#1
Well, I've been working with chord contruction, but I'm afraid I'm not comprehending it fully. I try making a major chord, but when I switch notes, say from like an EM to a BM or something off the top of my head, its always the exact same fingering. Is it like that or am I just not understanding the more complex rules of chord construction? Or does it change also depending on which string your root note is on? Thanks for the help...
#2
"EM" or "BM"? Like, "Emajor" and "Bmajor"?

A kind of chord often has a moveable shape...

-3--5-
-3--5-
-4--6-
-5--7-
-5--7-
-3--5-

Gmaj and Amaj, respectively. Same shape of the fingers, two different chords...

Perhaps specify your question a bit more... it's a tad on the vague side right now. I'm not sure I can answer any of your questions without confusing you entirely, because my answer will be vague as well.
Looking for my India/Django.
#3
If you are using barre chords, then the fingering will be the same, but on a different fret. What string the root note is on will depend on the chord shape you are using in the barre.
#4
Yes, on a barre chord all your index finger is really doing is acting like a nut that you can move.
Member of the 'Guitarists Born In 1991' Club. PM Greendayguitar, gdm09 or blues_rocker to join.

-Gibson LP Classic
-Fender American Standard Strat
-Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
-Peavey XXX w/Marshall Cab
#5
If you want to learn chord construction you should know that every chord has a root, a 3rd, and a 5th. For a Major chord you would use a major 3rd and for a Minor chord you would use a...you guessed it minor 3rd so lets say you want to play a C major and a C minor....

First lets look at the scale...
1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 - 8 (or octave)
C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C

To play a C major you need to locate the root, the major 3rd and the 5th.

so just find the note the corresponds with the correct number.

1(or root)= C, Major 3rd=E and the 5th= G

that gives you C,E, and G.

Now if you were to play a minor chord, the only difference is you play a minor third instead of a major third, to play a minor third simply flatten the major third one half step. This would give you.

C, Eb, and G.

And thats a C Minor!

Now I'm sure you can look up chord shapes and what not, their all over the internet, but now hopefully you have a little bit of insight to the basics of forming chords, It's really not as complicated as it seems.

Goodluck
Last edited by Wolf_At_TheDoor at Aug 1, 2006,
#6
Well, I understand how chords are formed. You'll have to excuse my "vague-ness". I guess to be more direct with my question, Why do I always get the same fingering for different chords on the same string? I just thought maybe I was missing soemthing with different patterns for the same chord... thanks for the help, but I think I understand it now. Thanks again.
#7
Well, every major chord is built of the same note degrees of it's tonic, and since the guitar is so shape-oriented, all you have to do is move the fingering around!
#8
You can change the shape of the fingering a little bit if you stay on the same string, but usually one fingering is easier to play and the other is a b*tch to play. Otherwise, to get a different fingering, you would probably have to change what string the root is on. It sounds like you're doing something like this:
|---|---|
|---|---|
|-1-|-8-|
|-2-|-9-|
|-2-|-9-|
|-0-|-7-|


for E major and B major (I assume that what you mean. Sorry if you meant the other way around or something completely different) I would play those like so:
|---|---|       |---|---|
|-9-|---|       |---|-4-|
|-9-|-8-|  or:  |-1-|-4-|
|-9-|-9-|       |-2-|-4-|
|-7-|-9-|       |-2-|-2-|
|---|-7-|       |-0-|---|

More likely the first one than the second one because that's the change where your hand moves the least.
METAR KTIK 040043Z COR RMK TORNADO 1W MOV NE. EVACUATING STATION