#1
how do you learn to incorporate speed into your solos? i mean, when i play something slow i can make it sound good, but when i try and play faster it doesnt sound right.

~timepheonix
#2
practice...start slow. seperate it into seperate parts. master one part slow. then slowly play faster. then move onto the next part. master it slow, then slowly play it faster. then, play the two parts together slow, and then fast. it works for me. and it will take time. but it works
#3
Quote by sfsknight07
practice...start slow. seperate it into seperate parts. master one part slow. then slowly play faster. then move onto the next part. master it slow, then slowly play it faster. then, play the two parts together slow, and then fast. it works for me. and it will take time. but it works

And use a metronome. Nothing sounds worse than an off-beat shred solo.

There's a book, "Speed mechanics for lead guitar" by I forget who, but it helps on speed and practice techniques.
#4
well i dont have a problem with speed, and i pretty much use a metronome all the time. i was thinking about getting that book, but i didnt know if it was any good or not.

~timepheonix
#5
Quote by TimePheonix
how do you learn to incorporate speed into your solos? i mean, when i play something slow i can make it sound good, but when i try and play faster it doesnt sound right.

~timepheonix

If it doesn't sound right, maybe you aren't hitting the notes cleanly?

Clean>Dirty Speed

If you mean constructing solos so that you can use your speed, you should try varying the speed of your notes. So one part of the solo, play slowly, then a short speed burst.
#7
Get some better harmonic ideas.
primusfan
It's better with no teeth, trust me. Much fewer scars on my penis now that I've switched from seniors in high school to senior citizens.
#8
^The books by Troy Stetina just incase anyone needed to know.
Seinfeld
The Gear:
Fender John Mayer Sig. Strat
Hughes & Kettner Edition Blue 60
Dunlop Crybaby
Ibanez Tubescreamer
Damn right, I've got the blues.
#9
U prolly lack accuracy

without it, playing fast is worthless. If it "doesn't sound right fast, but is ok slow" then that's most likely the problem.

Accuracy isn't just the right fretting: picking is essential as well. U'd surprised how most people have poor picking technique (much like myself)
Basically, the theory behind this is that when most people start using a pick, they learn to use it in a sense that's similar to when u learn how to write: the lettering & writing utensil-holding technique is always slightly askew; therefore flawed. So to, is this true for picking.
(I learned this from guitarone magazine a few years back)

Playing with just a metronome won't get you to play faster, it'll just help u keep time. When practicing slow, u should stay in tune with ur picking technique as well as the timing, and then apply it to faster tempos...
#10
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
If it doesn't sound right, maybe you aren't hitting the notes cleanly?

Clean>Dirty Speed

If you mean constructing solos so that you can use your speed, you should try varying the speed of your notes. So one part of the solo, play slowly, then a short speed burst.


I love doing that. It just makes me feel like Jimmy Page.

Oh if its speed your after, practice solos slow, then speed it slowly up as you get better at hitting the right notes. That's what I'm doing. You'll be soloing like Page, no not Page...You'll be soloing like Jack White in no time
Last edited by gamayshark at Aug 6, 2006,