#1
I dont understand how a chords are made up. For ex. if you got a g major bar chord i know that the root is g and its where ur index fingers goes, but what i dont know is what the third and fifth mean. in my book here it says major barre chords are made up of the root, 3rd and 5th...what the heck does that mean!?
#2
it's the root, 3rd and 5th of the major scale.

For G it is

G B D

It's not in order in your G barre chord as you've probably noticed.

The notes for that go

3 G
3 D
4 B
5 G
5 D
3 G
#5
Quote by scheck006
it's the root, 3rd and 5th of the major scale.

For G it is

G B D

It's not in order in your G barre chord as you've probably noticed.

The notes for that go

3 G
3 D
4 B
5 G
5 D
3 G


I see, but i have no clue what even a major scale is. what im basically doing is just looking at tablature and looking at the root of the tabbed chord to identify the root of the chord, so i cant tell by lookin at tab if its major, dom, or what. the problem is that it would be hella confusing and hard to memorize all the different fingerings for the chords. so does knowing what 3rd and 5th means going to help you identify the chord on a tablature much more easier or what?

and is there like some easy way to look at tab and say oh pffs thats a gdom7 chord and i put my fingers right here here n here...???
#6
you have to understand the way notes are written and called. You can learn shapes of chords ie. G7 is your 7th chord at 3rd fret G. But it's going to be much more beneficial to know how scales are constructed and why they make sense.
#7
Quote by Unreal T
I see, but i have no clue what even a major scale is. what im basically doing is just looking at tablature and looking at the root of the tabbed chord to identify the root of the chord, so i cant tell by lookin at tab if its major, dom, or what. the problem is that it would be hella confusing and hard to memorize all the different fingerings for the chords. so does knowing what 3rd and 5th means going to help you identify the chord on a tablature much more easier or what?

and is there like some easy way to look at tab and say oh pffs thats a gdom7 chord and i put my fingers right here here n here...???


if you dont know what i major scale is... i highly suggest u have a music whiz friend teach u or SOMETHING
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#8
well the most i can do now is just locate all of the names of the frets on the neck...

does anyone wanna volunteer to teach me from the start about everything...i gotta hotmail account

PLEASE!!!
#9
Quote by Unreal T
I see, but i have no clue what even a major scale is. what im basically doing is just looking at tablature and looking at the root of the tabbed chord to identify the root of the chord, so i cant tell by lookin at tab if its major, dom, or what.
You figure out which notes you're playing and what the intervals are.

Read this.

Quote by Unreal T

the problem is that it would be hella confusing and hard to memorize all the different fingerings for the chords.
There are 4 basic shapes and then you move them around as barre chords. It isn;t as hard as it may seem.

Quote by Unreal T

so does knowing what 3rd and 5th means going to help you identify the chord on a tablature much more easier or what?
If you don't immediately recognize the chord, yes.

Quote by Unreal T

and is there like some easy way to look at tab and say oh pffs thats a gdom7 chord and i put my fingers right here here n here...???
There are several standard barre and open position chords that you should be able to recognize fairly easily. Those are your caged chords and chords of the sort, and your E, Em, A, and Am shape barre chords. If the chord is not one of those chords, you do what I said earlier in this post.
#10
do you mean you know where the notes are? or are you talking about the fret numbers
#11
where they are...

heres how i know and is it right by the way lol? ok well between every natural note its 2 frets or one whole step except e-f and b-c which is a half step or one fret...the highest u can go is a g# and u just use the strings ebgdae acordingly to these rules to get any note!
#12
yea that's right.

Scales are just a pattern of notes.


In the key of C, which means the scale starts on C, you have no sharps or flats.


C D E F G A B C

is a C major scale.

so logically the 1st 3rd and 5th notes are the chord notes.

if you look at your C chord it's got C E G in it
#13
Quote by scheck006
except G has to be on the bottom


no.


if G isn't on bottom, its not a root position chord. Just because the root isn't the bass, doesn't mean its not a G major chord.


They're called third and fifth because thats their number in the major scale.

A g major chord is made up of the first, third, and fifth notes in the G major sclae.
G A B D C E F# G

1 = G
3 = B
5 = D


G B D makes up a G major chord. Regardless of what order you put them in, its a G major chord.
If it goes D G B, it becomes a G/D chord in pop terminology. B D G, G/B chord in pop terminology. Classical terminology Im not going to get into because it'd be way over your head right now.


But I hope that helped. And that you didnt believe the guy who said if G isnt at bottom, its not G major. Because that statement was dumb.
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#14
Yep.

G B D=G major
B D G=First inversion...Still G major.
D G B=Second inversion...Still G major.


But I don't think you should worry about inversions yet.
#15
I don't know why you're being so difficult. If you want a different note on the bottom of the chord, you say so. If not, then you assume the chord is in root position.
#16
Quote by scheck006
yea that's right.

Scales are just a pattern of notes.


In the key of C, which means the scale starts on C, you have no sharps or flats.


C D E F G A B C

is a C major scale.

so logically the 1st 3rd and 5th notes are the chord notes.

if you look at your C chord it's got C E G in it


I see!!!

So basically if you look at tab and look at the lowest string thats the root, lets say the root is D. The scale for that would be DEFGABCD? So how would I recognize what the chord is just by looking at the number in the tab? And how do you tell if its major or minor?
#17
Quote by Unreal T
I see!!!

So basically if you look at tab and look at the lowest string thats the root, lets say the root is D. The scale for that would be DEFGABCD? So how would I recognize what the chord is just by looking at the number in the tab? And how do you tell if its major or minor?
Read that lesson I posted. It should answer every question in that post.
#18
not quite, because there are different kinds of spaces between the letters, as in E and F have no note between them, there needs to be flats or sharps added to the scales to keep the pattern the same.

lets look back at the C scale and we'll find the intervals between each note.


C D E F G A B C

whole step, whole step, half step, whole whole whole half


let's abbriviate that for sake of remembering the pattern.

1W
2W
3H
4W
5W
6W
7H

If you do that starting on D, then you need to change a few notes.


1D to E

whole, good nothing to change there.

2E to F

Half step. we need our 2nd interval to be a whole step. let's rase the F to an F #

2nd interval revised = E to F#

3 F# to G

half step - good

4 G to A

whole - good

5 A to B

whole, correct

6 B to C

we need another whole step here, so as we did to the F, we'll make a C# now.

6th revised = B to C#

7 C# to D

half step, good. That's the last interval. So now we need to realize that the D major scale has a F# and a C#

that's how all the other scales are derived. You take the starting note, and play the pattern WWHWWWH starting from that note.
#19
nope because i dont know any positions or anything...

all i know now is how to locate any note on the neck like F and say F scale is FGABCDEF and i dunno how to tell if its major minor or how to read it on tab and say its whatever its really called.

would it be the root is f and the 3rd is A and 5th is C so its FAC...dunno how to tell FAC on tab or recognize!?
#20
lol, you got your F scale wrong but you have the right idea.

F major has one flat, Bb.
FGABbCDEF.

However, you have the right idea. And since the flat isn't the third or fifth in F major,
If you see F, A, C, and no other notes, you most definately have an F major chord.


the only scales that stick to notes without accidentals are C major & its modes.
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#21
Quote by UtBDan
lol, you got your F scale wrong but you have the right idea.

F major has one flat, Bb.
FGABbCDEF.

However, you have the right idea. And since the flat isn't the third or fifth in F major,
If you see F, A, C, and no other notes, you most definately have an F major chord.


the only scales that stick to notes without accidentals are C major & its modes.


lol omg im about to give up on this stuff. what makes an F scale have b flat and a C scale just go CDEFGABC?!!!!
#23
Quote by scheck006
not quite, because there are different kinds of spaces between the letters, as in E and F have no note between them, there needs to be flats or sharps added to the scales to keep the pattern the same.

lets look back at the C scale and we'll find the intervals between each note.


C D E F G A B C

whole step, whole step, half step, whole whole whole half


let's abbriviate that for sake of remembering the pattern.

1W
2W
3H
4W
5W
6W
7H

If you do that starting on D, then you need to change a few notes.


1D to E

whole, good nothing to change there.

2E to F

Half step. we need our 2nd interval to be a whole step. let's rase the F to an F #

2nd interval revised = E to F#

3 F# to G

half step - good

4 G to A

whole - good

5 A to B

whole, correct

6 B to C

we need another whole step here, so as we did to the F, we'll make a C# now.

6th revised = B to C#

7 C# to D

half step, good. That's the last interval. So now we need to realize that the D major scale has a F# and a C#

that's how all the other scales are derived. You take the starting note, and play the pattern WWHWWWH starting from that note.



lol! I think i got it !! yeahhH!! lol
#25
The major scale is a pattern of notes. The second is a whole step away from the root. (In C, this means D is 2 frets/2 tones/2 halfsteps away from C). The third is a whole step away from the 2nd (E is 2 frets/2 tones/2 halfsteps away from D). The fourth is a halfstep up from the third, the fifth is a whole step above the fourth, the sixth is a whole step above the fifth, the seventh is a whole step above the sixth, and the octave is a halfstep above the seventh.


Knowing this, that is why people will tell you the major scale is
WWHWWWH.

if you apply this, you know D is a whole step above C and thus the 2nd in the major scale and so forth and so forth until you know that C major is
CDEFGABC

if you apply this to F, you will know it is
FGABbCDEF

there are ways of knowing which keys have what flats and what sharps and where, like the circle of fifths, but if you want to know WHY they have what they do... I just told you in as clear terms as I could say.
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#26
Quote by scheck006
so then take apart the F scale and tell me why it has a Bb.


ok F scale

heres how i would do it: i first would say the pattern WWHWWWH then say FGABCDEF and then check it out

F-G =1W
G-A=1W
A-B=1 w should be 1Half so you make the B one step lower to B flat
Bflat
so far its FGABflat
Bflat-C=? :-( erm...
#27
there isn't a note in between B and C right? so if you play every note from Bb to C you get


Bb - B - C that's a whole step. you're doing good. keep going.
#28
Quote by scheck006
there isn't a note in between B and C right? so if you play every note from Bb to C you get


Bb - B - C that's a whole step. you're doing good. keep going.


C-D 1W
D-E 1W
E-F 1Half

Ok so:
the WWHWWWH is a major scale format. So if you take any note you gotta have it follow this pattern and change anything if it doesnt follow.

A C# Major chord will go like CDEFGABC

An A major chord will go like

A B C# D E F# G# A???
#29
A C# major scale will be C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#

I'd much rather think of that as Db though

Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db


When you have 2 names for the same note, such as C# and Db, they are called enharmonics.


A major is 3 sharps, correct.
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#30
pffs lol ...i started at C when it was a C# scale...

so do you have do always do this when coming up with scales?
Im guessing the format for minor is different but used in the same way?
#31
You don't always have to do that when coming up with scales. In fact, you'll start to hear the major scale in your head and know the finger pattern for it. After a while you'll start to memorize what keys have what flats and sharps. You can also figure that out by the circle of 5ths.

If you start the major scale on the 6th note, then you have the minor scale.

so A B C D E F G A

is A minor. did you see how we went to the 6th note of the C major scale?
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#32
this is always the pattern of the major scale.


The natural minor scale is WHWWHWW.

Most people do this when coming up with scales. For modes, you can memorize one pattern and just know to start from somewhere else... but the idea is, yes, if you want to just know the notes of a scale, you also have to know the pattern of the scale... which is why most teachers will drive WWHWWWH on you over and over until you get it rather than focus on memorizing notes of the fretboard or anything like that.
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#33
Quote by scheck006
You don't always have to do that when coming up with scales. In fact, you'll start to hear the major scale in your head and know the finger pattern for it. After a while you'll start to memorize what keys have what flats and sharps. You can also figure that out by the circle of 5ths.

If you start the major scale on the 6th note, then you have the minor scale.

so A B C D E F G A

is A minor. did you see how we went to the 6th note of the C major scale?


I dont know what you mean by starting the major scale on the 6th note. When you say ABCDEFGA is A minor then you say you went to the 6th note of the C major scale confuses me...


The natural minor scale is WHWWHWW is what UtBDan said so should i just use that the same way as deriving major scales?
#34
that works, but dude, if you look at the pattern of the major scale...


look at the 6th note of C major. Its A. Start the C major scale from A, and you have A natural minor. That was what we were trying to explain. Its the same pattern from a different starting point. You can memorize it whichever way works best for you.
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#35
ok so basically you just take any major sale, take the 6th note and thats where the minor scale starts for that note which would be A on a CMaj scale?

Ok so if you got a C major scale for instance, what C do you start at out of all of the C's on the guitar?! And how do you know where else to play, is it all on the same string or what?
#36
you can pick which C to play. There are at least 7 or 8 ways to play each scale.
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#37
I was lookin at this... http://www.activeguitar.com/lessons/guitar/53-1.asp and I see now pretty much you just play scales by going to the closest note. But in this diagram in bar 3 why are they starting at B for when it is a C major scale? At bar 2 it ends and now they go to Bar 3 with starting with B!?
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,
#38
^The diagram shows the scale played ascending, and then descending. So, perhaps like this...

C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C - B - A - G - F - E - D - C.
#39
Quote by Unreal T
ok so basically you just take any major sale, take the 6th note and thats where the minor scale starts for that note which would be A on a CMaj scale?

Ok so if you got a C major scale for instance, what C do you start at out of all of the C's on the guitar?! And how do you know where else to play, is it all on the same string or what?



1, you get the natural minor scale. There isn't a such thing as "the minor scale". There is one major scale. There are 3 minor scales: natural minor, harmonic minor, and melodic minor.


2, it doesn't matter where you start... if its a C major scale, and it starts on C, its a C major scale. You know where else to play by learning the fretboard and learning the scale. That's why people practice instead of just reading a page and being look whoop! I know all there is to guitar. There is no secret to it. Its practice.
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