#1
My amp knowledge is seriously lacking. I know my fair share about guitars, but I know barely anything about amps.

I'd like to know if anyone can provide with me with a site or some sites that could help me out. I'd like to find out about how amps work, what different parts go into making them and which brands offer the best amps around.

By the time I'm done, I'd like to be able to look at the specs of an amp and make a personal decision on whether the various equipment used inisde the amp would produce a sound I'm looking for. As of now, all I see when I look at amps is the wattage and the effects. I'd like to be able compare amps myself, instead of a sales company trying to do it for me.

I hope you understand what I'm asking for, any help will be appreciated.

Thankyou.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#2
Quote by Smokey Amp
By the time I'm done, I'd like to be able to look at the specs of an amp and make a personal decision on whether the various equipment used inisde the amp would produce a sound I'm looking for.

That's impossible to know just by looking at specs.
Hi, I'm Peter
#3
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=149114

Good starting point on this very forum. In addition I would read a couple other "About Amplifiers" write-ups and after that just search around on various forums. Oh, and of course play a buttload of different amps.

You're not going to tell if an amp will give you the sound you want by looking at its specs, but you will be able to think in a detailed way about what exactly you want when you're amp shopping.

edit: Just found this site. Check it out. http://www.amptone.com
Gibson SG Standard
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Fulltone OCD
EH Holy Grail
Last edited by rockxwl at Aug 2, 2006,
#4
^ aye, but you can have a semi-vague idea based on the specs. It's true you need to try it though to see if your semi-vague idea is correct.

http://www.amptone.com/ (dunno if it's any good, I just googled)

http://www.drtube.com/guitamp.htm (ditto)
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
The best way to gain amp knowledge is to go down to GC, try a bunch out, and ask questions. People here are just going to say "VOX OMFG DUAL RECT GESUS!!! LMFAO TUBE N00B NO MG!!" without really giving you a reason why. You have to actually try out the amps to become knowledgable and understand the differences. Listening to some tone ***** you don't know isn't the way to go. If you have any specific questions about loudness and its relationship to wattage go ahead...
#6
Quote by rockxwl
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=149114

Good starting point on this very forum. In addition I would read a couple other "About Amplifiers" write-ups and after that just search around on various forums. Oh, and of course play a buttload of different amps.

You're not going to tell if an amp will give you the sound you want by looking at its specs, but you will be able to think in a detailed way about what exactly you want when you're amp shopping.

edit: Just found this site. Check it out. http://www.amptone.com


Thankyou, I've reada little of the link you've posted and it's exactly what I'm looking for. Please feel free to post any other articles like this if you know of any.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#7
Quote by NotAJock2Day
The best way to gain amp knowledge is to go down to GC, try a bunch out, and ask questions. People here are just going to say "VOX OMFG DUAL RECT GESUS!!! LMFAO TUBE N00B NO MG!!" without really giving you a reason why. You have to actually try out the amps to become knowledgable and understand the differences. Listening to some tone ***** you don't know isn't the way to go. If you have any specific questions about loudness and its relationship to wattage go ahead...


Personally I have always had bad experiences with Guitar Center employees. First off, they absolutely always are trying to sell you whatever it is you're asking about (which is to be expected considering it's their job). It's very hard to get any information out of them if they don't think you are going to be buying - not fun for the musician thirsty for knowledge. To go further, they also have severely dissapointed me with their lack of knowledge.

Case in point, I was actually at a GC a couple of days ago and asked a guy where their selection of tubes was and he said "oh...umm...we don't deal that much with tubes" before another guy came in and took over. Then I went over and played a BadCat and had a decent conversation with the new guy.
Gibson SG Standard
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Fulltone OCD
EH Holy Grail
#8
Quote by NotAJock2Day
The best way to gain amp knowledge is to go down to GC, try a bunch out, and ask questions. People here are just going to say "VOX OMFG DUAL RECT GESUS!!! LMFAO TUBE N00B NO MG!!" without really giving you a reason why. You have to actually try out the amps to become knowledgable and understand the differences. Listening to some tone ***** you don't know isn't the way to go. If you have any specific questions about loudness and its relationship to wattage go ahead...


If the GC employees are anything like a lot of the guitar shop employees over here, I'd run outside to check the sky if they told me it was blue.

The problem with guitar shop employees is (a) some aren't that bright, which isn't their fault, and you can't blame them for and (b) they have a vested interest to sell you as much crap as possible, whether you like it or not, and especially if they have it in stock. This is much more serious, as a lot of the time they'll actively be trying to sell you stuff that they know you'll want to upgrade later, since they hope to get two or three sales out of you.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Well, I read over that article, some things I understood, something will take me another read to grasp. One question:

I have always thought that you can only get a good overdriven sound out of a valve amp when you play at high volume. I thought that was the only way to make it clip and overdriven. So, if I bought a valve amp, would I have to play it at high volume constantly? My parents wouldn't like that too much, but I prefer valve to solid-state. I like the warmer sound.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#10
^ no if it has a master volume (i.e. a gain control), you can get overdrive at lower levels. Most modern amps (apart from re-issues or clones of older amps) have master volumes. though cranked does tend to sound better...

you could also use an overdrive pedal or clean boost/treble boost pedal to overdrive it at low volumes...

or alternatively, just buy a really low wattage valve amp (less than 5 watts) so you can crank it at lower volumes...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ no if it has a master volume (i.e. a gain control), you can get overdrive at lower levels. Most modern amps (apart from re-issues or clones of older amps) have master volumes. though cranked does tend to sound better...

you could also use an overdrive pedal or clean boost/treble boost pedal to overdrive it at low volumes...

or alternatively, just buy a really low wattage valve amp (less than 5 watts) so you can crank it at lower volumes...


Ah, thank goodness. I was once told I had to fork out for a power attenuator just to play overdriven at low volumes.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#12
Quote by Smokey Amp
Well, I read over that article, some things I understood, something will take me another read to grasp. One question:

I have always thought that you can only get a good overdriven sound out of a valve amp when you play at high volume. I thought that was the only way to make it clip and overdriven. So, if I bought a valve amp, would I have to play it at high volume constantly? My parents wouldn't like that too much, but I prefer valve to solid-state. I like the warmer sound.

The whole reason multi-channel amps with a preamp gain stage were created was so that you didn't have to crank the amp to get distortion. So get something with 2 or more channels and you're golden.
Hi, I'm Peter
#13
Quote by Dirk Gently
The whole reason multi-channel amps with a preamp gain stage were created was so that you didn't have to crank the amp to get distortion. So get something with 2 or more channels and you're golden.


Multi-channel?
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."
#14
Quote by Smokey Amp
Multi-channel?


Traditionally 2 channels. 1 for clean, one for overdrive/distortion.

Other amps have three channels, 1 clean and 2 overdrives (1 for a much higher gain setting. Such as the Marshall TSL series). And still others have two completely seperate stand-alone channels that you can completely customize to your liking such as the Orange AD30TC.
Gibson SG Standard
Orange Rocker 30 combo
Fulltone OCD
EH Holy Grail
#15
Quote by rockxwl
Traditionally 2 channels. 1 for clean, one for overdrive/distortion.

Other amps have three channels, 1 clean and 2 overdrives (1 for a much higher gain setting. Such as the Marshall TSL series). And still others have two completely seperate stand-alone channels that you can completely customize to your liking such as the Orange AD30TC.


Oh, of course. I feel rather stupid now, I knew what channels were, as they're labelled exactly that on my current amp. I only have 2 channels on my SS and they're both horrible. Thanks for the explanation.
Proud owner of an Engl Thunder 50 Reverb and an Ibanez S470

"The end is extremely fucking nigh..."