this give u the amount of wattage can b burnt by the speakers.

But as a general rule most amplifiers (2day) will drive a 2ohm load with no problems. I would say if u r currently using 4 speakers (in a cab sort of setup) not external. They will b series parrallel which is the = 4ohm load.

If your new 15" is rated at 8ohm or 4ohms there will b no problem the amp is rated 2 handle it.

U would only have a problem if u go to low in ohmage this allows the amp to try & drive harder than what the parts inside will allow, & the smoke will get out.
as this amp is rated 2 drive into a 2ohm load (u said) it is not a problem 2 raise the ohmage ever. Just means the amp is unable 2 work at its ABSOLUTE max (this is usually a good thing as it helps stop distortion)
Richard

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#4
no, your right, cone surface area is important, and, tho 5,000,000 tiny speakers (2cm or somethin) they'll sound tinny as $#!7, they'll be loud with it, but with 10" there's no problem with tinniness, and cone suface area means more volume, a 15" would only be a good option if you were building a bass cab out of parts from it, in which case i'd probably still go for the four 10s due to the wiring options it opens up
#5
Quote by 6SecondFlatline
Does anyone know if it's possible to change the ohms of a Fender Super Reverb? It has a 2ohm rating. I was considering modifing mine with a 15" speaker instead of the 4-10's

The only way to change the output impedance is to buy a pricey output transformer. You'd best off by going with the closest rated speaker. If you wanted a 15" speaker, I'd try and find a 4 ohm speaker (which I don't think I've ever seen in 15") I would avoid going higher than 4ohm.

Also, I'm REALLY tired of pointing this out, but a speaker is NOT a resistive load! There's a reason they call it speaker IMPEDANCE and not speaker RESISTANCE. If you deviate from the rated output, you'll LOSE power, either way. If you deviate TOO much, you'll cause your output transformer some damage (ie, when you have no load connected at all, or your load is TOO high).

Last edited by greenbox at Jul 29, 2006,