#1
Is it necessary to make sure your fretting fingers don't touch other strings? I don't think it matters since you are only hitting one string at a time and it won't matter if other fingers are touching other strings as long as the note is sounding clear.

Or will this just mess up and develop a bad habit ? If I try and make sure I don't touch other strings I would slow down to like...10% of actual speed lol.

Side note... my fingers tend to slide down and miss the strings to hit the right notes if I try to go faster than I can (and obviously my fingers would touch other strings).
#2
you should practice only hitting one string. Later on, when doing double stops and what not, or hitting multiple strings, you dont want your fingers muting the other strings. Speed should NOT come first, accuracy should be first. Speed will come eventually, but accuracy is much more important.
#3
if your playing with distortion its good to mute other strings so youll get less noise and feedback on your amp
#4
Depends, if your only playing one string it's ok... you'll need to do that to make sure there's no noise from the other string when plugged in. BUt you will also need to be able to not touch the other strings for other techniques so just keep that in mind....
#5
Quote by vanceboy
you should practice only hitting one string. Later on, when doing double stops and what not, or hitting multiple strings, you dont want your fingers muting the other strings. Speed should NOT come first, accuracy should be first. Speed will come eventually, but accuracy is much more important.


agreed.
Fender American Deluxe Ash Stratocaster (2000)
Fender Classic Player 60's Stratocaster
Marshall JCM900 100w head & 4x12 cab

Korg DT-10 Tuner; Boss DD-3 Digital Delay; Jim Dunlop JH-1B Wah; Boss RT-20 Rotary Ensemble; MXR EVH Phase 90.
#6
Okay, cool thanks but another question, regarding the metronome.

Do I play a note after the beep ? or do I try to mute out the beep by playing the note at the exact same time the metronome makes the noise ?
#7
Whole note=1 note for every 4 beats
Half note=1 note for every 2 beats
Quarter note=1 note for every beat
Eighth note=2 notes for every beat
Sixteenth note=4 notes for every beat

Play the notes on the beep if you're playing whole, half, or quarter notes, but if you're playing eighth notes you play 2 notes per beep but evenly space them out. For example, eighth notes at 60 bpm is the same speed as playing quarter notes at 120 bpm. Hopefully that wasn't too hard to understand.