#1
i've bin playing for about ehm... well since christmas and i've gotn pretty good. the problime is i would like to start writing my own riffs and melodys and i'm not very good.

i'd like to know if there is a methode on writing riffs an melodys 'cause i'm having trouble writing them.


so any help would be appreciated.

thax
#2
hey man i'm in the same situation here, but i just play what comes up in me, not thinking about any scales or sorts, just play something, write it down (or better record it) and then play something different, but dont hammer on it too much, playing it to many times will make it seem boring and useless, just go to another riff and before you know it you got a collection of riffs...

well hope that helps, if not, sorry
#3
Return to the root a lot, think in terms of rhythms and drums, and keep it simple.
The above user has physical deformities, which make any crude, sarcastic or offensive comments actually the fault of the threadstarter. Honest.
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#4
Use the pentatonic scale. Listen to riffs you like, and figure out why you like them. Then use those elements in your riffs. And most importantly, don't scrap anything. If the riff isn't turning out right, put it on a back burner and return to it later.
#5
A big help is to think about the rhythm a lot more.. that was my problem at first. I was using different chords and scales but basic rhythms.. try concentrating on thinking up a good one then work on the chords.

In my opinion the 'catchyness' of the riff goes mainly off the rhythm. Just have a mess about with different strum patterns and gaps in riffs.. muted notes.. scratches..
#6
i would keep listening to other musicians, mainly because you really haven't been playing THAT long you're going to want to keep listening to others not only for inspiration but just ideas in general, after a while you'll prolly start listening to things you never did before and realizing musical qualities in little things you wouldn't have thought about twice in the past. i would also suggest learning lots of songs or some basic theory to help to get used to different scales and how everything fits together.
#7
The rhythm is really important indeed when you are looking for a nice riff. Because you are talking about a riff I assume you want it to be catchy and rocking and that is for a big part in syncopation. Take one note (let's take A) and play it with an accent on each downbeat in 16th notes first. Now that sound driving but not really interesting so try to throw in another accent on an upbeat (difficult at first but that's why you practise it). After some playing around and throwing in rests triplets swing rhythms etc you will come up with something catchy soon enough. Now take one or two other notes (let's take D and C because we want to be unoriginal now to keep focussed on the rhytm) and add them in your rhytm just the same way you added accents on strange places. Once you've got something cool you can remember and tap on your knees you can apply it to chords, doublestops etc. Finnisch it of with some more accenting techniques like palm muting and hitting dempened strings. Last but not least you can take rhythms from any music you hear and apply them to your own riffs no matter where they come from. You know the intro to that famous wagner piece? It's a bit like tadadaTAAtah TadadaTAAtah TadadaTAAtah Tadadadamm. Really catchy .