#1
Ok so I've been playing a while now, but I'm wanting to learn some theory. Ok maybe not theory per-say, but I want to know the stuff I'm playing. I'm starting with Power Chords, because thery're what I play mostly, and I always though that they where named like C5 or such. The C being the first note fretted so like x355xx or x35xxx. This doesn't seem to be right though, I was looking at the chord section and a lot of the (note) 5 don't start on the named note. What am I doing wrong??? It's bugging the hell out of me
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#2
Quote by CodySG
Ok so I've been playing a while now, but I'm wanting to learn some theory. Ok maybe not theory per-say, but I want to know the stuff I'm playing. I'm starting with Power Chords, because thery're what I play mostly, and I always though that they where named like C5 or such. The C being the first note fretted so like x355xx or x35xxx. This doesn't seem to be right though, I was looking at the chord section and a lot of the (note) 5 don't start on the named note. What am I doing wrong??? It's bugging the hell out of me



Eh? Could you rephrase that?
#DTWD
#3
the 5 is relevant to the root of the chord based on the major scale.

so, C5 is C with the 5th note in the C major scale
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#4
Powerchords consist of the tonic and dominant (1st and 5th, respectively) - so you're correct in saying they're called X5.

I don't get what you mean by 'I was looking at the chord section and a lot of the (note) 5 don't start on the named note' - Sorry.
#5
the bottom note of a power chord is t he root.
next note up is the fifth. then the octave of the root.
#6
Yea the c powerchord is called C5, and so on. You name it, with the rootand then 5. X5. becaise your playing that root note, a 5th, and then a octive of the root note.

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#7
ok, say your playing an A5 power chord on the 5th fret of the E string. you have 3 notes in this chord. they are A, E, and A again. the A is the 1 note (root) and then you count A (1) , B (2), C (3), D (4), E (5), F (6), G (7), and back to A (8). therefore, the chord consists of the 1, 5, and 8 notes. the 1 and 8 notes are just the A part of the A5 name since they are the root. then the E is the 5th note. therefore the chord is named the A5 chord.
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#8
Ah! I'm sorry I was reading everything wrong, I was just seeing the X133XXX and not base fret 5 ect ect. I was right, just got confused there. Sorry for confusing everyone else lol!
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#10
Quote by CodySG
Ah! I'm sorry I was reading everything wrong, I was just seeing the X133XXX and not base fret 5 ect ect. I was right, just got confused there. Sorry for confusing everyone else lol!


You've confused me even more... 'base fret 5'? Wtf?

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#11
Quote by CodySG
Ah! I'm sorry I was reading everything wrong, I was just seeing the X133XXX and not base fret 5 ect ect. I was right, just got confused there. Sorry for confusing everyone else lol!

Err...Do you mean the root note on the 5th string?
#12
Power Chords

Power chords are a harmonic interval of a perfect 5th. They are neither minor nor major in their tonality. They are not really chords, as chords are 3 or more notes played simultaneously. A power chord only has 2 (root and 5th), which makes it an interval. Power chords are written in a progression as _5, named after their root note. For example, a D power chord would be written as D5.

Power chords are formed by taking the root and 5th (scale degrees 1 and 5) of the root note's major scale. For example, a C power chord:

..Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
........*.......*.....*


The first and 5th notes are those that comprise a power chord. Therefore, a C power chord is the notes C and G played simultaneously - no more, and no less. You may include octaves of these notes as you see fit to give different sounds to the power chords.

Some common shapes to play power chords are as follows:
e|-----------3--3-------------3--3--------------6-----6----|
B|--------3--3--3-------------x--x--------6--6--6--6--6-6--|
G|--------x--x--0-----5-----5-5--5--5--5--5--5--3--3--3-3--|
D|-----5--5--5--0--5--5--5--5-5--5--3--3--3--3--3-------3--|
A|--5--5--5--5--x--3--3--3--3-3--3-----3--3----------------|
E|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3----------3-------------------------|
....G5.............C5...............F5..........Bb5.........

G5 is notes G D
C5 is notes C G
F5 is notes F C
Bb5 is notes Bb F


-SD
#13
Awesome, thanks a ton SD! I get it now, off to learn about stuff I don't know!
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