#1
I was wondering if you primarily play on the elctric guitar, but practice every once in a while on the acoustic, would it make you better on the electric? Because the action is higher, and the string are harder to press down on the acoustic. Thanks for any input?
#2
The way i see it, no. imo acoustic and electric are two different instruments. I pay electric well but cannot ajust myself to acoustic. This is just my opinion
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#4
Of course. It would help in the same way that playing piano would help your guitar playing.

Any extra instruments you play will enhance your musical horizons and make you an all round better player.

I recently started playing a lot of jazz on the piano and i have no doubt it's improved my improv ability on the guitar massively
#5
i think it does help. you cant solo the same way you can on electric. you have to think about things more and you usually have to slow down. i find it helped with using the entire neck more than just one box. because you cant bend as well as you can on electric, it forces you to move around more.

so things like that. because you have to play differently, it should improve your all around playing. and of course it will keep your fingers strong.
#6
Playing acoustic.. in my opinion.. gives you more dexterity and speed when you switch over to the electric guitar.

Plus, playing acoustically every once in a while is a good way to broaden your musical taste.
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#7
It's always nice to play on acoustic to strengthen your fingers and even just to warm you up, but they do have many different qualities.
#8
They're different.

I went from playing acoustic primarily to playing electric and there was a period where I accidentally was bending every string because I wasn't used to how delicate an electric can be, whereas a lot of electric players switch to acoustic and can't play a chord without getting really bad fret buzz.

I think a player who can play both is better than one who can only play one or the other. But I don't think players who play acoustic are necessarily better than those who play electric, it's just a different style.

However I feel that playing acoustically can give you a good sense of the song's energy, because it's just you and a guitar and there isn't anything else to mask it.
#9
I think you might be able to play slightly faster, but not really that noticeable.
#10
Personally, I think it's a myth...

Although it requires more strength to play with bronze-wound strings than nickel-wound strings, the difference isn't that noticeable

Basically, string gauges are the key here

If u play with say, 10 gauge acoustics & 8 gauge electrics, than there will be a difference...
Playing with thicker electric gauges can surely balance that out.


On a serious level, playing acoustic & electric is more for getting a broader sound and learning to play a "different" instrument, since both are played in different contexts. If u wanna learn to play acoustic for the sake of playing acoustic, then go fer it. If ur hoping to "get better on electric", don't bother: in the end it'll just prove to be a waste of money
#11
Quote by Shreddin 4 Life
Personally, I think it's a myth...

Although it requires more strength to play with bronze-wound strings than nickel-wound strings, the difference isn't that noticeable

Basically, string gauges are the key here

If u play with say, 10 gauge acoustics & 8 gauge electrics, than there will be a difference...
Playing with thicker electric gauges can surely balance that out.


On a serious level, playing acoustic & electric is more for getting a broader sound and learning to play a "different" instrument, since both are played in different contexts. If u wanna learn to play acoustic for the sake of playing acoustic, then go fer it. If ur hoping to "get better on electric", don't bother: in the end it'll just prove to be a waste of money


lets not forget they are both guitars! and are not completely different instruments!! I practice songs from hendrix, clapton, zeppelin on acoustic and they were all orignaly played on electric. the chords on the guitars are the same, the scales, the notes! and I think learning on an acoustic does make you better at electric as far as strength and dexteriety are concerned! you can transfer what you learn on acoustic to electric.and if you can make a riff or lick sound good on acoustic its sure as hell gonna sound killer on a electric.
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#12
Look anything u can play on acoustic u could play on a electric. they are both string instuments that u fret and are pretty much the same except the acoustic is harder just a bit
...
#13
Play your electric, and when you feel like every once in a while, pull out your acoustic. It does the soul good.

Does anybody else have serious problem playing bar chords on the acoustic? I do fine on the electric, but on the acoustic bar chords just kick my ass after a while. I have brass strings, but they are light gauge, but they still hurt like after playing for like two minute.
#14
Quote by Mr.Loomis_shred
The way i see it, no. imo acoustic and electric are two different instruments. I pay electric well but cannot ajust myself to acoustic. This is just my opinion


Exactly his point so why are you saying no?

In my opinion it does help. My practice guitar has 13's or 14's on it depending on how I feel sometimes and has a pretty mean action. I play as much as a I can on that, but of course some frets are unreachable. I find it especially useful in difficult chord fingerings that once nailed on the acoustic pay off 10x on the electric.

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#15
just don't get into the habit of playing the acoustic more than the electric if you plan on playing electric for the most part. i have both guitars and started playing my acoustic more than my electric for a couple months and found that i would start losing a bit of my electric skill such as scrapes and palm muting because i didn't play that on my acoustic.
#16
Quote by gamayshark
Play your electric, and when you feel like every once in a while, pull out your acoustic. It does the soul good.

Does anybody else have serious problem playing bar chords on the acoustic? I do fine on the electric, but on the acoustic bar chords just kick my ass after a while. I have brass strings, but they are light gauge, but they still hurt like after playing for like two minute.


yeah i can barre stuff fine, with practice you need to wrap your finger around it properly and hold really stiff, but the cheaper guitars are a lot harder than a more expensive one which is more precise and accurate!
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#17
Quote by Amped
just don't get into the habit of playing the acoustic more than the electric if you plan on playing electric for the most part. i have both guitars and started playing my acoustic more than my electric for a couple months and found that i would start losing a bit of my electric skill such as scrapes and palm muting because i didn't play that on my acoustic.


this is very true...

if u go and buy a new acoustic, u'll be more motivated to play it for a while simply because it's newer & all. Therefore u might end up "losing" some of ur electric skill because for a while, after getting used to the new acoustic neck (often w/ higher action--but not always), going back to the electric will prolly feel odd...
#18
actually i would disagree, you can do everything on an acoustic that you can on an electric, i used to have an acoustic that had the exact same action as my electric (aside from sounding good that was the other big quality i was looking for when i purchased it) and i had no problem doing solo's or other electric type stuff, in fact it helped my electric playing immensely.
#19
i cant say if it will make you better at electric, but there are alot of things to play that just sound better on acoustic. i played acoustic for almost a year and a half before i ever even touched an electric guitar.
#20
Myth. It's string thickness and action that dictate how hard acoustics are to play. I've played acoustics that were harder and easier to play than my electric ( with 9's and low action ). If I had an acoustic I'd put 10's on it ( thinest you get for acoustic I hear ) and have a low action.

More finger strength helps but if you don't need it for electric and that's your primary instrument then it's just excess strength.
#21
I have more fun with acoustic, sounds better really.. or unplugged electric, perhaps because the amps I play through are ****e -- No wall of sound or anything.
#22
acoustic is a bit harder in my opinion but all in all they are the same. it will be easier to switch from acoustic to electric
#23
Quote by Sir Edwin CBE
Myth. It's string thickness and action that dictate how hard acoustics are to play. I've played acoustics that were harder and easier to play than my electric ( with 9's and low action ). If I had an acoustic I'd put 10's on it ( thinest you get for acoustic I hear ) and have a low action.

More finger strength helps but if you don't need it for electric and that's your primary instrument then it's just excess strength.


but you do need it for electric, which i found out the hard way when diving into legato...serious strength is needed to play trills and legato runs quickly without cramping up after a while...i find it great to practice legato on acoustic; if you can make it sound crisp and clear on acoustic, it'll be damn easy on electric

barre chords aren't very hard on electric in my opinion, so practicing chords on acoustic doesn't make a difference to me, but it is much more difficult
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#24
^ Practice legato on electric - acoustic just gives you more strength than needed.

I'm basically saying that it's like working out and having a huge muscle capacity. It's a good thing to have - no question. But it's only useful if you're going to use it. I wouldn't say that it warrants buying a second guitar. Acoustics build muscle and strength more as it needs more, if you want a different sound then get one - otherwise exercises on electric will suffice.
#25
there's no such thing as too much strength, especially for legato...players usually think "i have more than enough strength" until they attempt a complicated lick with plenty of legato and complex position shifts...that's just my opinion, you can practice legato on whatever you like
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#27
No offense intended here, but what the hell's wrong with you guys?!?!

The key to legato is accuracy & effortlessness, not strength & brutality

obviously there is a certain amount of strength required to play legato & all, but if legato is hammering the strings with as much strength as possible to u, then ur doing it wrong...

However, I do agree that playing acoustic will make u stronger (if u get bronze strings). But at the same time, plating acoustic for a bit, and then switching to electric only creates the illusion that you're playing faster, once u get used to the strings on the electric again, that "increased speed/technique" will disappear! U'll just end up re-adjusting to the electric strings within an hour or so.

I used to believe in that theory too, but in time u'll realize that it makes no permanent difference really...
#28
lets look at it this way:

both are essentially the same instrument. same number of strings, same tuning, same configuration of notes. however, the average acoustic guitar is bit harder to play properly with regards to finger strength. sometimes it's because the strings are really thick, sometimes, the action is higher, sometimes the neck is thicker... it doesn't matter.

the point is that not only does play acoutsically give you a different perspective on the same riffs, it will strengthen your fingers if it's harder to play. simple exercise.
#29
Quote by frigginjerk
lets look at it this way:

both are essentially the same instrument. same number of strings, same tuning, same configuration of notes. however, the average acoustic guitar is bit harder to play properly with regards to finger strength. sometimes it's because the strings are really thick, sometimes, the action is higher, sometimes the neck is thicker... it doesn't matter.

the point is that not only does play acoutsically give you a different perspective on the same riffs, it will strengthen your fingers if it's harder to play. simple exercise.


yup that's prolly the best way to describe it
excercise & "strengthening" (depending on the guitar)

although I don't necessarily tune my acoustics the same as my electrics...
#30
Sometimes playing on acoustic or another guitar, or even playing sitting, laying, looking at it a different way, listenign a different way can help in writing original material if you're stuck in a rutt.

For that I like the acoustic, because an alright riff on acoustic can sound awesome as all hell on electric. and vice versa..so I suppose it adds a bit of fun.
#31
well, i play better the leads on electric, but for hard chords, i always use my acoustic
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#32
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No offense intended here, but what the hell's wrong with you guys?!?!

The key to legato is accuracy & effortlessness, not strength & brutality

obviously there is a certain amount of strength required to play legato & all, but if legato is hammering the strings with as much strength as possible to u, then ur doing it wrong...

However, I do agree that playing acoustic will make u stronger (if u get bronze strings). But at the same time, plating acoustic for a bit, and then switching to electric only creates the illusion that you're playing faster, once u get used to the strings on the electric again, that "increased speed/technique" will disappear! U'll just end up re-adjusting to the electric strings within an hour or so.

I used to believe in that theory too, but in time u'll realize that it makes no permanent difference really...


try playing a repeating trill pattern on all 6 strings while achieving a clean, clear, and even sound throughout all of them without hand and finger strength - not too sure about that one
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#33
Quote by axe_grinder247
try playing a repeating trill pattern on all 6 strings while achieving a clean, clear, and even sound throughout all of them without hand and finger strength - not too sure about that one


that's what general practice is for isn't it
after all, I don't feel like I have to worry about it. I play acoustic (bronze & nylon strings) & electric all the time in a random fashion & have been doing so for a few years now

although, I'm pretty sure that fits more into the "endurance" category than "strength"...
#34
Quote by Shreddin 4 Life
that's what general practice is for isn't it
after all, I don't feel like I have to worry about it. I play acoustic (bronze & nylon strings) & electric all the time in a random fashion & have been doing so for a few years now

although, I'm pretty sure that fits more into the "endurance" category than "strength"...


fair enough, that's what i was going for, since strength and endurance do in a sense go hand in hand

for me, playing legato on acoustic develops callouses much faster than electric, which is great since i prefer to bend a lot when soloing on electric, and it can hurt sometimes
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#35
Quote by axe_grinder247
fair enough, that's what i was going for, since strength and endurance do in a sense go hand in hand

for me, playing legato on acoustic develops callouses much faster than electric, which is great since i prefer to bend a lot when soloing on electric, and it can hurt sometimes


#36
maybe trying to get good at licks on acoustic so you will be stronger on electric will just cause more pain and lead to RSD quicker than just gaining the muscle memory on an electric. my two cents, (dont yell at me)
#37
i think it does in my opinion. any song i play that is fast i first practice it on the acoustic until i can't play it any faster. then start playing it on the electric
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#38
I think some of you guys are missing the point.

When you learn things on acoustic, you're forced to pretty much learn the right technique so, say chords will ring out right if at all. On electric you can get by with some of the minor mistakes which will hinder you later on.

I think learning things on acoustic makes them much easier to transition to the electric playing instead of the other way around.

PS- You can palm mute on an acoustic, and no one said acoustic electric playing wasn't allowed :-)
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