#1
WHWWHWW is the way a minor scale is made up so for a D minor shouldnt it go
D E F G A Bflat C D...cause on this one site it says after the bflat is a csharp and bflat to C Sharp is more than a whole step...
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,
#2
I don't get it?

D minor scale
D E F G A Bflat(A#) C D

You are correct on the intervals


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#4
Wow, that's odd.
Hmm.
Well anyone can edit wikipedia so it might have been tampered with. I'm pretty sure you're right.


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#5
well im just learning scales so yeah..

i can pretty much only read tablature n some other stuff... :-(
I gotta quick question by the way it may sound real noobish but whatever:

For Major Scales your tones are WWHWWWH and can only consist of either of the strings EBGDAE

For Minor Scales you tones are WHWWHWW and can only consist of either of the strings EBGDAE

Im talking about just striking one of the open strings EBGDAE and using the open string to form the Major or Minor scale.

So my question is can you form a major or minor scale, lets say, on fret G on string E up the neck? If so does this have some special name or what?Basically im just wondering if you can form a scale from an already fretted note on the string.
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,
#7
Quote by Cheesepuff
It says it's harmonic minor at the end of the sentence. So actually it's right.


Oh you are right my friend.
Wikipedia is right, it's harmonic minor, not melodic minor.
What I told you was the Meloic Minor
Wikipedia has the harmonic minor.
Two different things.
Don't worry about it for now.


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#8
Quote by Unreal T
WHWWHWW is the way a minor scale is made up so for a D minor shouldnt it go
D E F G A Bflat C D...cause on this one site it says after the bflat is a csharp and bflat to C Sharp is more than a whole step...



There are three types of main minor scale:
Harmonic minor
Melodic Minor
Aeolian Mode

The Aeolian mode is generally recognised as the main minor scale.


First of all, let me explain intervals.
Intervals are used to make scales, not steps
I assume you know the major scale?

Lets take the C Major scale as an example:

C D E F G A B C


Intervals are used to give notes in a scale names depending on there posistion.
Lets add the intervals for the Major scale:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C


These set of intervals are UNIQUE to the major scale. They cant be used on anything other than the major scale.

However, you are allowed to change them to make other scales.
Lets change ours. Lets change 3 into a b3.

'b' means Flat. This means whatever note is under this b3, needs to be flattened.

If theres a B under it, B will be replaced with Bb.
If theres a G under it, G will be replaced with Gb.
If theres an F under it, F will be replaced with E.
And so on.

So, lets add this b3 to our scale:

1  2 b3  4  5  6  7  1
C  D Eb  F  G  A  B  C


See what i've done?

This is called the Melodic Minor scale!
So the intervals for the melodic minor are 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1.

Place these intervals against any major scale, and you will always be given the melodic minor scale.


Now you know about intervals, lets look at the 3 minor scales:

Harmonic minor
This has the intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 1
If you apply this against the C Major scale, you get:
C D Eb F G Ab B C


Melodic minor
Covered above;
Intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1

Aeolian mode
Now, this is a different type of scale.
This is a mode of the Major scale, which means its DIRECTLY related to the major scale.
I wont go into it here, because its very confusing.


The intervals for the Aeolian mode, are:
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1


Look at all these three scales and what do they have in common?
b3

b3 is called a minor 3rd - Or, the minor 3rd interval.
Add this to any chord / scale and it'll have a minor tone to it.

Likewise, if you kept is as 3, this is called a Major 3rd - Or, Major 3rd interval.

If you need any help, just ask!
Been away, am back
#9
Quote by Unreal T
well im just learning scales so yeah..

i can pretty much only read tablature n some other stuff... :-(
I gotta quick question by the way it may sound real noobish but whatever:

For Major Scales your tones are WWHWWWH and can only consist of either of the strings EBGDAE

For Minor Scales you tones are WHWWHWW and can only consist of either of the strings EBGDAE

Im talking about just striking one of the open strings EBGDAE and using the open string to form the Major or Minor scale.


Okay, I think I understand your question, but I'm sorry if this is totally not what you mean.

Anyway, if you want to move the Minor Pentatonic scale (this is only hypothetical, you can move any scale practically anywhere) to another position on the neck...


G Minor Pentatonic scale

e-------------------------3-6-3------------------------|
B---------------------3-6-------6-3-------------------|
G----------------3-5----------------5-3---------------|
D------------3-5------------------------5-3-----------|
A--------3-5---------------------------------5-3------|
E--[3]-6-----------------------------------------6-3--|
     ^  this is your starting note, G


So what if you want to move this up the neck? Let's make it an A Minor Pentatonic!


A Minor Pentatonic scale

e-------------------------5-8-5------------------------|
B---------------------5-8-------8-5-------------------|
G----------------5-7----------------7-5---------------|
D------------5-7------------------------7-5-----------|
A--------5-7---------------------------------7-5------|
E--[5]-8-----------------------------------------8-5--|
     ^  this is your starting note, A


See? We just moved the scale position up to A. As long as you keep the scale pattern the same, you can move it up to any fret.

You mentioned something about using open strings to make scales? That can be done as well!


E Minor Pentatonic scale

e-------------------------0-3-0------------------------|
B---------------------0-3-------3-0-------------------|
G----------------0-2----------------2-0---------------|
D------------0-2------------------------2-0-----------|
A--------0-2---------------------------------2-0------|
E--[0]-3-----------------------------------------3-0--|
     ^  this is your starting note, E


As long as you keep the pattern the same, you can use open strings to play a scale.

So my question is can you form a major or minor scale, lets say, on fret G on string E up the neck? If so does this have some special name or what?Basically im just wondering if you can form a scale from an already fretted note on the string.


Do you mean, "Can I move a scale up the neck?" Because if that's what you mean by your question, I think I already covered that.

Or, do you mean, "Can I use a predetermined scale shape, but start on a different root note than the scale was made for?" The answer is yes. This is getting into modes, however. I'm a noob at modes, as I just started learning them a month or two ago. I do know that modes are basically scales with different root notes. I think you might want to take a look at modes, sometime.
#10
Quote by Logz
There are three types of main minor scale:
Harmonic minor
Melodic Minor
Aeolian Mode

The Aeolian mode is generally recognised as the main minor scale.


First of all, let me explain intervals.
Intervals are used to make scales, not steps
I assume you know the major scale?

Lets take the C Major scale as an example:

C D E F G A B C


Intervals are used to give notes in a scale names depending on there posistion.
Lets add the intervals for the Major scale:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
C D E F G A B C


These set of intervals are UNIQUE to the major scale. They cant be used on anything other than the major scale.

However, you are allowed to change them to make other scales.
Lets change ours. Lets change 3 into a b3.

'b' means Flat. This means whatever note is under this b3, needs to be flattened.

If theres a B under it, B will be replaced with Bb.
If theres a G under it, G will be replaced with Gb.
If theres an F under it, F will be replaced with E.
And so on.

So, lets add this b3 to our scale:

1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1
C D Eb F G A B C


See what i've done?

This is called the Melodic Minor scale!
So the intervals for the melodic minor are 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1.

Place these intervals against any major scale, and you will always be given the melodic minor scale.


Now you know about intervals, lets look at the 3 minor scales:

Harmonic minor
This has the intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 1
If you apply this against the C Major scale, you get:
C D Eb F G Ab B C


Melodic minor
Covered above;
Intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1

Aeolian mode
Now, this is a different type of scale.
This is a mode of the Major scale, which means its DIRECTLY related to the major scale.
I wont go into it here, because its very confusing.


The intervals for the Aeolian mode, are:
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1


Look at all these three scales and what do they have in common?
b3

b3 is called a minor 3rd - Or, the minor 3rd interval.
Add this to any chord / scale and it'll have a minor tone to it.

Likewise, if you kept is as 3, this is called a Major 3rd - Or, Major 3rd interval.

If you need any help, just ask!



Ok I just read about what you wrote about intervals. I see that if you take any Major scale such as C--CDEFGABC and you can use intervals as names for each of the notes CDEFGABC. Now you started from 1 and went to 7 and ended at one. Ok now what I dont get is what these intervals really mean. Does it mean the number of frets to move up the neck or something? And when you renamed the 3 that corresponded to the E a 3b, and then you named the E which was under the 3ba Eb makes no sense at all to me of why you did that :-( And for you to be saying that its a C major scale and then saying now its a Melodic Minor confuses the heck outta me and then you say its an aelioan mode..omg im really confused lol. How would you even know to make a 3 a 3b and the E a Eb to get the melodic minor anyways...
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,