#1
Alright, ive been studying theory a bunch lately, and particularly because I will be a guitarist in jazz band for my school this year. This is a simple question really, but has been bugging me. When creating a song, do you start with the chord progression, and then write the lead according to what scale youre supposed to use for each individual chord? Like, are you only "allowed" to use chords that lie within the same scale initially? Or can you use chords from different scales, and then while those outlying chords are being played, solo in a fitting scale?

Also, what would keep you from stepping out of key, and how do you determine the key of a song?
#3
you can write a song in any order.


However I usually write chords first.


Are you only allowed to use chords that lie within the same scale? No... infact, that's the whole purpose of circle progressions, secondary dominants, and modulation. Its just a more complicated part of theory.

Can you use chords from different scales, and then while those outlying chords are being polayed, solo in a fitting scale?
That question needs to be rephrase, cause the way you said it is like... can you take chords from 2 scales and then find 1 scale.
And the answer to that would be yeah sure, but, in essence, you'd just be forgetting that you're basically taking those 2 chords out of the scale you have at the end, you just didnt realize it in writing. That was really complicated to say, try to rephrase it and my response will be easier on the mind lol.


Determing the key, imo, is easiest done by knowing the chords within a key.
By knowing the pattern of a major scale and knowing that the triads are based on Root, 3rd, and 5th, we will then know that the chords in the major are (capital roman numerals are major, lower are minor, dim marks diminished):
I ii iii IV V vi viidim


because of this, and knowing that the natural minor scale is the same as the major basically just from the vi, you know that the chords in natural minor are:
i iidim III iv v VI VII


then its easiest to analyze something like that, imo. Its easy to see the progression G, Em, C, and just say its I vi IV in G.


Nothing would keep you from stepping out of key other than your own desire, bud.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#4
Quote by BleedBlack247
dude.....dont worry about that b.s.....just do what sounds right an d feels right man


...and how do you plan to know why something "sounds right" without knowledge of theory?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Just analyse a couple of jazz songs.. See the possibilities!

Example: Autumn Leaves! (note: my version is in Em, not in Gm like some other are) It starts out in G but goes to it's relative minor Em, and because of the II-V-I (you know this sort of thing, don't you?) in Em, it's harmonic minor! Also, it goes down the circle of fifths a bit at the Em-A7-Dm-G7 part! Em-A7 is a II-V in D and Dm-G7 is a II-V in C

Meh, I wrote this up a bit messy, but you should just analyse a couple of songs to see what's possible


Edit: And to the guys discussing about the use of music theory.. Let's not abuse this thread. Make a separate thread for that.
#6
Quote by BleedBlack247
dude.....dont worry about that b.s.....just do what sounds right an d feels right man

Immediately disregard anybody who says something like this.

Because they're ignorant.
Looking for my India/Django.