#1
learning intervals (major 5th, perfect 4th, etc) im trying to learn about the names of intervals (minor second major second that sort of thing), if someone could clarify it for me it would be greatly appreciated.
#3
That's the most thorough way but here's intervals for dummies

Open string to a fretted note:

0-1 - minor 2nd
0-2 - major 2nd
0-3 - minor 3rd
0-4 - major 3rd
0-5 - perfect 4th
0-6 - diminished 5th or augmented 4th
0-7 - perfect 5th
0-8 - minor 6th
0-9 - major 6th
0-10 - minor 7th
0-11 - major 7th
0-12 - (perfect) octave

^Just an easy way to think of them. But that's only after you understand the thread that bgc posted
#4
Quote by spoonfulofshred
That's the most thorough way but here's intervals for dummies

Open string to a fretted note:

0-1 - minor 2nd
0-2 - major 2nd
0-3 - minor 3rd
0-4 - major 3rd
0-5 - perfect 4th
0-6 - diminished 5th or augmented 4th Commonly called a tritone.
0-7 - perfect 5th
0-8 - minor 6th
0-9 - major 6th
0-10 - minor 7th
0-11 - major 7th
0-12 - (perfect) octave

^Just an easy way to think of them. But that's only after you understand the thread that bgc posted
I added the only thing that was missing. I'm glad someone typed this all out. I'm far too lazy.
#5
I'm not sure I understand. Do you just want the names of all the intervals?
Here's what I think you want.
(Note that the intervals can be played anywhere on any string, I'm using opens as roots strictly for example).

Perfect Unison: 0-0 (Raised Half Step is Minor 2nd)
Major 2nd: 0-2 (Lowered Half Step is Minor 2nd, Raised Half Step is Augmented 2nd)
Major Third: 0-4 (Lowered Half Step is Minor 3rd, Raised Half Step is Perfect 4th)
Perfect 4th: 0-5 (Lowered Half Step is Diminished 4th, Raised Half Step is Augmented 4th)
Perfect 5th: 0-7 ( Lowered Half Step is Dimnished 5th, Raised Half Step is Augmented 5th)
Major 6th: 0-9 (Lowered Half Step is Minor 6th, Raised Half Step is Augmented 6th)
Major 7th: 0-11 (Lowered Half Step is Minor 7th, Raised Half Step is Octave)
Perfect Octave: 0-12 (Lowered Half Step is Major 7th, Raised Half Step is Minor 9th)

Hope that helped, if it didn't, feel free to ask for more help.

EDIT: All that for nothing. Beaten to it.
#7
An easy way to remember what certain intervals sound like is to link them with songs. e.g, when thinking of how a tritone sounds that 'Ma-ri-a, just met a girl named Ma-ri-a' part of west Side Story pops up in my mind because of the tritone in 'Ma-ri-a'. Find all of these intervals in songs you know and make a mental link. It makes remembering easier.
The above user has physical deformities, which make any crude, sarcastic or offensive comments actually the fault of the threadstarter. Honest.
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#9
Note that there is no such thing as a major 5th. Also learn to invert intervals which is just substracting them from 9. So a 4th becomes a 5th (9-4), a major 3th a minor 6th and a minor 2th a major 7th etc. A tritone is exactly half an octave so it stays a tritone.