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#1
I am interested in learning the Pentatonic Scales because I think its closely related to rock music? I would like to know though how these scales are orginated and easy ways to play and understand them. I really have no knowledge about music theory at all. All I can do on the guitar is locate any single note, read tablature, and yep, thats about it. So please be very basic as posissible if you give me any help. THANKS a LOT!!
#2
by the way i read the tutorial here and its a bit confusing. I know that a major scale is composed of WHWWWH however I do not know what intervals are. I also know that between every natural note there is a whole step, except bc and ef which is a half step. The guy who wrote the tutorial on this site says you should know major scale and intervals, and i dont know what the heck an interval is...so please help me out here on what i need to know so i can understand pentatonic scales more easier
#3
Pentatonic Scales are called that because they contain five different notes within one octave. Penta = Five. Tonic = Tone/Note.

Five Tonics = Pentatonic.

Now - before you delve into pentatonic construction I'd highly recommend you experiment with major scale construction first. As the pentatonic scales are derived and based on the major scale; it will give you a deeper and more theoretical understanding of their origination and construction.

Although, perhaps - if you can 'locate any single note on the guitar' - I can give you example of an Aminor Pentatonic Scale, then you can reply with the name of each note and then we can delve into why those notes are.


[B][U]Aminor Pentatonic Scale[/U][/B].

|---------------|
|---------------|
|---------------|
|-------------5-|
|-------5--7----|
|-5--8----------|
#4
Quote by Johnljones7443
Pentatonic Scales are called that because they contain five different notes within one octave. Penta = Five. Tonic = Tone/Note.

Five Tonics = Pentatonic.

Now - before you delve into pentatonic construction I'd highly recommend you experiment with major scale construction first. As the pentatonic scales are derived and based on the major scale; it will give you a deeper and more theoretical understanding of their origination and construction.

Although, perhaps - if you can 'locate any single note on the guitar' - I can give you example of an Aminor Pentatonic Scale, then you can reply with the name of each note and then we can delve into why those notes are.


[B][U]Aminor Pentatonic Scale[/U][/B].

|---------------|
|---------------|
|---------------|
|-------------5-|
|-------5--7----|
|-5--8----------|


A C D E G ...Aminor cause it starts with A as the root
#5
so this is going to be basic, with no perfect intervals and stuff....

major scales are just WWH W WWH
which pretty much is whole whole half whole whole whole half...

the wholes and halves are the intervals.
an interval is just the space between two notes.

for example, in c maj (i know everyone uses this):

C D E F G A B C
C > D is whole (and called seconds)
D > E is whole (also seconds)
E > F is half (yep)
etc.

but C > E is W W (called thirds) and so is D>F and E>G etc.
C > F etc. is 4ths
C > G etc. is 5ths
C > A etc. is 6ths
C > B etc. is 7ths

so in say D maj (pretty common in punk rock):

D E F# G A B C# D

use your root note and the intervals to get all the notes in a scale.
so on the guitar, go up 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 frets to go a whole octave.
then play it over and over again, drilling it into your head.

once you have the scale down, have someone play some power chords or a progression you want to use (or make a backing track) and improv. off of the scale.

keep in mind, 3rds and 5ths sound pretty good with power chords.
and when you're improving, keep in mind any themes you create with riffs and try and use equal timings (like all eighth notes) until you have an idea of what you want, then use sixteenth, quarter, bends, hammerons, pulloffs, trills, etc. to taste.

it's using this repetitive drilling that helps so much when you really need a good riff.
it also sets you apart from "cookie cutter" bands that use all power chords with just a riff someone else wrote, just transposed to a new key.

hope i made sense. enjoy!

~~t valeri
#6
purplemunkee seems to have explained the basis of what I was going to explain - but if it's still cloudy to you - I will post what I was going to and go into more detail on major scale construction and how the pentatonic scale is derived.
#7
Ok well I know how to take any root note such as D or C and make it itnto a major scale...you just use WWHWWWH in which you move up that many spaces, or intervals i believe they are called...correct me if i am wrong.

I dont get what he means by thirds ,fourths, fifths and all that. I see that going from C-E is two wholes...I am just confused on all the fraction stuff here now

he said that d-f is two Wholes ...isnt it only 1 and a half...confusing
#8
Quote by Unreal T
Ok well I know how to take any root note such as D or C and make it itnto a major scale...you just use WWHWWWH in which you move up that many spaces, or intervals i believe they are called...correct me if i am wrong.

I dont get what he means by thirds ,fourths, fifths and all that. I see that going from C-E is two wholes...I am just confused on all the fraction stuff here now

he said that d-f is two Wholes ...isnt it only 1 and a half...confusing


Yes - you construct the major scale using WWHWWWH on the basis of the chromatic scale.

If you're willing and are still utterly confused on major scale construction (You can give me an example if you want, to clear things up - construct me the C major scale using WWHWWWH)... then we can delve into what he means by '3rd, 4ths and 5ths'.
#9
C Major Scale---CDEFGABC

Based on Chromatic Scale...dunno what that means but Im sure it will come along once I get into the Chromatic Scale..
#10
^That is correct... but my understanding is that you simply copied what was in purplemunkees post, but anyway - let's go.

The Chromatic Scale contains the twelve notes of Western Music all seperated by one half step. Seeing as we're in the key of C, here's the Chromatic Scale in the key of C.


[B][U]C Chromatic Scale[/U][/B].

[B]C - C# - D - D# - E - F - F# - G - G# - A - A# - B - C[/B].


From C to C# is half a step - Half.
From C to D is a whole step - Whole.

Major Scale Construction using the WWHWWWH formula is used in accordance with the chromatic scale.

As we're in the key of C, our tonic note is going to be C. Our root note.


[B]C[/B] to D = [B]W[/B]. 
[B]D[/B] to E = [B]W[/B].
[B]E[/B] to F = [B]H[/B].
[B]F[/B] to G = [B]W[/B].
[B]G[/B] to A = [B]W[/B].
[B]A[/B] to B = [B]W[/B].
[B]B[/B] to C = [B]H[/B].

[B][U]C Major Scale[/U][/B].

C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C.
  W - W - H - W - W - W - H.

For the purpose of future explanation let us 
label each note with a number.
For the major scale, this [B]scale degree[/B] pattern is: 

[B]1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 1.[/B]

C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C.
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 1.


As you can see - using the formula of whole steps and half steps we have figured out the C major scale in relation the chromatic scale.

Before I go any further, I'll let you take a gander at this and see if you're grasping the concept well enough to progress further into scales in relation to the major scale.

If not, ask away.
#11
Quote by Johnljones7443
^That is correct... but my understanding is that you simply copied what was in purplemunkees post, but anyway - let's go.

The Chromatic Scale contains the twelve notes of Western Music all seperated by one half step. Seeing as we're in the key of C, here's the Chromatic Scale in the key of C.


[B][U]C Chromatic Scale[/U][/B].

[B]C - C# - D - D# - E - F - F# - G - G# - A - A# - B - C[/B].


From C to C# is half a step - Half.
From C to D is a whole step - Whole.

Major Scale Construction using the WWHWWWH formula is used in accordance with the chromatic scale.

As we're in the key of C, our tonic note is going to be C. Our root note.


[B]C[/B] to D = [B]W[/B].
[B]D[/B] to E = [B]W[/B].
[B]E[/B] to F = [B]H[/B].
[B]F[/B] to G = [B]W[/B].
[B]G[/B] to A = [B]W[/B].
[B]A[/B] to B = [B]W[/B].
[B]B[/B] to C = [B]H[/B].

[B][U]C Major Scale[/U][/B].

C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C.
W - W - H - W - W - W - H.

For the purpose of future explanation let us
label each note with a number.
For the major scale, this [B]scale degree[/B] pattern is:

[B]1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 1.[/B]

C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C.
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 1.


As you can see - using the formula of whole steps and half steps we have figured out the C major scale in relation the chromatic scale.

Before I go any further, I'll let you take a gander at this and see if you're grasping the concept well enough to progress further into scales in relation to the major scale.

If not, ask away.


Ok so, The chromatic scale is a series of HALF STEPS that contains 12 Notes. I see that using C you simply moved up half steps until you formed 12 notes. And your root or TONIC note was C. And the degree pattern for MAJOR scales is 12345671 and you just labeled the Cmaj scales notes with those numbers...got ya so far, correct me if I am wrong with anything in this paragraph, if im correct keep going man, i really appreciate your help!!!
#12
Quote by Unreal T
And the degree pattern for MAJOR scales is 12345671 and you just labeled the Cmaj scales notes with those numbers...


No that's only the pattern for the C Major scale. The D Major scale is 1 2 3# 4 5 6 7#

The C Major and A Minor are the only scales without sharps or flats. The Cmajor and the A Major are relative (Meaning they have exactly the same notes) the only difference is, they have a different root note. All major scales have a relative minor scale.
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"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#14
Quote by Unreal T
ahhh! Now I am getting confused...now the numbers are all sharps n what not..!!


Check my post again. I edited.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#15
So is this right...lets say I got a D major scale and where to label it with the degrees...

D E F# G A B C Dflat

1 2 3# 4 5 6 7flat
#16
Quote by Unreal T
So is this right...lets say I got a D major scale and where to label it with the degrees...

D E F# G A B C C#

1 2 3# 4 5 6 7# ???


Why have you put a C# on the end?

D Major: D E F# G A B C#

If you really wnated to include the 8th degree, it would be the root note once again (D), only an octave higher.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#17
Quote by Smokey Amp
No that's only the pattern for the C Major scale. The D Major scale is 1 2 3# 4 5 6 7#


No... the scale degree formula 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 applies to every major scale.

Using your logic - and 1 2 3# 4 5 6 7# in relation to the Cmajor scale, the Dmajor scale would contain the notes:

C - D - E# - F - G - A - B# - which we know, is wrong. The Dmajor scale contains the notes - D - E - F# - G - A - B - C#.

I can see what you were saying though Dave - but that doesn't apply to the WWHWWWH formula or the scale degree concept in relation to the major scale that I'm trying to get across to UnrealT.

UnrealT - as it's 03.51am here, I'm in dire need of sleep so won't be able to continue at this very moment, I apologise. You can check back tomorrow and I will remind myself to finish off what I was explaining - although, by that time - the helpful bunch in MT will have taken care of it.

Goodnight.
#18
Quote by Johnljones7443
No... the scale degree formula 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 applies to every major scale.

Using your logic - and 1 2 3# 4 5 6 7# in relation to the Cmajor scale, the Dmajor scale would contain the notes:

C - D - E# - F - G - A - B# - which we know, is wrong. The Dmajor scale contains the notes - D - E - F# - G - A - B - C#.


Oh ****, you're right. I forget that the degree patterns are always relative to the C Major scale. It was a long time since I learnt theory.

But yes, I remember now. Everything else I said was true.
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"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#19
So, threadstrater, the scale degrees for the D Major Scale are as follows:

1# 2 3 4# 5 6 7
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#20
Quote by Smokey Amp
Oh ****, you're right. I forget that the degree patterns are always relative to the C Major scale. It was a long time since I learnt theory.

But yes, I remember now. Everything else I said was true.


They're not relative to the C Major scale - but scale degrees are relative to the parallel Major scale - i.e 1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7 would be the Minor scale in relation to the parallel major scale.

That is, the Cminor scale would be the parallel Minor of Cmajor.

Anyway - sleep!
#21
Quote by Johnljones7443
They're not relative to the C Major scale - but scale degrees are relative to the parallel Major scale - i.e 1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7 would be the Minor scale in relation to the parallel major scale.

That is, the Cminor scale would be the parallel Minor of Cmajor.

Anyway - sleep!


Well, I didn't mean to confuse you by using a theory term like "relative". What I meant was, the C Major scale is the basis for the degrees and all other scales are built off of that.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#22
?So for all major scales you use 1234567 ? JohnJames said before you use 12345671 as a degree pattern...now im confused..
#23
Quote by Unreal T
?So for all major scales you use 1234567 ? JohnJames said before you use 12345671 as a degree pattern...now im confused..


The 1 on the end is just the root note again, but an octave higher.

Let me help you understand by putting it into practice:

Play the open E string on your guitar. Now, play the 12th fret of the same E-string on your guitar. You'll hear that they're the same ntoe, only one of them is of higher pitch. That is the result of the scale starting over at a new octave. You don't have to include the 1 on the end of the scale as a scale is really only 7 notes before the octave.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
Last edited by Smokey Amp at Jul 30, 2006,
#24
Ok I got you...

But for Dmaj

D E F# G A B C# D

the 2 d's are octaves and this degree pattern is 1 2 3# 4 5 6 7# 8...8 being the octave
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,
#25
No, no. There's no C# or bD as the 8th note. As I said, the 8th ntoe is the ocatve of the root. The root ntoe of the D Major scale is D (Again, an octave higer).

D Major scale: D E F# G A B C# D

1# is for the scale degrees. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 means C D E F G A B C

So, to get the clean scale degrees to match the D Major Scale, the first degrees (C) would have to be sharpened = #1 and so would the 4th degrees (F) = 4#. That's how it works.

Just because the D Major Scale starts with the root note D doens;t mean that it's representation is degrees does.

No, the degree pattern for the D Major Scale is 1# 2 3 4# 5 6 7

Everything else you said is right.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
Last edited by Smokey Amp at Jul 30, 2006,
#26
Ok I see you have D E F# G A B C# D

Now I thought you just placed 1-7 accordingly to those notes...I do not understand why you are sharpening up 1 to a 1#

Do you mean you are using the C major scale which is the root of all the major scales CDEFGABC and somehow corresponding that to the D scale in relation to its degrees???
#27
Quote by Unreal T
Ok I see you have D E F# G A B C# D

Now I thought you just placed 1-7 accordingly to those notes...I do not understand why you are sharpening up 1 to a 1#

Do you mean you are using the C major scale which is the root of all the major scales CDEFGABC and somehow corresponding that to the D scale in relation to its degrees???


The 1-7 is always the C Major scale, because it's the only scale with all natural notes. Once you start flattening and sharpening notes, it's easier to to identify the major scale it is representing. If all degrees stated from a different root note, it would be no different than writing the scale itself.

Like I said I haven't touched theory in a long, long time. But, this is how Johnljones said it was and it's how I remember. So, it should be right.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#28
i dont understand even what degrees are used for is it just to symbolise the notes or what?

Still, I do not understand why a Dmajor scales first degree is a 1# when the first note of a D Major scale is a D with no sharp

ya i see how the Cmaj scale is no sharps or flats in it and is used to make other major scales
Last edited by Unreal T at Jul 30, 2006,
#29
Alright, I''ll tell you what I think is right.

When we're tlaking about degress, it always relates to the C Major scale., for the simple reason the the C Major scale is full of natural notes (No sharps or flats). So:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B

Now, beause everytime we talk about degrees we are using the above template then then the D Major Scale would primarily lookt he same:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B

Now, add all the sharps from the D Major scale (D E F# G A B C# D):

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
C# D E F# G A B

So, now you look at this 7 note degree and you say "Oh, well, that has two sharps". So, you can then look at the circle of fiths and find out which scale that is. In this case obviously D Major or B Minor (The relative minor).
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

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#30
start over and **** all this #3 stuff. #3 teaches you nothing.


You learnt the pattern for the major scale. You learned WWHWWWH.

That's good.


You can compose any scale by thinking about it, and that's all you need. This 3# stuff... I've never heard of that before this thread, no one calls it that, and it will only confuse you as seen by your confusion within this thread.


Say you want D major, you start at D, go up a whole step, you get E, bla bla bla, I explained all this in your thread last night, your other one.
You know what D major is, you know its D E F# G A B C# D.


But, for the sake of you learning intervals, Im going to stick to the very simple C.


Intervals are in essence, the number of their appearance in the major scale... it goes a lot deeper when you get into other scales, but for the sake of learning it now, lets look at it like this


The first note in C major is C.
The second note in C major is D.
The third note in C is E.
Fourth is F.
Fifth is G.
Sixth is A.
Seventh is B.


The fourth and fifth are called perfect. They're called this because of how they bond in soundwaves with the root- but basically, to keep it simple, they're called perfects because they sound good in almost any context.


Every thing else, atleast for now, is called major.


D? the major 2nd of C.
E? the major 3rd of C.
F? the perfect 4th of C.
G? the perfect 5th.
A the major 6th, B the major 7th, and C is the octave.


this explains your absolute basics to intervals.


The 4th, 5th, and Root/Octave are the perfect intervals of the major scale.


To find out the names for intervals, use this chart:


             Diminished <- PERFECT -> Augmented
Diminished <-   Minor   <-  MAJOR  -> Augmented


All arrows indicate a move of a halfstep. <- indicates lowered a halfstep. -> indicates raised a halfstep.


For this reason, D is the major 2nd of C.
Db is the minor 2nd of C.
For this reason, you also now know why "C#" and "Db", although they sound the same, are different theoretically. They are differently theoretically because the names of the intervals are different.

C# is an augmented 1 or augmented 8.
Db is a minor 2nd.


Another example is Gb.

Gb is a diminished 5th of C.
F# is an augmented 4th of C.

Tell me if you get all that, and ask any questions you have.
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#32
Quote by UtBDan
start over and **** all this #3 stuff. #3 teaches you nothing.


You learnt the pattern for the major scale. You learned WWHWWWH.

That's good.


You can compose any scale by thinking about it, and that's all you need. This 3# stuff... I've never heard of that before this thread, no one calls it that, and it will only confuse you as seen by your confusion within this thread.


Say you want D major, you start at D, go up a whole step, you get E, bla bla bla, I explained all this in your thread last night, your other one.
You know what D major is, you know its D E F# G A B C# D.


But, for the sake of you learning intervals, Im going to stick to the very simple C.


Intervals are in essence, the number of their appearance in the major scale... it goes a lot deeper when you get into other scales, but for the sake of learning it now, lets look at it like this


The first note in C major is C.
The second note in C major is D.
The third note in C is E.
Fourth is F.
Fifth is G.
Sixth is A.
Seventh is B.


The fourth and fifth are called perfect. They're called this because of how they bond in soundwaves with the root- but basically, to keep it simple, they're called perfects because they sound good in almost any context.


Every thing else, atleast for now, is called major.


D? the major 2nd of C.
E? the major 3rd of C.
F? the perfect 4th of C.
G? the perfect 5th.
A the major 6th, B the major 7th, and C is the octave.


this explains your absolute basics to intervals.


The 4th, 5th, and Root/Octave are the perfect intervals of the major scale.


To find out the names for intervals, use this chart:


Diminished <- PERFECT -> Augmented
Diminished <- Minor <- MAJOR -> Augmented


All arrows indicate a move of a halfstep. <- indicates lowered a halfstep. -> indicates raised a halfstep.


For this reason, D is the major 2nd of C.
Db is the minor 2nd of C.
For this reason, you also now know why "C#" and "Db", although they sound the same, are different theoretically. They are differently theoretically because the names of the intervals are different.

C# is an augmented 1 or augmented 8.
Db is a minor 2nd.


Tell me if you get all that, and ask any questions you have.


I agree the degrees are confusing, but Johnljones began to explain them, so I tried to help out.
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#33
lol, ok man I got you...hows this

For a Bmaj scale which is B C# D# E F# G# A# you would then take the Cmaj scale 1234567(no sharps or flats, pretty much the ground of major scales) and compare them...

B C# D# E F# G# A#

C D E F G A B ------add all sharps from the Bmaj scale to the Cmaj scale which would be

B C# D# E F# G# A# which turns out to be in degrees 1 2# 4# 4 5# 6# 7#....(i hope this is correct)
#34
stop doing it like that. Honestly, I've never even heard of any one do it like that before this thread and it teaches you absolutely nothing and has no usage.


I'm sorry if thats coming off as arrogant or mean, but... if you can compose the scale, why must you assign it 1 2# when compared to C major? that just seems liek something pulled out of an ass so someone could memorize the scales easier rather than actually learn them correctly.


Please look over my previous reply and tell me your thoughts.
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#35
Quote by Unreal T
lol, ok man I got you...hows this

For a Bmaj scale which is B C# D# E F# G# A# you would then take the Cmaj scale 1234567(no sharps or flats, pretty much the ground of major scales) and compare them...

B C# D# E F# G# A#

C D E F G A B ------add all sharps from the Bmaj scale to the Cmaj scale which would be

B C# D# E F# G# A# which turns out to be in degrees 1 2# 4# 4 5# 6# 7#....(i hope this is correct)


It's still incorrect in degrees. But, like UTB said, forget about degrees, it's consfusing and isn't really needed. Read UTB Dan's post and you should be good to go.
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#36
lol Dan...im just utterly confused it feels like im doing algebra than actually playing the dam guitar...

I know how to compose Major scales you just take any root and move up WHWWWH steps back at the octave again...but these degrees are making it seem like some calculus problem...im about to just give up with everything and forget and I dont wanna!!!!

Im gettin off for a bit..my head is achin, ill get back to your posts and hopefully figure this out! i appreciate all of your help by the way!!!
#37
I don't feel I can help out any further, my theory is limited as I haven't studied it for a while. I added a few useful things for you, but I'll let the MT regulars really help you out. They can go alot further in-depth than I ever can.

Good luck.
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#38
degrees? I said like 3 times, FORGET ABOUT DEGREES THEY TEACH YOU NOTHING


forget all this "degree" BS and look at my reply 2 replies ago, the big one.

If you dont get that, come back here.

just look at C major.


Everything except the 4th, 5th, and root/octave in a major scale is called a perfect interval.
The second note is thus called the major 2nd.
The third note is thus called the major 3rd.
The sixth is thus called the major 6th.
The seventh is thus called the major 7th.


You lower a major interval a halfstep, and its a minor interval.
You lower a minor interval a halfstep, and its a diminished interval.
You raise a major interval a halfstep, and its an augmented interval.
You raise a perfect interval a halfstep, and its an augmented interval.
You lower a perfect interval a halfstep, and its a diminished interval.


Which part is confusing you?

Quote by Smokey Amp
I think lurking in the Pit has dumbed me down somewhat. I used to be pretty damn good with theory.


you fooled me.
Quote by casualty01
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#39
Ok Dan...so I got you by saying that the CMaj Scale CDEFGABC and F and G are perfect intervals cause they sound pretty much the same as the root and are related to it. And that everything else is called what you said.

When you say D is the major 2nd of C I got you there but I dont understand "naming the intervals" using your chat there. I had in mind that an interbal is a move from one fret to another...

Again, I thank you for still helping me out and not giving up because I am sure you are about to! haha
#40
I'm not about to at all. We all have to learn at some point, and I remember knowing nothing and wanting to learn it all and fast.
Not saying you know nothing, just saying patience is a virtue.


OK, now, an interval... well I guess it is kinda move from one fret to another, but I wouldn't like to call it that.


You know D is the major 2nd of C and bla bla bla, you know all the names of the intervals within the major. That was the most basic part.


             Diminished <- PERFECT -> Augmented
Diminished <-   Minor   <-  MAJOR  -> Augmented


arrows indicate a move of a halfstep in the interval.


you say you don't understand this, but I think that's because I edited in the examples.
lol


D is the Major 2nd of C.
a major 2nd down a halfstep is a minor 2nd.
D down a halfstep is Db.

Thus, Db is the minor 2nd of C.


This is why theoretically, Db and C# are two different notes. Thereotically, C# is the augmented 1 or augmented octave of C, while Db is thereotically the minor 2nd of C.

Another example is Gb.

Gb is a diminished 5th of C.
F# is an augmented 4th of C.


Get it?
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