#1
I mean, a tree...that was cut down, so now I have logs.
It's maple.
I'm probably going to make a strat...just because I love strats.

But I have a few questions:

What sound will maple have?
Which way to I cuz the log. Cut a circle(rings showing), or lengthwise to get a rectangle?

Thank, and I will be posting pictures throughout the steps.
#2
"The tone is very bright with long sustain and a lot of bite." that is straight off of warmoth's site. and you definitly want to cut length wise and than plane it so it is perfectly flat.
#4
well, I'm not gonna be using it any time soon. So, I'm just gonna cuz it and everything. It's already been drying for a somewhat good amount of time and probably will after it's cut.
I also have as much maple as I need, so I'm gonna expiriment and let some of it dry for a while.
#5
Worse comes to worse just find someone in your area with a wood drying kiln
#6
well, just a warning, afte ryou cut it- you have to store it wiht weight on it or it will warp on you, an dno longer be level- afte rthat, you cant cut it again- cu z you grain will be twisted


and if you let it cur in logs it will split in the middle most likely
#7
I'm not a wood expert but what i'd do is cut it up into slabs, put some parrafin wax on the ends to stop the mositure leaving the end grain quicker than the rest, which can cause checking. and leave it to dry til it's around 8-12% moisture content. You can measure the moisture contact with a special gizmo but i beleive you can also measure by weighting the wood after it's cut and weighting it at intervals. The general rule for air drying is 1 year for every inch of thickness.
#8
First of all, all the logs big enough to be resawn into planks? Do you have a bandsaw that is capable of resawing these logs? How are you going to saw them into planks, quarter sawn, flat sawn, plain sawn, rift sawn? Green wood is not something you want to use unless you're ready to let it dry. Remember, seal the ends with wax or paint, place something VERY heavy on it so it doesnt warp and make sure you have time to let the piece dry (1 year for every 1" thickness).

The area you're storing it in should have a very good airflow, and the edges should be exposed. Make sure you're rotating your board too.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#9
the logs get up to like 3 feet by 5 feet, so they should be big enough
Break it down and then break it up again
Me and my guitar drowning down and down
#10
Can you resaw them? How are you going to resaw them? Do you have a temp. controlled area to store them for drying?

Also what type of maple is this? Different maple species produce different properties.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#11
I dunno what I am going to use yet to resaw, but I have a bunch of different saws in the basement, electric and hand. I do have a temp. controlled room. And I don't know what kind of maple it is, I am still trying to indentify it.
Break it down and then break it up again
Me and my guitar drowning down and down
#12
If have saw mill or lumber yard near you they'll have the right saws the mill the wood, i can't imagine it costing you that much to have them do it. I doubt you'll be able to resaw that wood with any saws you have.