#2
well, really it depends on you, but in 4/4 the quarter note gets the beat, and in 2/2 the half note gets the beat, 4 beats per measure for 4/4 and 2 per measure for 2/2, but like I said it depends on how you count the beat, like say I like to count Ironman in 2/2 because its way easier on my foot and feels more natural.
Quote by Dan Steinman
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#3
Ill tell you as much as I know in regards to the beats (the measures are divided by " | "s):

4/4 = | 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & | 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & |
3/4 = | 1 & 2 & 3 & | 1 & 2 & 3 |
6/8 = | 1 & a 2 & a |1 & a 2 & a |
12/8 = | 1 & a 2 & a 3 & a 4 & a |
6/4 = | 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 & 5 & 6 |

That...might help...
#4
Quote by Vomitorator
I'm confused as to what the difference is... Like, if you gave me a song how could i tell whether it is 2/2 or 4/4.
It all has to do with notation. You can't hear the difference between 6/8 and 12/8. You could write the same lick in 12/8 or 6/8. It doesn't really matter.

If you want, I can write some stuff out in powertab.
#5
The main difference between 2/2 and 4/4 is that, say, a quarter note in 2/2 is twice as fast as in 4/4 because the half-note gets the beat instead of the quarter note.

The difference between 3/4 and 6/8 is that in 3/4 there are 3 strong beats in the measure (1 & 2 & 3 & and in 6/8 there are only 2 (1 & a 2 & a.) If you get 3/4 going fast enough, it can sound like 6/8 (or get 6/8 going slow enough, it can sound like 3/4.) Then the difference is just the notation used (an eight note in 3/4 instead of a sixteenth note in 6/8.)

The same difference that applies to 3/4 and 6/8 applies to 6/4 and 12/8, just the lengths of the measures are twice as long.

Overall, you can't really tell the difference between 2/2 and 4/4 just by listening to a song. It's just how it's notated on the page.
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#7
Isn't there also some more restriction on counting in the 'lowernumber' signatures, like 3/4? For example, I'd count 3/4 as 1 2 3 (of course?) while counting 6/8 (which many people see as just 2 x 3/4 or something) as 1 2 1 2 1 2. Also, 6/8 could be counted as 1 2 3 1 2 3 Is that the difference?

Also, vs threads aren't allowed! Reported.. jk
#8
really the main difference is on paper, but the different time signatures do have an effectr on beat emphasis, which is important to the feel of the peice.
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#9
Happy Birthday is 3/4. Playing it 6/8 would give it a more jolted, waltzy feel to it. So the difference is just where the beat is emphasised.
#10
it allows different groupings, and the timing would be different too, because of the different way of counting the beat. There is also a different on the emphasis of the beat, for example

A - accent
N - normal note

2/2
A N

4/4
A N A N

3/4
A N N

6/8

A N(because it's usually counted as 1 2, 3 quavers per accented note)

It's a bit difficult to explain, but you can hear the difference, at least I can, listen to some classical pieces andyou will understand what i mean.
#11
Quote by elvenkindje
Isn't there also some more restriction on counting in the 'lowernumber' signatures, like 3/4? For example, I'd count 3/4 as 1 2 3 (of course?) while counting 6/8 (which many people see as just 2 x 3/4 or something) as 1 2 1 2 1 2. Also, 6/8 could be counted as 1 2 3 1 2 3 Is that the difference?

Also, vs threads aren't allowed! Reported.. jk
I see 1 2 1 2 1 2 as 8th notes in 3/4. Yes, it's the same as 6/8, but 6/8 is usually felt as triplets.

If you're counting 6/8, you shouldn't count it as 1 2 3 1 2 3. You should count it 1 2 3 2 2 3.
#12
Quote by Vomitorator
I'm confused as to what the difference is... Like, if you gave me a song how could i tell whether it is 2/2 or 4/4.


The way you can normally tell the difference mate is by listening to the drums-in particular when the drummer hits a crash typically. Not always the case but common.

Another thing to consider is if it is a more simple composition eg a nurseryrhyme 2/2 will be used but if you were playing like Beethoven Concertos or something you would end up having like 1000 bars due to the amount of notes/chords they may use-difficult to orchestrate and reherse
#13
basically it comes down to which beats are emphasized. As stated above, 3/4 would emphasize One, Two, Three but 6/8 would be like One and a Two and a
#14
its all where the main beats (or pulses) fall within the bar, this is where simple and compound time comes into things.

as i understand, compound time is anything where the top number is divisible by 3, but is not 3 itself (so 6 9 12 etc..) and simple time is everything else (?)

i think simple time only has one pulse per bar and this makes it different to compound time
like 4/4 would be counted (1 2 3 4). 5/4 would be counted (1 2 3 4 5)

in compound time, you need to divide the top number by three to find out the number of pulses in each bar, this is basically how you find the groupings...

so take 6/8, you divide the top number by 3 to give 2, this means there are 2 pulses in the bar, and because each will last the duration of 3 quavers, this is gonna be equal to two dotted crotchets...or 2 groups of 3 quaver notes...counted (123 123)

now lets try 12/4. Divide 12 by 3 which gives 4, so there are four pulses within the bar, each lasting 3 notes, so this will be equal to 4 dotted crotchets...or 4 groups of 3 quavers counted (123 123 123 123)

i hope i got everything right there and didnt confuse you