#1
Ok So I saw this album at the record store the other day and it really interested me... and I wanted to get it but i didnt have the money, so i figured i would ask you guys this.

What do you all think of this album or this serious of albums based off the Martin Scorsese Blues documentary. Im really think about getting it, but Id hate to buy a flop. I also so one for SRV too.

So if you know anything, or have the record or just an opinion please let me know.

Here is a link to its description of Wiki. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Scorsese_Presents_the_Blues:_Jimi_Hendrix

Thanks for anything.
#2
Quote by Playdoh14
Ok So I saw this album at the record store the other day and it really interested me... and I wanted to get it but i didnt have the money, so i figured i would ask you guys this.

What do you all think of this album or this serious of albums based off the Martin Scorsese Blues documentary. Im really think about getting it, but Id hate to buy a flop. I also so one for SRV too.

So if you know anything, or have the record or just an opinion please let me know.

Here is a link to its description of Wiki. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Scorsese_Presents_the_Blues:_Jimi_Hendrix

Thanks for anything.


Well I haven't personally seen the film, but Martin Scorsese is the same bloke who directed (and filmed?) Bob Dylan's 'No Direction Home' which was fantastically done. I'd imagine this would be in the same vein as far as quality and depth goes, so I'd reccomend based on what I've seen of the man's abilities in film.
#4
Quote by dkaddicts
Didnt he direct the last waltz also??


Yes he did. He also did Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Casino, and Taxi Driver to name a few. I bought the 5-disc box set that Scorsese put out and I love it. It goes from Charley Patton and Blind Lemon Jefferson to all the new players.

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Don't want to be a writer with my thoughts out on the page
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#6
I have all the Scorsese blues documentaries, they're done by differen't people and Scorsese does the first one. I have a collection/mix of songs under the Scorsese blues label, I didn't know they were releasing albums in a series but I guess I'm glad they are, they have a Jimi Hendrix one?
#7
They have a bunch of artist CDs. Such as B.B. King (first blues album I ever bought), Jimi, SRV, Clapton, Robert Johnson (3rd blues album I bought), and more including that box set.

Don't want to be an actor pretending on the stage
Don't want to be a writer with my thoughts out on the page
Don't want to be a painter 'cause everyone comes to look
Don't want to be anything where my life's an open book

Phish - Waste
#8
I bought the Son House one and it is very good if that is any help. The Hendrix one looks decent. It has songs from all stages of Jimi's career.
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#9
saw a little on the hendrix documentary, and ive seem teh dylan one a couple times. scorsese is an awsome director, my favorite of all time, he makes amazing movies and hes got tons of respect for music, blues in particular. they are very well made, definately get it.
#11
I've thought about picking this album up as well. I decided there were other things that I wanted to buy, but if you pick it up, tell me how it is.

Here's a review of it I found. Maybe it'll help you make a decision.

As part of the numerous compilations issued in conjunction with the major television documentary series The Blues, this is a collection of blues-oriented Hendrix recordings. A couple of considerations conspire to make this one of Hendrix's less essential releases. First, the blues were just a part of Hendrix's musical mix, though an important one. Second, there was a previous compilation of Hendrix's blues-oriented work in 1994, simply titled Blues. There's little repetition between Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues and Blues, though, and it works as a decent grouping of some of his bluesiest recordings for those listeners who want to plunge especially deeply into one facet of his repertoire. "Red House" and "Voodoo Chile" are by far the most celebrated tracks here, but the accent is on lesser-heard performances that first came out on other archival compilations. In fact, the fine Earl King cover "Come On (Let the Good Times Roll)" (from Electric Ladyland) is the only other song that came out in Hendrix's lifetime. The other selections vary from inspired ("Hear My Train a Comin'," recorded in early 1969 with the original Jimi Hendrix Experience lineup, and a solo "Midnight Lightning") to rather routine jams, though Hendrix's imaginative virtuosity and affinity for the blues is usually evident. This being a posthumous Hendrix release, it couldn't be complete without a couple of previously unissued tracks to tempt the completists, though these aren't too exciting. Those are the 1969 outtakes "Georgia Blues," on which Hendrix is actually more like a backing musician for Lonnie Youngblood (who takes lead vocals), and "Blue Window," a nearly 13-minute outing that gives vent to his jazzier tendencies, the arrangement also featuring organ, three saxophones, and two trumpets. The liner notes about Jimi's blues record collecting habits by mid-'60s girlfriend Faye Pridgon, by the way, are pretty cool.

- Richie Unterberger
#12
thanks for that review man... and also cool collection of albums right off the bat when i saw the 13th floor elevators i was impressed.
#13
Yeah I watched all the DVD documentaries a while back, some of the stuff on those is just classic.
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