#1
Ive been getting really interested in recording lately and I will start recording soon. I need to know what else is essential or even a good luxury to have during recording, hears my setup:

Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic
Agile Les Paul *soon*
Roland Cube 30 Amp
Dell Dimension 8100 ( computer is used solely for recording )
MXL 900/901 Mic Recording Package *soon*
Line 6 Toneport Ux2
Cubase SX3

I was thinking about getting a nice set of Bose computer speakers too, good deal?
My Gear:
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Epiphone Sheraton II
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Teese RMC Picture Wah
MXR Carbon Copy
Keeley Modded TS9
Korg Pitchblack
Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic

#3
You'll need the following:
audio interface: preferably with 8 analogue inputs and outputs firewire cos USB 2.0 is well slow and poor quality
yamaha NS10 studio monitors: forget your ****ty computer speakers most albums during the 80's and 90's were mixed on these, crystal clear and toneless speakers, perfect for the studio. you'll have to find a pair on ebay though cos yam stopped production.
Stereo amp: just a stereo amp of around 70watts+
Mixing desk: must be at least a 24 channel with 8 group channels to be flexible
Sequencer program: cubase, pro tools, cakewalk ect...
Mastering program: wavelab, peak, soundforge ect...
VST plug-ins: a must in all computer based studios, google em

merry christmas thts what you need for a fully functional studio.
#5
dont get an expensive microphone. then you can tell for certian that you're playing in a bedroom as it sounds that way.
#6
Don't buy NS10m's unless you are already really used to NS10m's - not only is there no production of these speakers, but you will find prices of replacement woofers and tweaters will be going steadily up over time. Unless you know your NS10's you may well buy a pair with old and tired speaker components and end up needing instant (and expensive) replacement parts.

If you want to buy Yamaha, buy HS50M's or HS80M's (depending on the size of your studio). These are very cheap but also very nice home studio monitors. If you can afford it, try a pair of MSP5's.

There are bucket loads of monitors out there, but really the most important thing when you are on a budget is to get the best you can afford and get used to them. WHen you mix, constantly check how your tracks sound in your car stereo, on your HI FI and whatever other speakers you can get your hands on. What you will get from doing this is a picture of what your monitors are showing you, and what they are not. Once you know your monitors, and you know how to adjust your mixes for the best balance across a multitude of speaker systems, you will be ready for a decent and more expensive pair. Untill then - they won't do you any good as your ears aren't yet educated enough to take advantage of the...advantages..of...er...expensive...monitors.

it comes down to listening to music through speakers and listening to speakers through music. The former is easy, the latter quite difficult (relatively speaking).
Top 5:
1) Only The Cool Climb - Tj1
2) My Favorite Dress - ~King_Of_Foolz~
3) She Once Was My Playmate - Tj1
4) Lovers Lullaby - KOF
5) Cold Dark Room - Ditda
#7
Quote by burning_feather
You'll need the following:
audio interface: preferably with 8 analogue inputs and outputs firewire cos USB 2.0 is well slow and poor quality
yamaha NS10 studio monitors: forget your ****ty computer speakers most albums during the 80's and 90's were mixed on these, crystal clear and toneless speakers, perfect for the studio. you'll have to find a pair on ebay though cos yam stopped production.
Stereo amp: just a stereo amp of around 70watts+
Mixing desk: must be at least a 24 channel with 8 group channels to be flexible
Sequencer program: cubase, pro tools, cakewalk ect...
Mastering program: wavelab, peak, soundforge ect...
VST plug-ins: a must in all computer based studios, google em

merry christmas thts what you need for a fully functional studio.


Got a spare grand anyone?
#8
You'll need the following:

1.audio interface: preferably with 8 analogue inputs and outputs firewire cos USB 2.0 is well slow and poor quality

The Toneport acts as my audio interface

2. yamaha NS10 studio monitors: forget your ****ty computer speakers most albums during the 80's and 90's were mixed on these, crystal clear and toneless speakers, perfect for the studio. you'll have to find a pair on ebay though cos yam stopped production.

3. Stereo amp: just a stereo amp of around 70watts+

4. Mixing desk: must be at least a 24 channel with 8 group channels to be flexible

Not sure if I really need one? Can you explain this, its not like Im gonna be recording a full band, but maybe it could be a good idea if i do wanna start a band I dunno

5. Sequencer program: cubase, pro tools, cakewalk ect...

Already have Cubase as stated above

6. Mastering program: wavelab, peak, soundforge ect...

7. VST plug-ins: a must in all computer based studios, google em

I have Reason 3.0, i can DEFINENTLY use that for all my other instruments

Could you go more in depth of some of that? Im new to recording and I dont exactly have a grand to spend
My Gear:
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Epiphone Sheraton II
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Teese RMC Picture Wah
MXR Carbon Copy
Keeley Modded TS9
Korg Pitchblack
Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic

#9
You dont need a mixer unless you intend to, as you say, record an entire band.

Reason is great - worry about VST's later.

Don't bother with the mastering program at this stage, the Multiband compressor and Dynamics processing included with Cubase SX3 will be plenty of tools for now.

Infact, your gear list is already fine, why not buy it and use it. You will soon find what you need that you don't have - nobody can really tell you without knowing precisely how you will work.

The only thing I would really suggest you buy are a few books on recording and on Cubase.
Top 5:
1) Only The Cool Climb - Tj1
2) My Favorite Dress - ~King_Of_Foolz~
3) She Once Was My Playmate - Tj1
4) Lovers Lullaby - KOF
5) Cold Dark Room - Ditda
#10
ok, and i will look into monitors though
My Gear:
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Epiphone Sheraton II
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Teese RMC Picture Wah
MXR Carbon Copy
Keeley Modded TS9
Korg Pitchblack
Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic

#11
KRK makes some really nice monitors.... look into them. The Rokit 8's are cheaper and sound almost as nice as the V8II's. They run a very close second to them. The user ratings are higher on the Rokit's, but the V8II's do sound a bit better, but cost a bit more.

http://www.krksys.com/new_site/index_start.asp

http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_krk_rp8_rokit_powered_8_reference_studio_monitor?full_sku=102516176

http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_krk_v8ii_v_series_2_powered_nearfield_monitor?full_sku=102645082
#12
would i need 2 monitors? for like panning and stuff
My Gear:
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Epiphone Sheraton II
Fender Blues Deluxe Reissue
Teese RMC Picture Wah
MXR Carbon Copy
Keeley Modded TS9
Korg Pitchblack
Schecter Omen 6
Dean Performer Acoustic

#13
I just use the direct out on anything electronic, any microphone through a cheap Behringer mixer, all through an instrument cable with a 1/4" to headphone adapter into my cheapass sound card's mic port. Record with Audacity. Works fine with me, and there are ways around the latency.
#14
ok sorry about my "expensive" option but iv'e prepared a cheaper option for a "multi-million" sound on a tight budget.

Interface: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=69049

Desk: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=70282
(despite what others have said in this thread, a mixing desk is a essential to keep the signal balanced i.e. faders, gain pots, tape returns.... and for flexibilty for when you want to later expand your studio)

Mic's: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=1501
http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=1513

Amp: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=8723

Monitors: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=2489
i would normally say get some NS10's locally or ebay, check for rips, stresses and bumps in the speaker cones and check the coils are in alignment with the magnets.
#15
burning_feather....

is this a joke?

he's already said hes got an interface, mics, and instrument.

Quote by burning feather
Mixing desk: must be at least a 24 channel with 8 group channels to be flexible


uhhhhhhh no. simply no. he doesnt even really need a mixer at all for what hes asking. and a 24/8? ya right.

and where the hell did those yamaha's come from. MF has had m-audio monitors starting at 100 dollars for months. start there.

stop copying and pasting suggestions into situations that ar completely unsuitable. everybody's needs vary.

Adam
Quote by ollie_12318
my grandma is dying and my mum wants me to play something on bass for her, any body got any suggestions?!

Quote by splinter26
another one bites the dust has a pretty cool bass line
#16
Quote by burning feather
Desk: http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=70282
(despite what others have said in this thread, a mixing desk is a essential to keep the signal balanced i.e. faders, gain pots, tape returns.... and for flexibilty for when you want to later expand your studio)



mix on the computer? duh?

Adam
Quote by ollie_12318
my grandma is dying and my mum wants me to play something on bass for her, any body got any suggestions?!

Quote by splinter26
another one bites the dust has a pretty cool bass line
#17
sigh adam, yet again
firstly the reason i suggested a interface is because his Line 6 toneport is made specifically for recording guitar. a cheap £55 firewire interface does wonders on recording all kinds of instruments.

You can pick-up yamaha NS-10's for around £100-£150 on ebay and trust me here, every person in the industry iv'e worked with has them and would recommend them for project studios and even top record label multi million mastering facillities.

I suggested some more mic's because he only has one, and these mics i have used myself and would use them over some of the £1500 neumans iv'e used


The mixing desk is vital for expanding studio equipment, mainly outboard gear, with compressors and effects processors in cheap rack forms on the market its a vital component to have, also you must always balance your signal through a desk as its going through to the audio interface for a reliable sound quality, to protect your interface from high voltage spikes (accidents happen, cost me my first digidesign 002), reliably monitor your signal, real-time EQ and faders with out the extra expense of money and processing power diverted towards VST's. And with some consoles costing less than £50 these days, its definetly worth having.
Last edited by burning_feather at Aug 8, 2006,
#18
Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
would i need 2 monitors? for like panning and stuff

Its for more than just panning. You might want to make actual stereo recordings. Some soundcards and mixing/mastering programs will allow you to go up to AC3 (Dolby 5.1) or 6.1 or even 7.1... some will allow DTS (Even the newer DTS-EX) which out of the ones I've mentioned, DTS (and DTS-EX) are unbelievable in sheer audio reproduction... but it is a hard drive hog.

A 4 minute song (in DTS) will use approximately 400 megs... give or take. At that point, you had better have one hell of a computer and your hard drives need a large buffer, high rotational speeds and a fast transfer rate. Such as SCSI running at 10,000 RPM, at least a 10MB buffer with a 2ms transfer rate. Some SATA IDE drives will do it (or come close), but older ATA's and Ultra ATA's can't take it.
#19
Quote by Bill43
Its for more than just panning. You might want to make actual stereo recordings. Some soundcards and mixing/mastering programs will allow you to go up to AC3 (Dolby 5.1) or 6.1 or even 7.1... some will allow DTS (Even the newer DTS-EX) which out of the ones I've mentioned, DTS (and DTS-EX) are unbelievable in sheer audio reproduction... but it is a hard drive hog.

A 4 minute song (in DTS) will use approximately 400 megs... give or take. At that point, you had better have one hell of a computer and your hard drives need a large buffer, high rotaitonal speeds and a fast transfer rate. Such as SCSI running at 10,000 RPM, at least a 10MB buffer with a 2ms transfer rate. Some SATA IDE drives will do it (or come close), but older ATA's and Ultra ATA's can't take it.



I don't think he's ready for DTS Encoding mate lol. But a pair of monitors is standard in everything to do with recording, and has been since well, (guessing here) late 50's.
They create a stereo image, and you can use this to your advantage to make stereo effects. e.g. stereo modulation. Afterall you won't be able to buy a monitor by itself anyway, always in pairs.
Last edited by burning_feather at Aug 8, 2006,
#20
Do you have to buy a seperate recording program? I always thought the TonePort UX2 came with recording software. I was planning on getting it, do I have to spend an extra $400?
T3h Reddest member of the Socialist Club


Gibson SG Special (Faded Brown)
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