#1
i have alot of problems with timing, i'm a great technical player but i can't keep a rhythm i'm always shootin the gun so to speak tippers
#2
A metronome could help.
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#3
I really think you're too tense. That's the reason for a lot of timing issues. Just relax. Relax as much as you can. Let it be fluid and flow. Of course, a metronome would help. Practice at around 80 no so you can develop your speed, but so you can get the relaxed feeling. Take deep breaths, get real comfortable, light up some incense, smoke a doobie - whatever gets you loose. Don't even consider it practice, but follow the metronome. As long as you stay relaxed later on without the metronome and with another player, it'll all come back. Just don't let it slip. Rhythm guitar is A LOT harder than people give it credit for since, like the bass player, you support the lead. Lead is actually the easiest thing to do in a band since everyone else always has to be one step ahead of you. So just relax and play it with a smile. Don't forget it, but don't worry or get tense. Eventually even at 240 bpm, you can play rhythm with perfect timing.
"Chuck-E-Cheese called. They want their band back."
#4
If one more person tries to use Metallica as a good example for anything, I'll slit their ****ing throat and bury them in my contribution to sewage.
"Chuck-E-Cheese called. They want their band back."
#6
Personally I think that metronomes are kinda annoying. I just program some really simple rhythms into my drum machine and play along to those.
#7
Quote by Anghellic
Personally I think that metronomes are kinda annoying. I just program some really simple rhythms into my drum machine and play along to those.


Get used to it. It improves your playing.
"Chuck-E-Cheese called. They want their band back."
#8
Just find an easy song to play, like Back in Black, learn it pretty well, then try to play along with the song itself, it works wonders, I had the same problem, I could solo just fine (at least by my diminished standards), but I couldn't play a rhythm to save my life. Once you get the hang of it playing rhythm isn't too bad, but it is much harder than anyone gives it credit for being.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#9
Quote by God Am
If one more person tries to use Metallica as a good example for anything, I'll slit their ****ing throat and bury them in my contribution to sewage.


Rythm is the only good thing metallica actually has so stfu you goddamn horseraper.


Anyway, use a metronome or start playing with a drum computer because if your rythm sucks your drum knowlegde will suck to i think.
#10
i agree with everyone, metronome/drum machine.
if your timing problem is in like a live situation, monitors!
#11
Quote by flogrock
i agree with everyone, metronome/drum machine.
if your timing problem is in like a live situation, monitors!


in ear monitors imo are far better since i had problems with hearing the vocalist whenever i gig. but still though you should be able to play live without a monitor unless your in a hall where **** is echoey which i have done and only lost time once or twice
#12
Metronomes have their uses but I've always had problems with certain complex rythms, especially when the timing changes or when the I'm upping the tempo. Problems like playing a faster legatto part really slow to get it clean first.

Guitar pro is my metronome now. If I have a decent tab I can go from slow to fast without making the mistakes I made with the metronome.

When I can play it up to speed, turn down the guitar volume fully and play over the backing tracks. Hope that helps...
Quote by jimtaka
i'd say your guitar is out of tune, or you are accidentally muting strings that you aren't trying to, or your right hand isn't strumming at the same time that your left hand is fretting, or you could be reading the tab upside down...