#2
I would, but I don't feel like punching out 7 pages of explanation. Try looking for a book called Eyewitness COmpanions: Guitar by Richard Chapman, has a section explaining modes and how to use them better than I've seen anywhere else.
#3
I highly doubt it would be a 7 page explanation. How do they relate to scales? What are some basic modes?
#4
Quote by Morgan_the_Homo
I highly doubt it would be a 7 page explanation. How do they relate to scales? What are some basic modes?



heh, it actually would require around that many pages

they're pretty complicated....well...the concept of it all is
Nicks and dents are battle scars...they give a guitar history.


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#5
Hmm their not that complicated. You just need to know the basics....

Alright, so I have almost no social life so I've decided to dedicate my life to Drawing with a pencil and Music. So I'll try my best to explain......

Modes (or Church Modes) date back to the times of Gregorian chant... (from what I know) and they are just another whole set of 7 new scales.


They are as follows:

Aeolian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between A to A. This is mode is just another name for a natural minor scale.)

Locrian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between B to B.)

Ionian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between C to C. This one mode is just another name for a major scale.)

Dorian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between D to D.)

Phrygian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between E to E.)

Lydian Mode (or the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between F to F.)

Mixolydian mode (or the pattern of semitones and wholes tones if you play all the white keys on a piano/keyboard between G to G.)

That's basically it.

So, for example.....

Lets say you want to know what the C Phrygian scale.

You would take the pattern of semitones and whole tones if you paly all the white keys on a keyboard between E to E.

That would mean a Natural minor scale with a Flat 2nd. So it would be as follows....

C Dflat Eflat F G Aflat Bflat C

If you need more help, then just post so...