#1
Can i use the high e string from my acoustic guitar and put it on my electric guitar?
Will it make any difference in sound?

Thanks in advance
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#2
dunno, try it
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#3
the different tensions required in acoustic and eletric guitars would f*ck em up
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#4
could you do it the other way around? electric string on acoustic?
#5
Yes. I know a guy who strung his acoustic with some old electric strings. It will work. But it sounds horrible.
#6
Just buy electric strings?
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#7
No, just slap some classic guitar strings on your electric. The sound is amazing. It makes a solid-state sound like a tube. Hope I helped.
#8
As far as I know, the metal used in many acoustic guitar strings isn't sufficiently magnetic for the pickups to sense the vibrations. Hence, it will do precisely jack and ****.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
A local luthier told me once that the tension is the same on an individual string on any guitar when in tune. Usually the acoustic strings are of a thicker guage than you would probably use on your electric. I would just buy a new set of electrics.
#10
Quote by Storrson
No, just slap some classic guitar strings on your electric. The sound is amazing. It makes a solid-state sound like a tube. Hope I helped.


im pretty sure that wont do anything ...
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#11
seriously, there's no difference, at least with most string manufacturers...

see, the high e is plain steel on both styles of guitars (perhaps the tension is different but I doubt it)

for example, GHS makes their plain steel strings interchangeable. The packaging actually says "acoustic or electric" on them!

The only real difference in sound/feel is the wound strings: acoustic's are wound with bronze; whereas electrics with nickel...
hope that helps
#12
Quote by Storrson
No, just slap some classic guitar strings on your electric. The sound is amazing. It makes a solid-state sound like a tube. Hope I helped.



You've never had a tube amp before, have you? Classical strings on an electric sound like ass, I've seen it half a dozen times and it never turns out right. If classical strings made solid states sound like tubies, nobody'd be buying tube amps anymore, would they?

And yet, they still do...
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#13
The e and b strings should be fine if it's steep string. On my Ernie Ball strings it says Electric or Acoustic string on the e and B (possibly G) strings. The only thing is that you probably don't use the same gauge strings for acoustic and electric playing.
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#14
right now i have an acoustic high e as my electric guitar's B, it's about the same size. i wouldn't recommend it, but it'll work in a pinch.
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#15
I've put electric strings on my acoustic once and it was so damn bad...my low E wasn't even audible in a chord.

I've never done the other way around though...but what I DO want to try sometime is to put a bass 0.085 to replace my low E on my electric like Wes Borland did for his 4-string...I think that would sound awesome
#16
Quote by fireman464
A local luthier told me once that the tension is the same on an individual string on any guitar when in tune. Usually the acoustic strings are of a thicker guage than you would probably use on your electric. I would just buy a new set of electrics.


Yes, the tension on the strings would be the same, but not on the neck of the guitar where it actually matters.
#17
Quote by fireman464
A local luthier told me once that the tension is the same on an individual string on any guitar when in tune. Usually the acoustic strings are of a thicker guage than you would probably use on your electric. I would just buy a new set of electrics.



So you don't misunderstand, this definitely not true if they're different guages, and accoustic strings are generally a bit thicker. I suppose that the plain strings, if the same guage, are probably the same. It's an interesting question.


Slurgi
#18
Depends how magnetic acoustic guitar strings are.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#20
definately does NOT make a solid state sound like a tube (i've done this before) and the previous poster who said that the tension on the neck would be minimal and it would jack up the neck is correct (though it doesn't really screw it up, you'd just have to have the intonation reset and it does sound kinda crappy, i might do it just to have a different sound for recording a bit in a song, but not for all the time)
#21
Quote by cubs
well i always use electric guitars strings on my acoustic, i seriously cant tell the difference


Then you're deaf of have a sh*t acoustic. There's a reason that electric and acoustic guitar strings come in different packets.
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#22
Sure, it'll work, assuming they're metal strings and the correct guage you want. And of course if the strings have that "ball" end, as most electric guitars I've seen require them.

Strings aren't magnetic, period. As long as they're metal, the pickups will pick them up.