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#1
LIke above, what single thing such as an exercise you did, technique you worked on, etc. that you did you did to improve you guitar playing the most?
#2
just the basic 1-2-3-4 down the fretboard, it has increased my tempo from 115 to 180 in like a few weeks.
#5
prolly working on bends and virbrato while bending.

other than that, just sitting and playing my guitar whenever i could really helped improve my playing. i just would sit there and play and try to figure things out. things that sound good, things i had in my head just working on my own style. thats what really brought me to where i am now.

and besides that, the other most important thing would be me switching to using picks. helped a lot with my playing speed and accuracy wise.
#7
learning how to practice. metronomes are essential, as are fingering exercises and picking exercises. simply put, the more you know the basics of playing, and the better you are at them, the easier it is to work on your own ideas.
#8
Finishing school for the summer and finishing exams...roll on 10week post exam summer with 4 hours per day guitar practice
#9
Quote by doive
Finishing school for the summer and finishing exams...roll on 10week post exam summer with 4 hours per day guitar practice




Same here
#10
Finally having found the fun in the guitar, instead of desperately trying to maximize my speed. The playing doesn't sound so 'run'-ish anymore
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#11
Learning to Slap.
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#13
Just practicing a lot. Rasing my strap (as was said) and playing songs that I could, slowly improving and learning newer, harder songs. Playing a few different genres helps, different techniques involved in blues than metal.

Also, learning at least basic theory. Penetonic (sp?) scale, form 1 and form 2 barre chords, very basic things. It goes a long way.
#14
Jamming with my dad (he plays keyboards) it taught me a lot more chords and help with my note selection in lead breaks ands my bending accuracy
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#15
Personally, most my improvement came when I started getting around other musicians, or aside from that, having a loop pedal, they allow for one guitarist to play as two, so you can really learn a lot of things with them.
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#17
Learning Pinch Harmonics and Vibrato
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#18
probably the thing that helped me most was to start recording myself. first of all, its hard to really listen to yourself while playing. when you listen to a recorded version of your playing, you can much more easily pick out your mistakes and really know exactly where you need to work. i could then go correct those things and know what to focus on. the next thing recording allowed me to do was play along with myself. i could make a backing and practice improvising over it, or even just play something ive written over it. it helps to play along with something like that to give the feel of playing with someone else, like staying in time and actually listening to whats going on with the music behind you. i know you wanted more of a technique thing, but i cant think of one specific technique that helped me as much as recording.
#20
Learnign to actually practice and not just play so much.
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#21
Quote by VanHendrix_
just the basic 1-2-3-4 down the fretboard, it has increased my tempo from 115 to 180 in like a few weeks.


how does that help you? when are you ever gonna play chromatic stuff like that? instead play through the positions of the modes, cause they require stretches and stuff like that. if i did chromaticism i can hit like 230+ playing 16th notes. but im only at 200bpm playing 16th notes when i play through the modes. pentatonic is just like playing chromatic stuff, only you dont hit every note.

anyways thats what i did, and it has helped my speed alot. that and in this one issue of guitarone they had "100 chop building exercises" which were really good, and worked on every single aspect of technical stuff and gave you a suggested metronome tempo setting.

~timepheonix
#22
Quote by Johnljones7443
Learning how to practice.


stole my answer
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#24
Quote by jof1029
probably the thing that helped me most was to start recording myself. first of all, its hard to really listen to yourself while playing. when you listen to a recorded version of your playing, you can much more easily pick out your mistakes and really know exactly where you need to work. i could then go correct those things and know what to focus on. the next thing recording allowed me to do was play along with myself. i could make a backing and practice improvising over it, or even just play something ive written over it. it helps to play along with something like that to give the feel of playing with someone else, like staying in time and actually listening to whats going on with the music behind you. i know you wanted more of a technique thing, but i cant think of one specific technique that helped me as much as recording.



And learning to practice correctly.
#27
mine was probably all the LSD and ecstacy...... seriously.... can't say why but it really helped with every aspect of my playing, not recommended for everyone but it helped me....
#28
Learining barre chords helped me a lot. It enabled me to learn harder songs and to learn the notes on the fret board. It also helped my creativity.
#29
The way i did it is i tryed to learn a song which was way over my head. The first time i almost always failed but i kept trying and the next day i came back and got a little better at it until i got it.
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#31
metronome helps, but when i dont have one - i tap my feet......learning new songs is great too....
#33
Finding out what style I really wanted to play and practicing that more than anything else. For me it was metal riffing with lots of emphasis on my pick hand so that's what I practice the most. Soloing is not that really a big of a deal for me so I don't really go over scales that much.
Read my post. Not this.
#34
I ususally just play scales forward, backward, left, right, up, down and any other direction I can think of. I made several excercises to work on parts of my playing I suck at too. I usually practice for at least two hours a day, if not more. Best thing you can possibly do is practice all the time forever.
#35
It's been said over and over, but correct practicing, as well as focus. I made very little progress for two years while I just played little crappy blues-rock solos, and ignored/dismissed material that I couldn't pick up within a half hour.

Then, I found the music for Sails of Charon, and I actually sat down and spent the time with a metronome bringing it up to speed. I thought, wow, this really pays off....


The other thing, which happened more recently, is recording myself, as jof brought up. I find so many little flaws that can be removed after I've recorded myself.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#36
Music Theory helped alot, but more recently, working on alternate picking with a metronome. And you'll use it with every kind of scale or mode, so your fingers'll get used to it. I don't think about scales anymore. I just see patterns that repeat 2 strings over and 2 frets up!

As a side note to this whole thing, I've been trying to get the opening of Yngwie's Trilogy Suite op.3 down for years!! And thanks to my practicing, I'm still not there yet!!

But seriously, I've almost got it down now. Just a few more weeks.

I have yet to attempt any of Petrucci's stuff. His picking is beyond god-like status!!
Last edited by axe_2_grind at Aug 9, 2006,
#37
I think the thing that helped me the most was playing something rediculously complicated and then moving up or down 1 or 2 frets and trying to duplicate the whole thing without messing it up.
#39
I was put in my place by several guitarists far better than myself. That experience did more to improve my playing than anything.
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#40
Raising strap. Dedicated practice time WITH metronome.

Put all this into playing with other musicians (very important). Its better if they are more experienced than you, dont worry if cant find them.
I learned what took me weeks or even months, just playing a few jams with other musicians.
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