#1
Ok, so I'm getting a computer (iMac), I'm getting the recording software (Logic) and I'm getting an audio interface.

So basically I've got the rudiments to record onto my computer, but I'm not sure which route I want to go as to how to do the actual recording. So far I've accertained that there are 3 ways of recording:

1) Mic up your amp, simple. Amp -> Mic -> Audio Interface -> Computer. No explanation needed here.

2) Use tone modelling software, such as Guitar Rig 2 or Amplitube. This would give much more versatility in tones than my amp, as obviously I've not got the selection of amps/effects this software could give, would also save me money on condenser mics. Guitar -> Interface -> Computer + software.

3) Use a pre-amp modeller, such as a Behringer V-amp or a Line6 pod. Again, this gives me more versatility etc. Guitar -> Pre-amp -> Interface -> Computer.

So I've got this choice, but I don't know which one to take. How do you lot record? Bear in mind I am looking for a very good recording set up, I've forked out enough money for the computer and software, and I know my stuff with programmes and computers. And guitars for that matter.

What are the ups and downs to each recording set up? Is there some advantage to the software over the modeller? Or vice versa. I'm completely open to any of these choices, I'm just wondering which would be best.

Let me know what you think guys Thanks for any help in advance.
-Tommmo
#2
#3, but I would opt for a higher end interface with at least S/PDIF and the same from the soundcard. If you can get an optical interface on both, then you can really get some great recordings.

I've also noticed that you didn't mention anything about vocals. You're not ever going to sing... or need a mic for anything?
#3
Perosonaly I havnt tryed recording on pc but I know that number 1 is a bad idea if your trying to get a good recording. Because the levels keep changing it will screw with your mic and it will sound loud and quite in the wrong places, if that makes sence. Im pretty sure that you can get some adapter to connect from your guitar to the line in input on your pc, have a lil look around. They are around £40 last time I saw them and they would give a great sound and a seperate audio track to record with.
#4
Quote by Bill43
#3, but I would opt for a higher end interface with at least S/PDIF and the same from the soundcard. If you can get an optical interface on both, then you can really get some great recordings.

I've also noticed that you didn't mention anything about vocals. You're not ever going to sing... or need a mic for anything?

Yup, I am going to be singing... but I assumed the recording for that would be much simpler. I've got my eye on a good stand and pop shield, and am probably going to stick to a sturdy SM58, but whilst I'm here I might as well ask what mics are best for recording?

And you are going to have to explain to me your first sentence... I'm not sure what S/PDIF is, and to be honest I don't know much about the soundcard on the mac, its the new all in one iMac, the 17" version.

The interface I'm using if it helps is this. Thats not the website I ordered it from, just the first to come up on google.
#5
S/PDIF is an acronym for Sony/Phillips Digital Interface. It was a "team effort" between Sony and Phillips. It records digitally and you get a true recording of your guitar, instruments or whatever. Lightpipe, (ADAT) or what is known as an optical interface digitally records your signal(s) and sends them through fiber optics, with which you can record at a higher bitrate (better sounds), but S/PDIF will do just fine. Its digital interface records up to 24bit/96kHz, where the lightpipe will go to 24bit/192kHz... which would match actual studio recordings.

Hmmm... I'm not too familiar with Macs, although I do know that the vast majority of serious recording musicians and studios prefer them. Personally I use a PC for my own. If you want to hear what a true digital recording can sound like, just click the link in my sig and every single song there was done digitally... including any vocals (only on Gravy95)... as my singing isn't that good.

Look into the soundcards offered for Macs and see what they have for ins and outs. Look for S/PDIF or above and you'll be a happy camper!
#6
Yup, the interface I have purchased has S/PDIF. 24-bit/96kHz. I did ask around for a lot of good advice before buying it, and it was recommended to me by a few people - so I knew it was gonna be good enough.

So which would you recommend... going for some software, something like Amplitube or Guitar Rig 2... or going the external pre-amp route? Getting someting like a V-Amp or a Pod? Any thoughts on that... I know you personally use a modeller, but what do you think of software based tone control?
#7
it depends on how good your normal amp sounds, naturally if you really love your tone, you want to capture it as faithfully as possible and mic it up.

if your tone isn't that hot, or perhaps you're on a budget and can't afford a great amp, modelling might be the way to go

modelling might be a little less time consuming to optimize in the long run but obviously there's nothing as good as the real thing

some of my clips, single mic in front of amp, straight into the computer:

www.myspace.com/jameschinstudio
#8
I've got a very good amp, a 3 channel Randall RM100 head with top line Randall cab... but for some reason I'm just not really an amp nut... I'm much more interested in finding out about the other ways of recording first - because I can always fall back on mic'ing up my amp if I don't like them.
#9
I like my Digitech GNX3... even though they have newer models out now.

With it I can closely emulate numerous amps, cabs, pickups, acoustics.... anything you can think of is entirely editable and you can save them as well. They even have downloadable presets that you can load on the fly through MIDI I/O, plus it has an S/PDIF out for true noiseless recording.

Look into it.

The Boss lineup doesn't record as well as the Digitech. I know... I've tried them.

There's also the Korg AX3000G that you might want to look into. It also sports a S/PDIF out and sounds pretty damned good, but I prefer the Digitech myself.

There's a lot of Boss fan's out there... but the Boss products sound better when used live. Their recording capabilities are sub-par to the Digitech.

Software based modellers are crap. The sounds they produce are garbage when compared to most decent modellers... although if I had to choose any of them, it would be Amplitube hands down.
#10
Hmm, I never really thought of the pedal boards. For some reason I was thinking purely of things like the line6. Thats a good idea, I'll look into the boards. I've had good experiences with Korg before in the past, and I've never been too much of a Boss fan. And Digitech have never let me down either.

The Vox Tonelab SE has always been something I've wanted to try out - you know anything about that?

I take it from your responses you don't know much about software based tone-modelling... but anything you might know would be helpful
#11
The Tonelab is very nice for live playing, but the I/O is all analog which would degrade your signal path (the sound) to your computer. Great for live playing, but not too good for recording.

The Korg has some neat features and some phat sounds, but the Digitech still beats it IMO.

If I were you... take a trip to your local store and have them set whatever up for you to record with. Test the crap out of them and decide for yourself. Obviously I was more impressed with the versatility of the Digitech GNX3... they now have the GNX4 with extra features, but I can't justify buying one while my GNX3 does the job. Another plus is that the GNX3 is cheaper than the GNX4.

Still... check them both out before you buy. You're the person who knows what type of sounds you want and like.

Keep in mind, though, that both the Digitech and the Korg have a steep learning curve when it comes to making your own unique sounds. Read the manuals as well as just trying them out.

#12
Yup, I thought the analog signal of the tonelab would be a hiccup for recording.
And yes, I entirely plan on testing out both of these, and more besides. I'm just doing me research

I take it the main advantage to using a multi-fx like this over software based tone-modelling is that you can then take your fx with all your sets in and use it live no hassle?
#13
Abso-effin-lutely

They are unbelievable when used live and sound so pristine when recorded digitally.

One more addition to the GNX3 is it has a XLR in for Dynamic mic's... no phantom power... so condensers would be out of the question, but its another plus for the GNX!
#15
sry but i have a question, wat are some free prograsm that i culd use to record using method 1? so far ive been recording through 'sound recorder' piece of poo.
#16
You should read things like FAQ's and Forum Stickies... these forums are actually very helpful and always have things like that stickied

Click here to go to the relevant thread
#17
Quote by Tom Martin
You don't work for Digitech do you?


lol... no. I even tried to get them to give me a price break on upgrading to the GNX4, but they told me to go eff myself... but in a nicer way.
#18
Okies, well thanks a lot for your help on the modelling side of recording You obviously know your stuff



I'm just gonna go and create another thread solely asking about software based modelling Hopefully I'll be able to find more answers so that I can get to the end of my recording quest-oddessey.
#19
Quote by Tom Martin
Yup, I am going to be singing... but I assumed the recording for that would be much simpler. I've got my eye on a good stand and pop shield, and am probably going to stick to a sturdy SM58, but whilst I'm here I might as well ask what mics are best for recording?


You can read about a few mic's here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=301566

Although a lot of people here swear by the SM57's and 58's, both are based on technology from the 1960's. They are workhorses, but you can get a better sound for the same money.
#21
You said you'll be saving money on a condensor by using Guitar Rig. The truth is most big studios and hobbiest mic up there guitar amps with Shure SM57. You were already mentioning getting an SM58, so you can get an SM58 or an SM57 doesn't really matter both are almost exactly the same, I think an SM57 is preffered on guitars because you can get right up to the grill and don't have the bulky ball capsule. The SM58 contains a built in windscreen, but you can very effectively put a pop screen up in frton of an SM57. It's all up to you.