#1
ive been playing guitar for 2 and a half years now, i started trying to alternate pick about four months ago and i can go as fast as i want but i move at my elbow instead of my wrist like most people. Is that bad? will it limit my playing? i cant change strings very well either. Should i teach myself how to alternate pick the other way ahh im confused sorry
Quote by MightyAl
The best way to approach a group of girls is wearing a dirty old trenchcoat with nothing underneath. Open it in slow motion, while making your 'orgasm face', and then run like hell.

]
#2
wow, alternate picking with half your arm must be exhausting. seriously, do it with your wrist and you'll be able to go ten times faster. this all sounds so dirty.
come and join the youth and beauty brigade

#5 member of the club that isn't terribly prejudiced against emo. Get over yourselves.
#3
i cant go fast with my wrist though
Quote by MightyAl
The best way to approach a group of girls is wearing a dirty old trenchcoat with nothing underneath. Open it in slow motion, while making your 'orgasm face', and then run like hell.

]
#4
Definitely using the wrist is superior, doing it from the elbow can definitely cause tennis elbow due to repeat movement of joints, thus wearing out the sinovial sac. it can also cause tendonitis(same for wrist too, if improper exertion).

Using the wrist, will definitely get you much further, doing it from the elbow can make you tire out very quickly, tense up and perhaps damage some of the muscle fibres.

If your technique is improper from the wrist, then you will get Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, probably the most common injury that musicians get(yes, even vocalists )

If you relax, use your wrist, then elbow movement is not needed.

RELAX! All your problems will be solved.
#5
TWO AND A HALF YEARS AND YOU JUST STARTED ALTERNATE PICKING? WHAT THE ****!?

Sorry. I'm done now. I alternate pick with my wrist, but tremelo pick with my arm and it doesn't make me tired at all. I suppose it's all about endurance, something that comes with excercise. My dad taught me how to alternate pick first thing. I originally tried to down pick, and the first five minutes I held a guitar I got smacker upside the head for it.
"Chuck-E-Cheese called. They want their band back."
#6
well u see i knew how before that but i got serious about like speeding up around four months ago and i can alternate pick normally like 140 bpm sixteenth notes but only for a short time i can do my fast **** really fast and i dont get tired or anything
Quote by MightyAl
The best way to approach a group of girls is wearing a dirty old trenchcoat with nothing underneath. Open it in slow motion, while making your 'orgasm face', and then run like hell.

]
#7
Sixteenth notes at 140 bmp really isn't fast at all. I can regularly alternate pick sixteenth notes at around 170 or 180 bpm before I have to start using my arm, in which case I still don't get tired. I'm just persistant and ignorant. Seriously, the more you practice with your wrist, the faster you'll go.
"Chuck-E-Cheese called. They want their band back."
#8
just stop and worry if somethings starts to hurt

and if you feel you can't go over a certain hump in your learning (mayyybe because you're doing something wrong) , then try and look more into "correct" technique, since most instructors or people who have been playing longer can share their knowledge on what works good for getting over humps because they have more experience :P
Neste@
Cool@
To the core!
#9
I would counter the "conventional wisdom" of wrist-only with this: you NEED to
have motion from BOTH elbow and wrist to be able to pick well. It is a blending
of both motions and the situation will determine when and where you use more
wrist or more elbow. You ignore the elbow at the peril of it being tensed up and
affecting your picking accuracy and speed.

Most beginners I would say have a less problem using the wrist. They just want
to see how fast they can go, so they plonk thier hand down on the guitar to
steady it and then try to tremelo pick as fast as they can on a single string. If
they manage to attain some accuracy and speed with that, they can then claim how
fast they can pick. But when it comes to picking runs across strings, they tend to
fall apart because they've ignored the elbow.

I think it's actually better to work on your elbow first (larger muscle groups to
smaller), before working on your wrist. Elbow control is very important and usually
ignored.
#10
Quote by edg
I would counter the "conventional wisdom" of wrist-only with this: you NEED to
have motion from BOTH elbow and wrist to be able to pick well. It is a blending
of both motions and the situation will determine when and where you use more
wrist or more elbow. You ignore the elbow at the peril of it being tensed up and
affecting your picking accuracy and speed.

Most beginners I would say have a less problem using the wrist. They just want
to see how fast they can go, so they plonk thier hand down on the guitar to
steady it and then try to tremelo pick as fast as they can on a single string. If
they manage to attain some accuracy and speed with that, they can then claim how
fast they can pick. But when it comes to picking runs across strings, they tend to
fall apart because they've ignored the elbow.

I think it's actually better to work on your elbow first (larger muscle groups to
smaller), before working on your wrist. Elbow control is very important and usually
ignored.


Well whatever floats your boat, but really, ergonomically, you should use your wrist and very small elbow movements. The moving the whole elbow uses quite a lot of muscles, meaning extended periods can cause fatigue quickly, and if not, you can tense up and injure yourself.

Using the wrist utilizes the most efficient way of moving without wasting too much energy, provided that you don't tense up.

Even picking at 3756239587nps, I disagree with using your elbow to pick, because at that speed, you'd be tiring out easily using all those large muscles.

However, the use of elbow IS necessary for example, when string skipping or lots and lots of sweep picking, however you are just using your elbow to adjust your wrist position so it's easier and you won't develop CTS. Again, it's just a matter of preference and whether if you want to get hurt or not.
#11
Well, in reality the elbow motion IS very small -- think of a very long lever and how
much movement the base of the lever would need to move the tip a few inches
back and forth. It would be almost imperceptable.

I am just saying elbow motion IS needed and you should factor it in to your
picking ability if you want to be a complete picker. Everyone saying wrist only
is sending people down the wrong path. As I said you need BOTH and since the
elbow is the most-often ignored, it's probably the thing you should work on first
as it gives overall control of which string the pick is located at.

I used to use only my wrist and until I paid attention to my elbow, I wasn't able
to do more demanding picking very well. I spent quite a bit of time working on
elbow control (and NOT anchoring) and now my picking is a lot more fluid and
much faster. I've never noticed any strain stress or pain CTS or whatever. In
fact my picking is now much more relaxed than it has ever been.

Well, what do I know? I've had every bad habit in the book and I've only been
playing 30 years. I still have a ways to go. So take whatever advice you think
is best....
#12
Quote by edg
Well, in reality the elbow motion IS very small -- think of a very long lever and how
much movement the base of the lever would need to move the tip a few inches
back and forth. It would be almost imperceptable.

I am just saying elbow motion IS needed and you should factor it in to your
picking ability if you want to be a complete picker. Everyone saying wrist only
is sending people down the wrong path. As I said you need BOTH and since the
elbow is the most-often ignored, it's probably the thing you should work on first
as it gives overall control of which string the pick is located at.

I used to use only my wrist and until I paid attention to my elbow, I wasn't able
to do more demanding picking very well. I spent quite a bit of time working on
elbow control (and NOT anchoring) and now my picking is a lot more fluid and
much faster. I've never noticed any strain stress or pain CTS or whatever. In
fact my picking is now much more relaxed than it has ever been.

Well, what do I know? I've had every bad habit in the book and I've only been
playing 30 years. I still have a ways to go. So take whatever advice you think
is best....


Yea, I was supporting your statement and just filling in some holes.
Don't make me poke holes in your boat with my tool
#13
i know some guitarists that are good and do that elbow pick style. janick gers for example and hes pretty fast.
but if i were you i'd learn to do it with my wrist. im just saying that the "elbow" approach isnt unheard of