#1
Hi everyone,
So ive just started music class today and one of the things we had to do was listen to a chord progression and name the chords, all the teacher did was tell us what key is was in(Bb Major).
I didnt know what to do so all i did was write out a Bb Major scale with the degrees underneath. My friend then told me something which i didnt understand, it was something along the lines of "the second and third degrees are minor chords" and others were major, or diminsihed, i really dont know.
could someone please clear this up? I hope this made sense, sorry if it didnt.
#2
Since you know the scale degrees of Bb Major,,,all you need to do to figure out the chord tonalities is to write out the third and fifth of each scale degree with-in the scale. Basically, what you can do is start on any note of the scale, skip the next note in the scale, and that is the third of that chord, then skip the next note in the scale and then you're at the fifth. Let's say we're going to find the second scale degree of Bb Major, or C. Taking the third and fifth scale degree of C in Bb Major gives you the chord C, Eb, and G, which is a c minor chord, or ii in Bb Major. In this way you can figure out what each chord tonality is for each scale. However, eventually knowing Major and Minor chord tonalities becomes second nature. I hope this helps, and I'm sorry if it seems belittling.

EDIT: I forgot to say that if the chord has a minor third and a perfect fifth then the chord is minor, if the chord has a major third and a perfect fifth then its major, and it has a minor third and a "minor" fifth then its diminished. It can't really be called a minor fifth per se, most often its called a flat fifth, but its essentially the same in the world of composition. You probably knew most of this.
Last edited by rokket2005 at Aug 9, 2006,
#3
thanks rokket,
still trying to get my head around all of that but you definately helped.
#4
Well, if your creating a Major scale chord progression, your progression will always go Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished.

Therefore, if your progression is in the key of Bb Major, your chord progression will be:


Bb Major | C Minor | D Minor | Eb Major | F Major | G Minor | A Diminished  
   I          ii       iii        IV         V        vi          vii°
Been away, am back
#5
Another suggestion: to start out with, don't even worry about the chord types (major, minor), just see if you can pick out the IV and V chords as you listen to different songs. Those two chords are usually major (* read fine print below, ha), and are the easiest for most people to get a grip on (judging by what I saw in music class).

Then graduate to starting to pick out the others, and knowing which type they should be, based on theory.

* disclaimer: I say IV and V chords are "usually major" cos 1) I'm guessing chances are you'll be listening to more music in major keys then minor keys, at least at the start, and 2) even in minor keys the V is sometimes major.
#6
Well, if your creating a Major scale chord progression, your progression will always go Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished.


at least that's how it works in theory (no pun intended), in reality esp in rock it often works out differently especially with the VII chord (is hardly ever diminished, is usually major and is flat i.e. bVII).

But if your music teacher is assigning songs in the key of Bb I'd guess chances are slim you're listening to any shredding